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goddamn it Options
Tara2
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 3:31:33 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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COBB: Would you sit down?
Mal lowers herself gracefully into a leather wingback chair.
Cobb approaches, pulls out a length of BLACK ROPE and kneels
at Mal's feet. She looks down at him. Cobb TIES the rope around the CHAIR LEGS.Cobb gets to his feet, letting
out the rope as he moves back to the window.

Mall: What're you doing?
Cobb tosses the rope out- Cobb: Getting some air.
He tugs on the rope, testing. The weight of the chair, with
Mal on it, holds.
COBB: Stay seated. Please.

And with that, he JUMPS. Mal considers the open window.

Inception, movie



But Mal get up from the chair and Cobb fall down then he says "goddamn it". What does "it" refer to here? What is the literally meaning of "damn"?
thar
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 3:37:23 PM

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There is no 'it'. The whole thing is an idiom - just a way of swearing (profanity) to show frustration.



Originally I assume it was "[may] God damn it". Ie I hope it suffers. But there is no 'it' and it became fixed as just a way to swear.


It can even be combined into one word, which shows how the individual words have lost all of their original meaning.

Quote:
goddamnit
interjection (sometimes initial capital letter) Informal: Sometimes Offensive.
(used to express anger, perplexity, amazement, etc.)
Tara2
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 3:51:24 PM

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Thanks a lot, thar!
But I myself that he say "it" to? He doesn't say "god damn" but he says "god damn it".
I thought by "it" he means "Mal" that he get up from the chair and he fall down, no?
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 4:22:19 PM

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Joined: 10/28/2013
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Tara2 wrote:
Thanks a lot, thar!
But I myself that he say "it" to? He doesn't say "god damn" but he says "god damn it".
I thought by "it" he means "Mal" that he get up from the chair and he fall down, no?


As Thar said, the whole thing is an idiom. The words in it have no individual meaning.
Tara2
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 4:31:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 1,007
Neurons: 4,485
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Thanks a lot, thar!
But I myself that he say "it" to? He doesn't say "god damn" but he says "god damn it".
I thought by "it" he means "Mal" that he get up from the chair and he fall down, no?


As Thar said, the whole thing is an idiom. The words in it have no individual meaning.


Thanks a lot!
But what is its literal meaning? I know it's a swear but I'd like to know its meaning, please?
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 4:38:35 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Tara2 wrote:
palapaguy wrote:
Tara2 wrote:
Thanks a lot, thar!
But I myself that he say "it" to? He doesn't say "god damn" but he says "god damn it".
I thought by "it" he means "Mal" that he get up from the chair and he fall down, no?


As Thar said, the whole thing is an idiom. The words in it have no individual meaning.


Thanks a lot!
But what is its literal meaning? I know it's a swear but I'd like to know its meaning, please?


It means God damn it, Lord Almighty condemn the thing that has upset me to eternal punishment in hell.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 4:47:37 PM

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Originally literally, my guess is it meant

May God damn it.

Ie let God punish it (whatever you are angry at, the situation)


But now it is just a fixed phrase. To some people it is sacrilege to use 'god' in a swear word, but for most people it is just an idiom and has nothing to do with God.
But the individual parts can't be analysed.



goddamnit is just a fixed interjection and has lost the connection to any origin it had. There are different ways of writing it because some writers may separate the words and others may just write down the sound of the word (God damn it / god damn it /goddamnit / damn it / goddammit / dammit/ damn / darn.
No difference in meaning.

In the same way as "goodbye" comes from "God be with you" but today it has its own meaning and has no connection to God. You can shorten it from goodbye to bye, which shows the original words have been lost because 'be with you' makes no sense.


There are various phrases using 'damnation/ damned/ [God]damn it'.

Damn
Quote:

exclamation INFORMAL
expressing anger or frustration.
"Damn! I completely forgot!"

adjectiveINFORMAL
used for emphasis, especially to express anger or frustration.
"turn that damn thing off!"


Quote:
goddam
adjective · adverb · nounINFORMAL•NORTH AMERICAN
used for emphasis, especially to express anger or frustration.
"I feel so sick I can hardly raise my goddam head"



Quote:
goddamned
adjective or adverb
variants: or goddamn or goddam
Definition of goddamned
informal, sometimes offensive



Three syllables just gives you a bit more opportunity to vent your frustration! Whistle
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, November 15, 2019 5:15:55 PM

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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
Back in the day we used the simple term "epithet."

Tara2
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 3:01:49 AM

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Thank you all so much Whistle
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 6:50:35 AM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

As "godammit" is an American idiom primarily, it isn't it my own personal lexicon. But, as it is so common through American media, everybody else is familiar with it. So, one in a while, in a particular moment of frustration, I might also say, in a very level voice but on a rising tone of frustration: "God damn it to hell!"....and then explode.

Just another variation on the same theme.
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 7:21:26 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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Romany wrote:

As "godammit" is an American idiom primarily, it isn't it my own personal lexicon. But, as it is so common through American media, everybody else is familiar with it. So, one in a while, in a particular moment of frustration, I might also say, in a very level voice but on a rising tone of frustration: "God damn it to hell!"....and then explode.

Just another variation on the same theme.


Thanks a lot, Romany!
I think n this variation "damn" is like "condemn" as Sarrriesfan said, right?
thar
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 7:46:26 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Yes.


For some reason, expletives in English come in three forms:
Sex - 'fucking' is no so common in the language you can hear people using it before practically every word in a sentence. Not good and very boring.
Bodily fluids - 'shit' is the most common version but people can get more inventive.
And
Religion - bloody hell, damn
Since until quite recently this was not acceptable, many 'alternatives' have arisen, like 'gosh darn' (for 'God damn') and 'blimey' (God blind me) heck (hell). But now a lot of people just use religious references - god, Jesus / Jeez, goddamn it.

I do not suggest you emulate the trend for any of these, however much you want your English to sound collquial. Whistle
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 9:48:02 AM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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Thank you so much thar :)
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 9:54:28 AM

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Joined: 9/19/2011
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Neurons: 60,532
thar wrote:
Yes.


For some reason, expletives in English come in three forms:
Sex - 'fucking' is now so common in the language you can hear people using it before practically every word in a sentence. Not good and very boring.
Very true. I often pay attention when a movie begins to see how long it takes for someone to use this word. It's usually within the first ten minutes. The last movie I watched had it happen at 6 and 1/2 minutes.

It isn't a trend to be admired, IMO, but is heard more and more often in speech. As has often been said, profanity reveals a lack of vocabulary and lazy thinking. I believe this to be true.



Bodily fluids - 'shit' is the most common version but people can get more inventive.
And
Religion - bloody hell, damn
Since until quite recently this was not acceptable, many 'alternatives' have arisen, like 'gosh darn' (for 'God damn') and 'blimey' (God blind me) heck (hell). But now a lot of people just use religious references - god, Jesus / Jeez, goddamn it.

I do not suggest you emulate the trend for any of these, however much you want your English to sound collquial. Whistle

Absolutely.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Tara2
Posted: Saturday, November 16, 2019 10:01:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 1,007
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Thank you very much FounDit!
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