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Set to last Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 2:38:17 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 2,399
Neurons: 13,302
UK weather forecast: Downpours set to last 'until end of August'

https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/uk-weather-latest-downpours-set-to-last-until-end-of-august-a4211371.html?am
Is "set" the main verb and "to last" an infinitive acting as it's complement "?
Which meaning of set is used here?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 4:09:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 32,945
Neurons: 204,246
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
This is a headline.
It is not grammatical English. It's not a sentence, it does not have a finite verb.

"Set" is an adjective. It means "fixed", "rigid", "unchanging", "ready (to do something)".

To write that as a sentence, you could add a verb.

The downpours are set to last 'until the end of August'.

The downpours are unchanging and ready to continue until the end of August.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 4:12:16 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/1/2017
Posts: 2,106
Neurons: 387,720
Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
Very good answer.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 7:30:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/4/2015
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Location: Vinton, Iowa, United States
Set to last simply means expected to last (expected to remain; expected to continue).
thar
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 7:49:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 20,077
Neurons: 81,104
A common feature of the grammar you are finding confusing is that they are headlines.

You have to appreciate that headlines have their own grammar rules - a type of shorthand. Nobody speaks like that and nobody writes like that in normal situations. You can't apply a normal grammar breakdown to a headline.

In headlines you
- omit verbs that don't add information (like 'is')
- omit articles
- stack information as adjectives (eg using place names as attributive adjectives)
- if there is a verb, it is in the simple present

The thing to do is look at the first sentence/paragraph of the actual article. That will repeat the same information that was given in the headline, but it will do so using normal grammar.


In this case, it is exactly as drago says.
The first line of the article is:

Quote:
Thunderstorms and heavy downpours are set to hit the UK this week, as Brits face what could be one of the wettest Augusts on record.


And a bit later

Quote:
Regular heavy downpours could continue into the last week of the month - with potentially enough rainfall to make it the wettest August on record.


The headline squeezes most of that information into a few words. Sort of like a low-resolution image.
It shows you the essential information but it is not the one you would want to print out. Whistle



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