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"come up/down" and "go up/down" with "stairs" Options
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 6:12:56 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,714
Neurons: 14,178
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!

I know that "come/go up/down" is an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Come up/down:[Intransitive (+ to/behind etc): move near someone or something:]
Go up/down[Intransitive (+ to): to reach as far as a particular place/to go to a lower floor of a building]: We went down for dinner at nine o'clock/The elevator was going down.
When gooding "came up/down", I found out this Q & A:
Quote:
Q: My question is simple: Can I use the verbs "come up/down" and "go up/down" with "stairs" ? Please, take a look:
1. He came up by the stairs. Explanation = he came up using the stairs.
2. He came down by the stairs. Explanation = he came down using the stairs

3. He went up by the stairs. Explanation = he went up using the stairs
4. He went down by the stairs. Explanation = he went down using the stairs.

My interpretation: Come up/down by the stairs; go up/down by the stairs = Take the stairs.

A: Yes, but 'by' would only be used where there are alternative means for going up and down: He came down by the stairs, not by the escalator or the lift. Where there are only stairs (as in a house), you would just say he came down the stairs.

(And 'came downstairs', one word, means came to the storey below, by whatever means - stairs, lift, bungee jumping out of the window, sawing a hole through the floor, etc.)



So, I saw that 'come/go up/down" can be used transitively in these examples:
1- He came down the stairs.

2-I didn't hear you coming up the stairs.
>Why use stairs when I can use the lift?
But this is only the first floor. That lift is for wheelchair users!



Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 10:43:49 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 12,179
Neurons: 60,532
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!

I know that "come/go up/down" is an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Come up/down:[Intransitive (+ to/behind etc): move near someone or something:]
Go up/down[Intransitive (+ to): to reach as far as a particular place/to go to a lower floor of a building]: We went down for dinner at nine o'clock/The elevator was going down.
When gooding "came up/down", I found out this Q & A:
Quote:
Q: My question is simple: Can I use the verbs "come up/down" and "go up/down" with "stairs" ? Please, take a look:
1. He came up by the stairs. Explanation = he came up using the stairs.
2. He came down by the stairs. Explanation = he came down using the stairs

3. He went up by the stairs. Explanation = he went up using the stairs
4. He went down by the stairs. Explanation = he went down using the stairs.

My interpretation: Come up/down by the stairs; go up/down by the stairs = Take the stairs.

A: Yes, but 'by' would only be used where there are alternative means for going up and down: He came down by the stairs, not by the escalator or the lift. Where there are only stairs (as in a house), you would just say he came down the stairs.

(And 'came downstairs', one word, means came to the storey below, by whatever means - stairs, lift, bungee jumping out of the window, sawing a hole through the floor, etc.)

Yes. As stated, using "by" would indicate there is more than one way to move up or down in the building/house.


So, I saw that 'come/go up/down" can be used transitively in these examples:
1- He came down the stairs. Yes. No problems with this.

2-I didn't hear you coming up the stairs. Yes. No problems with this.

>Why use stairs when I can use the lift?
But this is only the first floor. That lift is for wheelchair users!
This would usually be said if the lift was designated only for wheelchair users, or people who could not climb stairs. Otherwise, anyone should be allowed to use it.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 3:13:48 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 16,029
Neurons: 50,781
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Oh. I've been in multi-storey hotels and office buildings which take a lot of traffic and if one is only coming up/down one flight of stairs that they are requested not to use the lifts. So although it might go up and down 20-40 stories, only wheelchair users use it to the First Floor. I though that was what it meant.
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 3:18:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,714
Neurons: 14,178
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
FounDit wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!

I know that "come/go up/down" is an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Come up/down:[Intransitive (+ to/behind etc): move near someone or something:]
Go up/down[Intransitive (+ to): to reach as far as a particular place/to go to a lower floor of a building]: We went down for dinner at nine o'clock/The elevator was going down.
When gooding "came up/down", I found out this Q & A:
Quote:
Q: My question is simple: Can I use the verbs "come up/down" and "go up/down" with "stairs" ? Please, take a look:
1. He came up by the stairs. Explanation = he came up using the stairs.
2. He came down by the stairs. Explanation = he came down using the stairs

3. He went up by the stairs. Explanation = he went up using the stairs
4. He went down by the stairs. Explanation = he went down using the stairs.

My interpretation: Come up/down by the stairs; go up/down by the stairs = Take the stairs.

A: Yes, but 'by' would only be used where there are alternative means for going up and down: He came down by the stairs, not by the escalator or the lift. Where there are only stairs (as in a house), you would just say he came down the stairs.

(And 'came downstairs', one word, means came to the storey below, by whatever means - stairs, lift, bungee jumping out of the window, sawing a hole through the floor, etc.)

Yes. As stated, using "by" would indicate there is more than one way to move up or down in the building/house.


So, I saw that 'come/go up/down" can be used transitively in these examples:
1- He came down the stairs. Yes. No problems with this.

2-I didn't hear you coming up the stairs. Yes. No problems with this.

>Why use stairs when I can use the lift?
But this is only the first floor. That lift is for wheelchair users!
This would usually be said if the lift was designated only for wheelchair users, or people who could not climb stairs. Otherwise, anyone should be allowed to use it.


Thanks a lot, FounDit,
Then I should check some other dictionaries since both Longman and Oxford only mentioned that 'go(come) up/down' as Intransitive
an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Come up/down:[Intransitive (+ to/behind etc): move near someone or something:]
Go up/down[Intransitive (+ to): to reach as far as a particular place/to go to a lower floor of a building]:

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 4:07:12 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
Posts: 1,420
Neurons: 7,616
Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
A cooperator wrote:


I know that "come/go up/down" is an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Come up/down:[Intransitive (+ to/behind etc): move near someone or something:]
Go up/down[Intransitive (+ to): to reach as far as a particular place/to go to a lower floor of a building]: We went down for dinner at nine o'clock/The elevator was going down.


I don't agree that these are phrasal verbs. Both the verb and the adverb (or preposition for some grammarians) are used with their core meanings.

This is true whether the preposition has a preposition object, as in I came down the stairs, or the preposition/adverb does not have an object as in The lift is coming down.
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 5:15:56 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,714
Neurons: 14,178
Location: Seiyun, Hadramawt, Yemen
BobShilling wrote:
A cooperator wrote:


I know that "come/go up/down" is an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Come up/down:[Intransitive (+ to/behind etc): move near someone or something:]
Go up/down[Intransitive (+ to): to reach as far as a particular place/to go to a lower floor of a building]: We went down for dinner at nine o'clock/The elevator was going down.


I don't agree that these are phrasal verbs. Both the verb and the adverb (or preposition for some grammarians) are used with their core meanings.

This is true whether the preposition has a preposition object, as in I came down the stairs, or the preposition/adverb does not have an object as in The lift is coming down.


I am not the one who says that 'go(come) down/up' is an idiomatic phrasal verb(verb + a preposition), but the paper Longman and Oxford dictionaries. So do the online electronic Longman and Oxford dictionaries.


Quote:
Online Longman dictionary:
go up phrasal verb
5. TO ANOTHER PLACE British English to go from one place to another, especially to a place that is further north, or to a town or city from a smaller place [+to]:
We’re going up to Scotland next weekend.
He went up to the farm to get some eggs.

Online Longman dictionary
go down phrasal verb
5. GO FROM ONE PLACE TO ANOTHER to go from one place to another, especially to a place that is further south
[+ to]
We’re going down to Bournemouth for the weekend.
He’s gone down to the store to get some milk.



The online Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary also mentioned 'go(come) up/down' is an idiomatic phrasal verb:
Quote:
go up phrasal verb
go up phrasal verb:
go up (to…) (from…): ​to go from one place to another, especially further north or to a city or large town from a smaller place
When are you next going up to Scotland?
We went up to London last weekend.
opposite go down (to…) (from…)

go down (to…) (from…)
go down phrasal verb:
​to go from one place to another, especially further south or from a city or large town to a smaller place
They've gone down to Brighton for a couple of days.
opposite go up (to…) (from…)


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Sunday, November 17, 2019 5:31:25 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,817
Neurons: 84,190
No, look at the meaning.

Is coming down to London the same as coming down the stairs?
Is going up to Scotland the same as going up to the third floor of a building?

A phrasal verb is one where the combination of the verb and preposition gives it a different meaning.

In 'come up the stairs' the preposition has its normal meaning.
Up ^
a change in position from lower to higher

It is a direction.
you come up the stairs
you come along the corridor
you come down the stairs
you come through the door

those are using the prepositions to show movement - a vertical change in height from high to low is 'down'.

But Scotland is not physically above where you are in England. It is further north, but you don't climb to move upwards to get there, like you climb up stairs to get to a higher floor.

Online Longman dictionary:
go up phrasal verb
5. TO ANOTHER PLACE British English to go from one place to another, especially to a place that is further north, or to a town or city from a smaller place [+to]:
We’re going up to Scotland next weekend.
He went up to the farm to get some eggs.

That is a phrasal verb because 'up' as a preposition does not mean to go north, but that particular combination of words can have that meaning.
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