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Atatürk
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 4:25:54 AM

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Joined: 10/25/2018
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Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
I've not been studying English in eight years.

Correct?

Ite, maledicti, in ignem aeternum!
Adyl Mouhei
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 4:44:31 AM

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Location: Casablanca, Grand Casablanca, Morocco
I've not been studying English for eight years.
thar
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 6:51:06 AM

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No.

What you you want to say?

Do you want to say you have been studying, but for a period of less than ten years?
That is 'for', not ,'in'.


Or that you did study it in the past, but the last time you did it was ten years ago?
Then there is no need for the progressive.


Atatürk
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 8:37:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2018
Posts: 1,381
Neurons: 5,395
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
I've not studied English in 10 years.

I've not studied English for 10 years.

What's the difference?

Ite, maledicti, in ignem aeternum!
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 10:30:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
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Atatürk wrote:
I've not studied English in 10 years.

I've not studied English for 10 years.

What's the difference?


The difference is that you have changed the wording which changes the meaning of what is said.

"I've not been studying English in eight years." This sounds wrong because "studying" implies an active effort that is on-going. So you can't say you stopped doing something that you've continued doing in the past eight years.

"Studied" indicates an effort that came to an end. So there was a time of study, but it ended 10 years ago. In this case, "in" and "for" both indicate a 10 period when no study took place.



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 11:26:10 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/1/2018
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Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Atatürk wrote:
I've not studied English in 10 years.
I've not studied English for 10 years.

What's the difference?

'For' is more common and natural in BrE. though 'in' is not incorrect.I believe 'in' is more common in AmE, but we need a speaker of AmE to confirm this.
Atatürk
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 12:59:10 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2018
Posts: 1,381
Neurons: 5,395
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Thanks a lot.

Ite, maledicti, in ignem aeternum!
palapaguy
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 1:40:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
BobShilling wrote:
Atatürk wrote:
I've not studied English in 10 years.
I've not studied English for 10 years.

What's the difference?

'For' is more common and natural in BrE. though 'in' is not incorrect.I believe 'in' is more common in AmE, but we need a speaker of AmE to confirm this.


"In" and "for" are almost equally frequently used. The choice comes down to context. It is difficult to give examples of when one is preferred over the other.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, August 12, 2019 2:44:19 AM

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Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I would use "in" if the meaning is that you studied English from 2001 to 2009, but have not studied English between 2009 and 2019 (for example).

"I've not studied English in ten years." I studied English from 2001 to 2009.

I would use "for" if the meaning is that you have studied English between 2009 and 2019, but not every year.

"I've not studied English for ten years - I've only studied it only for six years."

***************
"I've studied English for ten years" means that, at some time since you were born, there was a ten-year period during which you studied English. If you were born in 1989 (for example):

I've studied English for ten years. I studied between 1999 and 2009.
I've studied English for ten years. I studied between 1995 and 2005.
I've studied English for the past ten years. I studied from 2009 to today.

***************
Personally, I'd just rephrase the sentence to make the differences more "obvious".
It's ten years since I last studied English.
or
"I've studied English for less than ten years.
depending on which I mean.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Atatürk
Posted: Tuesday, August 13, 2019 7:22:01 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/25/2018
Posts: 1,381
Neurons: 5,395
Location: İstanbul, Istanbul, Turkey
Thank you very much.

Ite, maledicti, in ignem aeternum!
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