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Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 4:56:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 843
Neurons: 3,841
What does "just" mean?

Leonardo: I don't know why there are artists in kells When all that man wants us to do is to build this crazy wall.

Assoua: Yes, that is all the man cares about, nothing else, and you continue to defend him, Brendan.

Brendan: Uncle just wants to protect us from the outside. When the Northmen come to kells, they'll make no distinction between young and old. So....

Leonardo: Prepare or meet your doom! (All laughing)

Brendan: You just don't understand.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 5:05:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,433
Neurons: 82,567
It is an intensifier. Really.

Quote:
B1
used to make a statement or order stronger:
He just won't do as he's told.
It's just too expensive.




But it is a very complicated word. You really have to look at the placement in the sentence, and go by context (and tone of voice), because it means opposite things!

Quote:
used to reduce the force of a statement and to suggest that it is not very important:
Can I just borrow the scissors for a second?
I just wanted to ask you if you're free this afternoon.


Whistle
Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, October 8, 2019 5:10:11 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 843
Neurons: 3,841
thar wrote:
It is an intensifier. Really.

Quote:
B1
used to make a statement or order stronger:
He just won't do as he's told.
It's just too expensive.




But it is a very complicated word. You really have to look at the placement in the sentence, and go by context (and tone of voice), because it means opposite things!

Quote:
used to reduce the force of a statement and to suggest that it is not very important:
Can I just borrow the scissors for a second?
I just wanted to ask you if you're free this afternoon.


Whistle

Thank you very much, thar!

Whistle
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 9:53:12 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2014
Posts: 192
Neurons: 16,874
Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
Tara2 wrote:
What does "just" mean?

Leonardo: I don't know why there are artists in kells When all that man wants us to do is to build this crazy wall.

Assoua: Yes, that is all the man cares about, nothing else, and you continue to defend him, Brendan.

Brendan: Uncle just wants to protect us from the outside. When the Northmen come to kells, they'll make no distinction between young and old. So....

Leonardo: Prepare or meet your doom! (All laughing)

Brendan: You just don't understand.


Hi, Tara.

And in the earlier instance (Brendan's first line in this passage), "just" means... simply; only; no more than: "Uncle's only concern is to protect us..."

the Weasel
WeaselWorks Freelance Editing
Tara2
Posted: Wednesday, October 9, 2019 11:43:30 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/8/2017
Posts: 843
Neurons: 3,841
Thank you so much WeaselADAPT for the help!
WeaselADAPT
Posted: Thursday, October 10, 2019 6:43:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/6/2014
Posts: 192
Neurons: 16,874
Location: Kentwood, Michigan, United States
Tara2 wrote:
Thank you so much WeaselADAPT for the help!


You got it! I'm happy to help.

the Weasel
Romany
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 2:12:14 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,715
Neurons: 49,668
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

One more comment Tara (Just when you thought the thread was finished!)

Do you know what "kells" is? Did you look it up, if not?

It's a town. In Ireland.

So: - how do we write a proper name - a person's, a country's, a town's, a dog's, a village's? (Hint: look at Weasel's name, and mine, and your own)
thar
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 2:55:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,433
Neurons: 82,567
Home at one time (after they moved from the Hills of Tara) to the High Kings of Ireland - the Kings of Tara. Whistle





Romany
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 3:10:21 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,715
Neurons: 49,668
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Thar -

Yeah - to me Kells has a kind of fairy-tale, ancient aura about it - probably because of the Books of Kells. If I were ever to write something set in Ireland I'd set it there, in the old Faery Kingdom where all the family stories of my childhood originated.
thar
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 3:17:56 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,433
Neurons: 82,567
There was an earlier question about the 'prepare or meet thy doom' where Tara explained this came from a film. Never heard of it, but presumably it does as you would like to, plays with the magic and legend. Although Vikings are a few thousand years after the legends of Tara.


Strange combination of names though, so Lord knows what the plot-line is.
Brendan, yes, makes sense. Leonardo - what is this, Ninja Turtles? and Assoua sounds North African to me but could be anything, I guess - just not very Irish!


Also, I must admit that two things became connected in my brain that shouldn't be - the Book of Hours and The Book of Kells - so somehow a Kell was something like an hour - in terms of religious practice, not a place. You know how the first connection you make, in ignorance, stays with you even when you learn it was wrong?

In Icelandic it would be the Book of Cuddles -which sounds even nicer! Whistle
Romany
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 3:30:35 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,715
Neurons: 49,668
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

The names sometimes used by writers can be horribly confusing at times, can't they? I once read a book - set in 16thC England - where one of the characters rejoiced in that well-known Middle English name "Chuck"!! (Actually, I had to stop reading it. Lost all confidence in the author!)

(Wonder if these time-travelling Vikings wear horned helmets?)
thar
Posted: Friday, October 11, 2019 4:56:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,433
Neurons: 82,567
Are you sure it wasn't a name at the time ?
I think of it as American, but that is so often closer to Middle English than modern British English is. - Hmmmmm, that doesn't pan out because apparently it is modern - twentieth century American.
[And of course the northern 'chuck' as a term of endearment, but not a name in itself.]

But - it is an Anglo-Norman name, apparently - stumpy - [chouque - tree stump. Modern French le chicot?].
So maybe it assimilated but was becoming old-fashioned by the Middle Ages and died out before reappearing as a nickname for Charles.

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