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companies inventing their own adjectives. Options
prolixitysquared
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 8:51:32 PM

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I don't know if it was a year ago or more than that, but at some point, Comcast came out with its own adjective-- Comcastic. I thought considerably about that when I first heard the invented word. And Comcast has grown quite a bit in recent years. In my book, a company has to have quite an ego to start inventing its own words, especially descriptive ones. I don't know if they're hugely adopted by consumers. The whole thing is a bit obnoxious, but I guess if I were at the top of the cable company's marketing campaign, I'd be patting myself on the back for that one. It's just almost a strange phenomenon when companies become brave enough to create their own words.

There's also Wendy's fast food chain with Threeconomics.

On a similar note, I do like the combining of certain words for the sake of creating new, more specific meanings in one fresh word but on the community and not commercial scale.

I don't go to bars except maybe once or twice a year, but when I do venture out, I usually bring knitting supplies. Most social tactics bore me. Knitting is a way to keep productive and entertained. I then met a girl who told me the word for 'knitting' in 'public' was kipping. I liked that one.
krmiller
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 10:42:01 PM

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I don't think those really count as creating new words. They're just marketing slogans. Is anyone really likely to use them in real life?

I've seen the word KiP before, but never as a verb treated as a real word in that way! I'm a knitter too :D
prolixitysquared
Posted: Wednesday, March 18, 2009 11:17:05 PM

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krmiller wrote:
I don't think those really count as creating new words. They're just marketing slogans. Is anyone really likely to use them in real life?

I've seen the word KiP before, but never as a verb treated as a real word in that way! I'm a knitter too :D


That's true about the slogan thing. I guess I try to block out marketing so much that I don't remember many (at least besides recent campaigns) examples except current ones.
Citiwoman
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 2:01:26 AM
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Embarassingly, my girlfriends and I invented the term "cellulitious" in college.
Citiwoman
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 2:02:38 AM
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Another of my pet peeves is when people spell embarrassingly incorrectly, as I just did.
kaliedel
Posted: Thursday, March 19, 2009 3:33:40 PM

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It may not be an example of a company inventing its own word, per se, but who here doesn't use the term "Xerox" in place of "photocopying," even when the machine isn't actually a Xerox? Often times when something becomes popular enough, it replaces the proper word. Not the same as "Comcastic," I'll admit.
bewusstlos
Posted: Friday, March 20, 2009 7:52:23 AM

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I heard on the BBC that both Xerox and Google have been admitted as 'legitimate' verbs in the English language.
MiTziGo
Posted: Friday, March 20, 2009 11:32:36 AM

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Quote:
kaliedel
It may not be an example of a company inventing its own word, per se, but who here doesn't use the term "Xerox" in place of "photocopying," even when the machine isn't actually a Xerox? Often times when something becomes popular enough, it replaces the proper word. Not the same as "Comcastic," I'll admit.


There are a number of examples like "Xerox," where a brand name has become the accepted name for a product.
Others are Band-Aid, Kleenex, and Q-Tip.
Drew
Posted: Friday, March 20, 2009 5:37:20 PM
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MichalG wrote:


There are a number of examples like "Xerox," where a brand name has become the accepted name for a product.
Others are Band-Aid, Kleenex, and Q-Tip.


I was surprised recently when I discovered that the word "Frisbee" is actually a trademark. If you are writing an article for the Associated Press, for instance, and the object you are referring to isn't made by the Frisbee company, you have to refer to it as a "flying disc." That just sounds weird to me.
prolixitysquared
Posted: Friday, March 20, 2009 11:35:34 PM

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Drew wrote:
MichalG wrote:


There are a number of examples like "Xerox," where a brand name has become the accepted name for a product.
Others are Band-Aid, Kleenex, and Q-Tip.


I was surprised recently when I discovered that the word "Frisbee" is actually a trademark. If you are writing an article for the Associated Press, for instance, and the object you are referring to isn't made by the Frisbee company, you have to refer to it as a "flying disc." That just sounds weird to me.


There's also Styrofoam of the Dow Chemical Company. I always forget and think it's just a common noun, but then spell check in Microsoft Word automatically capitalizes it.
Joseph Glantz
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2009 7:49:15 AM
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There can also be legal issues surrounding when a company name becomes the known name - Ex. Xerox for photocopying or , if I remember correctly, cellophane which really is a thin clear plastic. If names become known they may be considered to be in the "public domain." which may affect the right to collect payments for the usage
Luftmarque
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2009 12:40:00 PM

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You'd be surprised (maybe) by just how much effort a company will make to prevent its name from entering the public domain. Kodak was successful (I assume by threats, lawsuits, and constant vigilance) in preventing "kodak" from becoming a lower-case verb, while Xerox lost control of its memorable name. I'm not sure, but I suspect Google people are happy to have "googling" enter the language--shows how much the attitudes about copyright vs. free advertising via the "meme" have changed.



}- Luftmarque لوفتمارك -{ Le doute n'est pas une condition agréable, mais la certitude est absurde.—Voltaire
kaliedel
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2009 3:22:44 PM

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Luftmarque wrote:


You'd be surprised (maybe) by just how much effort a company will make to prevent its name from entering the public domain. Kodak was successful (I assume by threats, lawsuits, and constant vigilance) in preventing "kodak" from becoming a lower-case verb, while Xerox lost control of its memorable name. I'm not sure, but I suspect Google people are happy to have "googling" enter the language--shows how much the attitudes about copyright vs. free advertising via the "meme" have changed.



I understand their position, but if I were calling the shots in any of those companies, I think I'd allow the name to enter public domain. The usage seems to imply a lot of trust, familiarity, and a level of competence - why not try to latch onto that?
mustabir
Posted: Saturday, March 21, 2009 4:43:44 PM
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kaliedel wrote:
It may not be an example of a company inventing its own word, per se, but who here doesn't use the term "Xerox" in place of "photocopying," even when the machine isn't actually a Xerox? Often times when something becomes popular enough, it replaces the proper word. Not the same as "Comcastic," I'll admit.


Similarly some time ago I heard that FedEx is used to say "sending by courier" by many in the US. Can someone from the US confirm me for this? :) I actually do not think that these companies will show any unhappiness to this issue since they are having the easiest way of being advertised... I'd agree with kaliedel on this point.
kaliedel
Posted: Sunday, March 22, 2009 8:18:18 PM

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mustabir wrote:
Similarly some time ago I heard that FedEx is used to say "sending by courier" by many in the US. Can someone from the US confirm me for this? :) I actually do not think that these companies will show any unhappiness to this issue since they are having the easiest way of being advertised... I'd agree with kaliedel on this point.


I'm not sure if it's regional or otherwise, but a lot of people where I live (East coast/Philly area) say "FedEx it," even if they're using another company (such as UPS.) I'd imagine something like that is a leg-up on the competition, as it implies your name is universally recognized.
NicoleR
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:41:28 AM

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I recently found out that "escalator" used to be a trademarked name. It's interesting how many now-common things used to be special and unique products!
Betsy D.
Posted: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 10:53:18 AM

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there's also a catergory for Corporatespeak, folks - you may enjoy that. It's under Vocabulary :)

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." -- Mark Twain
arthbard
Posted: Friday, March 27, 2009 12:45:46 AM

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The word Dumpster is also a trademarked brand name.

As for advertisers inventing new words, they've been doing it for years. I don't expect "Comcastic" to catch on with the general population (thank heavens), but halitosis, the "scientific" name for bad breath, was actually born out of an ad campaign for Listerine.
Betsy D.
Posted: Friday, March 27, 2009 11:16:33 AM

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Citiwoman wrote:
Embarassingly, my girlfriends and I invented the term "cellulitious" in college.


hahaha....good one. It's even more applicable at 50 Brick wall

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." -- Mark Twain
marybroadbent
Posted: Wednesday, September 11, 2019 10:19:00 AM
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bewusstlos wrote:
I heard on the BBC that both Xerox and Google have been admitted as 'legitimate' verbs in the English language.
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