The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

Wellington boots in the USA, Canada and Australia Options
AlyonaSunlight
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:33:28 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/1/2014
Posts: 398
Neurons: 2,755
Location: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
Hello!
Could you tell me, please, what the most common names for “Wellington boots” are:

In the USA
Canada
Australia

On Wikipedia I found this:

the USA and Canada -
rubber boots, also galoshes, mud boots, rain boots, mucking boots, billy boots, or gum-boots.

Australia - "gumboots" or "gummies", "wellies".

I’d like to know if this information is accurate enough.

Thank you in advance.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 12:24:55 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,679
Neurons: 58,539
AlyonaSunlight wrote:
Hello!
Could you tell me, please, what the most common names for “Wellington boots” are:

In the USA
Canada
Australia

On Wikipedia I found this:

the USA and Canada -
rubber boots, also galoshes, mud boots, rain boots, mucking boots, billy boots, or gum-boots.

Australia - "gumboots" or "gummies", "wellies".

I’d like to know if this information is accurate enough.

Thank you in advance.


In my area of the US, I've most often heard them called them "mud boots, rain boots, or rubber boots". I use the term, "rubber boots".


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Romany
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 1:28:05 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,637
Neurons: 49,309
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I can vouch for them being wellies or gumboots in Australia - though "gummies" is a bit dodgy. Everywhere I lived gumboots were "gumbies". (And 'rain boots' and 'mud boots' only came up to the ankle so aren't wellies there.Nor, of course are sand boots or reef boots)
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:11:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,255
Neurons: 81,827
I wonder what Wellington would have thought about them being called wellies.

Or the Earl of Sandwich about sarnies. Whistle
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:22:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,679
Neurons: 58,539
thar wrote:
I wonder what Wellington would have thought about them being called wellies.

Or the Earl of Sandwich about sarnies. Whistle


"Sarnies" is a new one for me. I've never come across this word before. I wonder at the explanation that it may be a Northern, or dialectical pronunciation of the first syllable of sandwich. Really? How in the world did an "r" slip into that? A "sandie" I could see, but a "sarnie"?...Think

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:38:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,679
Neurons: 58,539
I think most people think of them as useful in mud or water, but they are also called wellies, or Wellington's because of the way they are stitched together. These are known as Wellington's also.



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
RSoul
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:42:45 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/29/2019
Posts: 133
Neurons: 557
FounDit wrote:
I think most people think of them as useful in mud or water, but they are also called wellies, or Wellington's because of the way they are stitched together. These are known as Wellington's also.



Not in my country they aren't. Wellies are rubber!

Ubuntu isn't Swahili for 'can't install Debian'.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 3:59:15 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,679
Neurons: 58,539
RSoul wrote:
FounDit wrote:
I think most people think of them as useful in mud or water, but they are also called wellies, or Wellington's because of the way they are stitched together. These are known as Wellington's also.



Not in my country they aren't. Wellies are rubber!


I know what you mean!

I was surprised to find it true that this style is described as Wellington's when I did a bit of research for some boots online just a week or so ago. This was especially surprising because I was looking for some western boots (my favorite footwear). I did not know cowboy boots were put together in Wellington style. Learn something new everyday, sometimes. I also have two pair of the rubber ones.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
RSoul
Posted: Thursday, September 12, 2019 5:57:50 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 8/29/2019
Posts: 133
Neurons: 557
FounDit wrote:
RSoul wrote:
FounDit wrote:
I think most people think of them as useful in mud or water, but they are also called wellies, or Wellington's because of the way they are stitched together. These are known as Wellington's also.



Not in my country they aren't. Wellies are rubber!


I know what you mean!

I was surprised to find it true that this style is described as Wellington's when I did a bit of research for some boots online just a week or so ago. This was especially surprising because I was looking for some western boots (my favorite footwear). I did not know cowboy boots were put together in Wellington style. Learn something new everyday, sometimes. I also have two pair of the rubber ones.


I'll take your word for it.

Ubuntu isn't Swahili for 'can't install Debian'.
Romany
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 10:19:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,637
Neurons: 49,309
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
I'm very confused about boots being "stitched" like Wellies. How on earth are rubber boots stitched?

The Duke of Wellington had his bootmaker design him some new boots - purely because of sartorial changes in men's costume. If anything, it was the style which made them comfortable and, of course, fashionably trendy. The stitching of any boots at that time was down to each persons's bootmaker, and the best bootmaker (the name Lobb spring immediately to mind) would stand or fall by the stitchwork of the individual. Thus, it wasn't the actual boot that would be given reputation for the way it was made - in which stitching is integral - but the craftsperson who had made them. So Lobb boots weren't any particular style but were made by Lobb - at one time the most superb bootmakers in the country. And only affordable for the upper classes.

Wellington's new boots differed from the heeled shoes, highly decorated and embroidered, which had been regularly worn with knee stockings until then. Boots to the knee - when not riding - were a la Wellington.

The fact that the originals were higher at the front than at the back no longer necessarily applies - just that they come up to or around the knee. The fact that cowboy boots hover around the ankle would disqualify them for having any relation to wellies in the UK, while, of course, any boot not made of rubber is automatically out of the running!
FounDit
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 2:56:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,679
Neurons: 58,539
Wellington doesn't refer to the material the boots are made of so much as the way they are put together, whether stitched, bonded with glue or heat, or formed.

If you do a search and look at the images of Wellington boots, you will see a great variety of colors and styles, but all have a common form: The upper and the cover at the heel tend to come together at the center of the sides of the tops. Whether that line continues up the sides or not seems not to matter. The basic style can be seen.

I found the links I mentioned earlier in this post:

This link discusses the history and mentions Wellington and his boots.
https://people.seas.harvard.edu/~jones/mckay/history.html

This post has pictures of shoes and boots from the 1800's
https://www.ccsutlery.com/store/civil-war-shoes-boots.html



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, September 13, 2019 5:12:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/30/2016
Posts: 1,446
Neurons: 9,152
Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
Walmer Castle on the Kent coast of the English Channel is the official residence of the Admiral of the Cinque ports a ceremonial roll for many centuries, the last but one was Her Majesty the Late Queen Mother. There is a lovely garden there in her honour.
Another of the holders of the post was the Duke Of Wellington on display there are a pair of his actual boots.
, https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/walmer-castle-and-gardens/history-and-stories/invention-wellington-boot/

They are close to the high knee length cavalry boots in some of those pictures of civil war boots, but not really similar to those able length boots in the first picture.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.