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Do Black Holes die? Options
Blodybeef
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 6:45:42 AM

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Is it possible that the black holes swallow so much mass that they would eventually die? As an opposite of stars dying due to losing their mass?

Think





To water my question down a bit; Is it true "...with strange aeons even death may die."
d'oh!
mojomoyo
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 7:39:29 AM

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Yes, they do die. They lose energy all the time:

"Hawking radiation reduces the mass and energy of black holes and is therefore also known as black hole evaporation. Because of this, black holes that do not gain mass through other means are expected to shrink and ultimately vanish." (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawking_radiation)
Blodybeef
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 8:43:38 AM

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Quote:
...black holes that do not gain mass through other means are expected to shrink and ultimately vanish


So they literally eat themselves to death.

What I meant to ask was, can they ever reach the mass which is needed to become a star again (if at all possible), through swallowing matter, energy, gravity, mass, etc. from their surroundings.
towan52
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 9:07:21 AM

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They disappear into a black hole! In truth, I doubt anyone knows and any theories are likely to be pure conjecture.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 9:24:49 AM

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Blodybeef wrote:
Quote:
...black holes that do not gain mass through other means are expected to shrink and ultimately vanish


So they literally eat themselves to death.

What I meant to ask was, can they ever reach the mass which is needed to become a star again (if at all possible), through swallowing matter, energy, gravity, mass, etc. from their surroundings.


I don't think so the black hole Sagittarius A at the centre of our galaxy has an estimated mass of 2.6 million Solar Masses, if it was just a question of mass then it would be a massive sun.

Va
Posted: Friday, April 12, 2019 10:30:30 AM

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What I meant to ask was, can they ever reach the mass which is needed to become a star again (if at all possible), through swallowing matter, energy, gravity, mass, etc. from their surroundings. [/quote]

I don't think so the black hole Sagittarius A at the centre of our galaxy has an estimated mass of 2.6 million Solar Masses, if it was just a question of mass then it would be a massive sun.

[/quote]

They just can't. It is not purely a matter of mass, it is also "a matter of quality", so to say. To make it simple, stars born when a nuclear reaction starts as the result of a cloud of hydrogen collapsing on itself under its own gravity. The nuclear reaction then gives the energy and the pressure necessary to the balance of the star. In a black hole matter doesn't have the properties we know in normal life, there's nothing that could start a nuclear reaction, everything just ends up in the singularity
Clyde of Oz
Posted: Sunday, April 21, 2019 7:07:01 PM

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The idea that a black hole will ultimately vanish due to Hawking radiation is interesting, and probably correct, but the concept of ultimately is hard to come to grips with. The bigger the black hole, the longer it takes, and for a supermassive black hole we would be looking at 10^100 years to 10^106 years even if it 'devours' nothing else in the meantime. And it will be 'eating' at the very least cosmic background radiation, which would slow the process even further. These time scales are quite beyond human comprehension, and the time the universe has been in existence to date is utterly insignificant in comparison.
Islami
Posted: Thursday, May 2, 2019 11:36:03 AM
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Every poster is right as on date.
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