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arising Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, August 8, 2019 4:30:38 AM
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https://web.archive.org/web/20080728061355/http://www.bartleby.com/64/C001/001.html

No other business arising, the meeting was adjourned.
Please explain the grammatical form and function of "arising".
BobShilling
Posted: Thursday, August 8, 2019 3:31:49 PM
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Jigneshbharati wrote:

Please explain the grammatical form and function of "arising".


What do you think?


If you are correct, it will give you some confidence in your own ability.

If you are incorrect, your answers might give us some idea of how we can help you.
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Thursday, August 8, 2019 3:53:37 PM
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Present participle modifying the noun "meeting" thus an adjective
Or
It could be an adverb of reason and thus answering the question- why the meeting was adjourned.
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 3:33:40 AM
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Location: Beroun, Stredocesky, Czech Republic
Jigneshbharati wrote:

No other business arising, the meeting was adjourned.

Please explain the grammatical form and function of "arising".


FORM: 'arising' is clearly an -ing form. How we label it is problematic. Many grammarians in recent times, including Quirk et al (1985) and Huddleston and Pullum (2002) see little point in attempting to distinguish between 'gerunds' and 'participles'. Unfortunately there is no universally accepted label for what I call '-ing forms'.

FUNCTION: I can see no way in which arising can be said to modify meetings

Huddleston and Pullum (2002.669 say of clauses similar to No other business arising that they 'can be construed as indicating temporal location and/or reason, [...] as manner perhaps but this is a matter of pragmatic inference: the semantic category is not explicitly marked either grammatically or lexically'.

So, it seems reasonable to think of No other business arising as non-finite clause functioning as an adjunct indicating reason. No other business is understood as the subject of arising, which functions as the (non-finite) verb-predicate in that clause.
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 3:42:10 AM
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Thanks
Audiendus
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 7:09:48 AM
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BobShilling wrote:
Huddleston and Pullum (2002.669 say of clauses similar to No other business arising that they 'can be construed as indicating temporal location and/or reason, [...] as manner perhaps but this is a matter of pragmatic inference: the semantic category is not explicitly marked either grammatically or lexically'.

So, it seems reasonable to think of No other business arising as non-finite clause functioning as an adjunct indicating reason. No other business is understood as the subject of arising, which functions as the (non-finite) verb-predicate in that clause.

Such phrases/clauses are sometimes called 'absolute' phrases/clauses. See the recent thread entitled "What is an absolute phrase, please?".
thar
Posted: Friday, August 9, 2019 7:27:30 AM

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I won't address the grammar, but a couple of other points.

Start with the meaning. Why do you adjourn a meeting? Because there is nothing else to discuss.

arise - come up, appear

The meeting was adjourned because people didn't bring up any other points to discuss.
The meeting was adjourned because no other business arose

A participal phrase will express that cause and effect:
No other business arising, the meeting was adjourned.

But also, this is the language of meetings.

"Matters arising" is the term for discussing the outcome of actions that were agreed upon at the last minute

AOB - "any other business" - is the time at the end of a meeting when people can bring up anything they want discussed that was not on the agenda.


Quote:
matters arising
noun [ plural ] UK ​ US ​

MEETINGS on an agenda (= the list of things to be discussed at a meeting), the opportunity for problems or questions from a previous meeting to be discussed :

There were no matters arising from the minutes of the previous meeting.



Quote:
any other business
noun [ U ] MEETINGS UK ​ US ​ (abbreviation AOB)

subjects that need to be discussed at a meeting after all the subjects on the agenda (= official list prepared before the meeting) have been discussed:

It's nearly time for lunch, so let's move to any other business.


So although the phrase is perfectly valid as a participle phrase of cause, it is complicated by the fixed language used in the setting of formal meetings.
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