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the common Options
lazarius
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 10:27:10 AM

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Quote:
For the rest the building is of stud-work and red brick, quaint and mellow looking, with many corners and gables that in summer are half hidden in roses and other creeping plants, and with its outlook on the marshes and the common where the lights vary continually with the seasons and even with the hours of the day, on the red roofs of Bungay town, and on the wooded bank that stretches round the Earsham lands; though there are many larger, to my mind there is none pleasanter in these parts.

Haggard, Henry Rider. Montezuma's Daughter (p. 4). Kindle Edition.

Do I understand it correctly that this is the same as the village green?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Village_green

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Romany
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 10:44:18 AM
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Well yes, you're right. It varies a little - most greens will have a pond somewhere with ducks/geese/swans, and a bench or two to sit on. But commons is a short word for 'common (shared) ground' so one doesn't particularly expect to find water on it, or benches and birds.

They were once used for very different purposes but as time goes on and their original purpose is no longer needed, the two words tend to become more and more interchangeable.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 10:47:18 AM

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Yes
A lot of places call the village green space the common. Although it can also be a larger patch of open land.

Grass, a few trees, maybe a cricket pitch. Maintained by the parish council.
Presumably a specific term originaly, meaning land common to everyone, where everyone had rights, like grazing their geese or whatever.


Edit

It might well be the green patch between the church and the school - but it can mean something wilder. In my part of Southern England there are several commons which are not inside vllages.

Eg, my local ones, within a short distance:

Quote:
Hankley Common is a 560-hectare (1,400-acre) nature reserve south-west of Elstead in Surrey. It is owned by the Ministry of Defence and managed by the Surrey Wildlife Trust.[1] The site is part of the Thursley, Hankley and Frensham Commons Special Area of Conservation,[2] Special Protection Area[3] and Site of Special Scientific Interest.[4]

The site has woodland and lowland heath with heather and gorse. Birds include nightjars and Dartford warblers and there are other fauna such as adders and common lizards.[1]


Quote:
Frensham Common is an English SSSI heathland of 922 acres (3.73 km2) owned by the National Trust which includes two large lakes and is managed by Waverley Borough Council and is almost wholly within Frensham, Surrey which is a nucleated village on alluvial soil narrowly buffered to the north-west, connected by a path. The local road network surrounds the site; the nearest trunk roads are 5 miles (8.0 km) away. The terrain is elevated and undulating — it has few streams due to the permeability of the soil[1] and high points in ridges to the south-east.[2]


Quote:
Crooksbury Common lie to the south of the Hog's Back and is a site of special scientific interest SSSI. The commons lies on greensand and is covered with heathland.


Quote:
Thursley Common is an area of some 350 hectares of heathland in the southwest of Surrey, England. It is protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest and as a national nature reserve.[2] Lying between the villages of Thursley and Elstead, the common is generally 2–300 feet above sea-level.
It is one of the last remaining heathlands in Surrey. It is famed for its diverse wildlife. Whilst crossbill, red kite, woodlark and stonechat are regularly seen, birds such as Dartford warbler, whinchat, wheatear, tree pipit and redstart are frequently encountered. Rarer birds including osprey, black redstart and great grey shrike also visit the common. The Common is also an ideal place to see viviparous lizard or common lizard.[citation needed]



These are not village greens, they are common land. Given that he is talking about 'the marshes' this may well be wilder than a village green.
lazarius
Posted: Wednesday, July 17, 2019 10:55:41 AM

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Thanks to you both.

thar wrote:
These are not village greens, they are common land. Given that he is talking about 'the marshes' this may well be wilder than a village green.

Got it. Thank you.

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Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 1:13:18 AM

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As far as I recall, one of the rights of residence was that your pigs were allowed to eat the acorns on the common - the right even had a name, "<something>age" (like "tillage" but not quite).

Aha! Found It - pannage.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
lazarius
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 2:29:35 AM

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Location: Kotel’niki, Moskovskaya, Russia
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Aha! Found It - pannage.

A very interesting article and another new word for me:

https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/mast

Quote:
mass noun

The fruit of beech, oak, chestnut, and other forest trees, especially as food for pigs.

Thank you.

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thar
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 4:24:26 AM

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Of course shared use of common resources is all good if there is social pressure not to abuse them, and a community incentive to preserve them for future generations.


But the opposite happens when it becomes 'I know I am overfishing/using too much water/destroying the land, but if I don't exhaust this resource then other people will, and there will be none left for me. It is going to be destroyed anyway, so I might as well profit by being the one destroying it. - The Tragedy of The Commons.


Quote:
The tragedy of the commons is a situation in a shared-resource system where individual users, acting independently according to their own self-interest, behave contrary to the common good of all users, by depleting or spoiling that resource through their collective action. The theory originated in an essay written in 1833 by the British economist William Forster Lloyd, who used a hypothetical example of the effects of unregulated grazing on common land (also known as a "common") in Great Britain and Ireland.[1] The concept became widely known as the "tragedy of the commons" over a century later due to an article written by the American ecologist and philosopher Garrett Hardin in 1968.[2] In this modern economic context, commons is taken to mean any shared and unregulated resource such as atmosphere, oceans, rivers, fish stocks, roads and highways, or even an office refrigerator.

The term is used in environmental science. The "tragedy of the commons" is often cited in connection with sustainable development, meshing economic growth and environmental protection, as well as in the debate over global warming. It has also been used in analyzing behavior in the fields of economics, evolutionary psychology, anthropology, game theory, politics, taxation and sociology.

Although common resource systems have been known to collapse due to overuse (such as in over-fishing), many examples have existed and still do exist where members of a community with access to a common resource co-operate or regulate to exploit those resources prudently without collapse.[3][4] Elinor Ostrom was awarded the Nobel Prize in economics for demonstrating exactly this concept in her book Governing the Commons, which included examples of how local communities were able to do this without top-down regulations.[5]

It has been argued that the very term "tragedy of the commons" is a misnomer since "the commons" referred to land resources with rights jointly owned by members of a community, and no individual outside the community had any access to the resource.[6] However, the term is now used in social science and economics when describing a problem where all individuals have equal and open access to a resource. Hence, "tragedy of open access regimes" or simply "the open access problem" are more apt terms.[7]


Yes, but tragedy of the commons is a catchier label. Whistle

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tragedy_of_the_commons
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, July 18, 2019 6:17:21 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
As far as I recall, one of the rights of residence was that your pigs were allowed to eat the acorns on the common - the right even had a name, "<something>age" (like "tillage" but not quite).

Aha! Found It - pannage.


There was more than just the right of pannage on common land in English law.

The right of Agisment, to graze cattle, sheep, horses etc.
The right of Estovers to collect firewood smalltresss brush etc.
The right of Turbage to collect soil for use in your own gardens or as fuel.
The right of Piscary to fish if there is a pond or lake.
The people of the New Forest called Verders still retain these rights.

http://www.verderers.org.uk/rights.html

Many of these were laid down in the Charter of the Forest, Carta Foresta in some ways a cousin to Magna Carta. Where Magna Carta has a great deal to say about the rights of Barons (which later have become more universal) the Carta Foresta gave more rights to the common man.

There are also some other ancient rights held in others parts of the UK such as the Freeminers of the Forest of Dean.
http://www.wyedeantourism.co.uk/freeminers
“To become a Freeminer
To become registered as a Freeminer:

A person must be born and live within the Hundred of St Briavels
Be over the age of 21 years
Have worked for a year and a day in a mine within the Hundred”

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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