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Is this sentence OK? Options
Born Villain
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 3:28:09 PM

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Hello. I just wanted to know if the bold part of the sentence is grammatically correct and sounds okay.

I will destroy everything that we had along with, even though chimerical, but hope that maybe someday we'll meet again.

Thanks in advance!
foolofgrace
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 3:35:48 PM

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I can't comment on correctness because I don't know what the sentence is trying to say.

Are you saying "I will destroy everything that we had along with us"? Like a suitcase?

Apart from that, the two ends of the sentence ("I will destroy everything that we had along with" and "but hope that maybe someday we'll meet again") don't seem to have anything to do with each other.
thar
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 3:49:00 PM

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I agree.

The bit outside the commas makes no sense.


And the bit inside the commas makes no sense.


So that's a "no".

I can't suggest improvements because I really don't get what you are trying to say.
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Saturday, August 10, 2019 2:35:24 AM

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Born Villain wrote:
Hello. I just wanted to know if the bold part of the sentence is grammatically correct and sounds okay.

I will destroy everything that we had along with, even though chimerical, but hope that maybe someday we'll meet again.

Thanks in advance!


Only you know what you are trying to say so you will have to find a simpler way of saying it.
Born Villain
Posted: Saturday, August 10, 2019 1:59:09 PM

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Thank you for your comments.
I've rephrased it. Does it makes sense now?

I will destroy everything that we had between us, along with the hope - a chimerical one but still hope - that maybe someday we'll meet again.

"Glossary", so to speak
everything that we had between us — their romance;
a chimerical one but still hope — specifies the kind of hope that's slim and weak; the meaning of the phrase is that even though this hope is slim, it's still a hope.
BobShilling
Posted: Saturday, August 10, 2019 2:42:09 PM
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Born Villain wrote:

I will destroy everything that we had between us, along with the hope - a chimerical one but still hope - that maybe someday we'll meet again.


That's a lot better, though that does suggest that you will also destroy the hope. Change 'along with' to 'except for'
Born Villain
Posted: Sunday, August 11, 2019 3:47:43 AM

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BobShilling, but that's the intended meaning: they will destroy everything that they had between them AND all the hope for ever meeting again.
jacobusmaximus
Posted: Tuesday, August 20, 2019 2:55:02 AM

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Born Villain wrote:
Thank you for your comments.
I've rephrased it. Does it makes sense now?

I will destroy everything that we had between us, along with the hope - a chimerical one but still hope - that maybe someday we'll meet again.

"Glossary", so to speak
everything that we had between us — their romance;
a chimerical one but still hope — specifies the kind of hope that's slim and weak; the meaning of the phrase is that even though this hope is slim, it's still a hope.


Yes, that makes sense now. Everything will be destroyed, even the illusion that they might one day get back together.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, August 20, 2019 7:38:15 AM
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B.V -

Are you familiar with the word "chimerical"? Is it one you use naturally in English conversation? Does it come up often?

I can't say its a word I ever remember using. From time to time I may use the word "Chimera" when it's needed. But have never needed to use "chimerical".

There are hosts of marvelous words in English - as in every language. Chimera is one. But, just because we come across a word we like, trying specifically to wriggle that word into our normal conversation usually doesn't work. It sticks out like a sore thumb - especially when used by a learner who is not yet at native-level.

The best way to speak English is to do so clearly, plainly and with no room for misunderstanding. Mastering plain words is the most valuable way to learn English. Plucking unusual words from random sources and embedding them in a sentences, unless we've come across them hundreds of times and are comfortable about knowing when they are most effectively used (and why!); is not a good idea - whether a native-speaker or learner. People think you are more interested in trying to impress them than in trying to communicate with them.

(That said - I'm aware that I might be mistaken and "chimerical" is a word you encounter frequently and use automatically.)
thar
Posted: Tuesday, August 20, 2019 7:58:48 AM

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I can see your reasoning, but it feels wrong to expect someone to restrict their vocabulary.

Must admit I initially wondered what on earth this had to do with chimeras, by apparently it has another meaning that does fit.


So, from a philosophical point, should you restrict your use of vocabulary just because other people probably don't know it? Or put it out there, and it is their choice to look it up and learn something new. Which s how we all learn, after all, by not knowing and asking.

I am not talking about showing off (if you write with any other aim than to communicate, that is bad writing). Or business communication (standard and formulaic gets the job done). But non-natives finding a word that fits the bill and using it, without checking to see if it is common enough?

Like I said, this isn't disagreeing - I can see your point, Rom. Especially in the learner context. But then what separates learners fro fluent speakers. Nothing inherent that I can think of. At what point does it become OK?

It just feels fundamentally wrong to advise anybody to restrict themselves, follow the herd 'dumb it down' even, when it comes to language use and self-expression. Only write what you have read, without investigating new words?
Find them but check them for audience recognition? Or just find them, stick them out there and let the reader do the work! Think
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 9:06:52 PM
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Ah no, mate, I would NEVER advise anyone not to grab hold of every new word they find.

My point has ALWAYS been that, English having the largest vocabulary of all languages, ensure there exists the exact, perfectly-formed word for each thing you want to say: the quintessential word that is the exact fit to express exactly what one means.

So "wasting" a perfectly good word when it isn't needed devalues it. You have to know exactly what a word means: its commonly understood meaning; and it's "exact" meaning; and it's age. So you read, listen, watch, and read about English as much as you can. BEACASUE the eventual aim is to be able to exactly and concisely express yourself.

But using a word simply because we happen to know it never really works.It usually's just not a good fit. As "chimera" above. There's nothing actually wrong with it, but it doesn't really fit. Not as well as a simple word like "Tiny" or "slender" could have expressed the tenuous fragility of the hope that had now been destroyed.

"Come quickly! The was a minor tremor when Dick went down to his shift and Jacob was about to place the nitro and he slipped and it fell from his hands..."

You'd know the word "explosion" was the exact, correct word in this circumastance and you'd yell "Come quickly, there's been an explosion.". And get an immediate response.

That's the background, at least, behind what informed my answer. I'm sure that, over the years, I've never given any indication of being restrictive - advising students, or colleagues, not to find as many different words as they can. In fact I carry my diary around to write new words that I find which I feel I mustn't forget. Currently my favourite is ""Alogotransiphobia" which is undoubtably the feeling which comes over me on the rare occasions I discover I haven't a book somewhere on my person: I go hot and cold all over,feel a sense of impending dread, and increasing panic!I know one day I'll get the chance to roll it out...and it will be the absolutely perfect word to use.

(I carted "defenestrate" around for a full 19 years until, at a rehearsal, the director called for everyone who was in the "Defenestration scene" and I realised my day had come at long last, as I confidently stepped forward. Song in my heart and all!)
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, August 21, 2019 11:51:22 PM

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Romany wrote:

(I carted "defenestrate" around for a full 19 years until, at a rehearsal, the director called for everyone who was in the "Defenestration scene" and I realised my day had come at long last, as I confidently stepped forward. Song in my heart and all!)



Mea culpa. I couldn't resist looking up "defenestrate." Must be the nerd in me. I found:

1. RARE
throw (someone) out of a window.
"she had made up her mind that the woman had been defenestrated, although the official verdict had been suicide"

2. INFORMAL
remove or dismiss (someone) from a position of power or authority.
"the overwhelming view is that he should be defenestrated before the next election"

I did this because I was curious about the similarity with "fenster," the German word for "window." To "de-window" someone kinda fits.

Interesting!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, August 22, 2019 1:18:01 PM
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Yep! In this play a woman in a wheelchair gets chucked out a window.

The post script came two days later when one of the girls told us she had been on The Oxford and found that "defenestrate" had been the most looked-up word for the past 24 hours.
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