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like/love/hate+ing or to Options
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 12:39:07 PM

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The following is from "Grammar in Use by Murphy". Is that just for repeated actions or can be for a specific situation like the below?
Do you like getting up early tomorrow? or Do you like to get up early tomorrow?

"When you talk about repeated actions, you can use "-ing" or "to..." after these verbs.
Do you like getting up early? or Do you like to get up early?"
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 1:34:20 PM
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Tara -

Think about what you want to say in the two sentences above. Then look at the tense. Now think about what the word "tomorrow" means. What tense would verbs relating to a time after the present have?
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 3:13:12 PM

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Romany wrote:

Tara -
What tense would verbs relating to a time after the present have?

Thank you so much Romany!
sorry I don't understand this part of your explanation. Can you please explain?
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 8:07:55 PM

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Tara2 wrote:
The following is from "Grammar in Use by Murphy". Is that just for repeated actions or can be for a specific situation like the below?
Do you like getting up early tomorrow? or Do you like to get up early tomorrow?

"When you talk about repeated actions, you can use "-ing" or "to..." after these verbs.
Do you like getting up early? or Do you like to get up early?"


The sentences are not correct. We would say, "Do you like getting up early in the morning?" or "Do you like to get up early in the morning?"


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 11:44:32 AM

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Thank you so much FounDit!
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 12:00:48 PM

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I should add that my answer was for a repeated action. To use it for a specific action such as tomorrow, we'd say, "Do you want to get up early tomorrow?"


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 1:23:50 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 843
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Thank you again FounDit so much!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 1:32:56 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Sorry I confused you, Tara - I figured your English was good enough for you to self-correct if you were given a hint.

What I meant was that "Do you like..." is the present tense. You can talk about what you DO like in the present, or even in the past.

But you CAN'T talk about what you WOULD LIKE 'tomorrow' i.e. in the future.

It's nothing to do with grammar; it's just logical common-sense. (I hated avocados until I was in my 20s. Then one evening I had to eat one at a dinner party and loved it...and have ever since.But had you asked me on any night before that whether I liked avo. or not I would have said No (in the past and the present)...but that didn't apply to the future.)

Hope I haven't ended up confusing you more!
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 3:11:18 PM

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Joined: 11/8/2017
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Romany wrote:

Sorry I confused you, Tara - I figured your English was good enough for you to self-correct if you were given a hint.

What I meant was that "Do you like..." is the present tense. You can talk about what you DO like in the present, or even in the past.

But you CAN'T talk about what you WOULD LIKE 'tomorrow' i.e. in the future.

It's nothing to do with grammar; it's just logical common-sense. (I hated avocados until I was in my 20s. Then one evening I had to eat one at a dinner party and loved it...and have ever since.But had you asked me on any night before that whether I liked avo. or not I would have said No (in the past and the present)...but that didn't apply to the future.)

Hope I haven't ended up confusing you more!

Thank you so much Romany for the good explanation. I understand Whistle
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