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provide a suitable date and time vs suggest a different date (and time) Options
Carmenex
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 9:48:44 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, February 9, 2019 12:09:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 9:03:42 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


Hi FounDit, and thank for your suggestions. Actually, I meant something a bit different; that expression is used in a letter with the meaning of: could you please (contact me by phone)/(phone me) on [day of the week], in the morning, or (could you, do you need?) indicate/suggest [by letter] a different date (and time) when I can (contact you by phone)/(phone you)?
What modifications would you suggest about it?
I would also please ask you what the difference between miss a (phone) call and cannot answer a (phone) call is?
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 12:53:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


Hi FounDit, and thank for your suggestions. Actually, I meant something a bit different; that expression is used in a letter with the meaning of: could you please (contact me by phone)/(phone me) on [day of the week], in the morning, or (could you, do you need?) indicate/suggest [by letter] a different date (and time) when I can (contact you by phone)/(phone you)?
What modifications would you suggest about it?
You have confused me a bit, or I'm being thick-headed this morning (meaning my mind isn't sharp). I had to read it 2 or 3 times to understand what you meant.

If I understand you correctly, you're asking for a way to seek communication, either by phone, or letter, for a date and time when you can contact the other person.

If I have that right, then I would suggest:

Could you please contact me by phone on [day of the week], in the morning, or by a letter, for a date and time when I can contact you by phone?

I would also please ask you what the difference between miss a (phone) call and cannot answer a (phone) call is?
"Miss a phone" call usually means not being near your phone and hearing it ring. And "cannot answer a call" would be used to indicate someone was busy, perhaps in a meeting, and could not take the call.

That said, both are often used as an excuse for not answering the phone. A person may have been sleeping, on the toilet, having sex, arguing with a spouse or partner, or just didn't feel like talking at the moment, and these excuses will often be used just to be polite.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 1:09:36 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


Hi FounDit, and thank for your suggestions. Actually, I meant something a bit different; that expression is used in a letter with the meaning of: could you please (contact me by phone)/(phone me) on [day of the week], in the morning, or (could you, do you need?) indicate/suggest [by letter] a different date (and time) when I can (contact you by phone)/(phone you)?
What modifications would you suggest about it?
You have confused me a bit, or I'm being thick-headed this morning (meaning my mind isn't sharp). I had to read it 2 or 3 times to understand what you meant.

If I understand you correctly, you're asking for a way to seek communication, either by phone, or letter, for a date and time when you can contact the other person.

If I have that right, then I would suggest:

Could you please contact me by phone on [day of the week], in the morning, or by a letter, for a date and time when I can contact you by phone?

I would also please ask you what the difference between miss a (phone) call and cannot answer a (phone) call is?
"Miss a phone" call usually means not being near your phone and hearing it ring. And "cannot answer a call" would be used to indicate someone was busy, perhaps in a meeting, and could not take the call.

That said, both are often used as an excuse for not answering the phone. A person may have been sleeping, on the toilet, having sex, arguing with a spouse or partner, or just didn't feel like talking at the moment, and these excuses will often be used just to be polite.


No, sorry, FounDit; I meant to say, in my letter to them, that they can phone me on [day of the week], in the morning; however, if they cannot on that day, they can reply to my letter specifying a date and time when I can phone them.
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 1:38:49 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


Hi FounDit, and thank for your suggestions. Actually, I meant something a bit different; that expression is used in a letter with the meaning of: could you please (contact me by phone)/(phone me) on [day of the week], in the morning, or (could you, do you need?) indicate/suggest [by letter] a different date (and time) when I can (contact you by phone)/(phone you)?
What modifications would you suggest about it?
You have confused me a bit, or I'm being thick-headed this morning (meaning my mind isn't sharp). I had to read it 2 or 3 times to understand what you meant.

If I understand you correctly, you're asking for a way to seek communication, either by phone, or letter, for a date and time when you can contact the other person.

If I have that right, then I would suggest:

Could you please contact me by phone on [day of the week], in the morning, or by a letter, for a date and time when I can contact you by phone?

I would also please ask you what the difference between miss a (phone) call and cannot answer a (phone) call is?
"Miss a phone" call usually means not being near your phone and hearing it ring. And "cannot answer a call" would be used to indicate someone was busy, perhaps in a meeting, and could not take the call.

That said, both are often used as an excuse for not answering the phone. A person may have been sleeping, on the toilet, having sex, arguing with a spouse or partner, or just didn't feel like talking at the moment, and these excuses will often be used just to be polite.


No, sorry, FounDit; I meant to say, in my letter to them, that they can phone me on [day of the week], in the morning; however, if they cannot on that day, they can reply to my letter specifying a date and time when I can phone them.
Ah, okay. Well, there are several ways to ask this. One might be:

"If at all possible, could you please phone me on, [day of the week], in the morning, for a suitable date and time when I can contact you?

If a call is not possible, would you please correspond with a letter for such a date and time when I can contact you?"



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, February 11, 2019 10:51:28 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


Hi FounDit, and thank for your suggestions. Actually, I meant something a bit different; that expression is used in a letter with the meaning of: could you please (contact me by phone)/(phone me) on [day of the week], in the morning, or (could you, do you need?) indicate/suggest [by letter] a different date (and time) when I can (contact you by phone)/(phone you)?
What modifications would you suggest about it?
You have confused me a bit, or I'm being thick-headed this morning (meaning my mind isn't sharp). I had to read it 2 or 3 times to understand what you meant.

If I understand you correctly, you're asking for a way to seek communication, either by phone, or letter, for a date and time when you can contact the other person.

If I have that right, then I would suggest:

Could you please contact me by phone on [day of the week], in the morning, or by a letter, for a date and time when I can contact you by phone?

I would also please ask you what the difference between miss a (phone) call and cannot answer a (phone) call is?
"Miss a phone" call usually means not being near your phone and hearing it ring. And "cannot answer a call" would be used to indicate someone was busy, perhaps in a meeting, and could not take the call.

That said, both are often used as an excuse for not answering the phone. A person may have been sleeping, on the toilet, having sex, arguing with a spouse or partner, or just didn't feel like talking at the moment, and these excuses will often be used just to be polite.


No, sorry, FounDit; I meant to say, in my letter to them, that they can phone me on [day of the week], in the morning; however, if they cannot on that day, they can reply to my letter specifying a date and time when I can phone them.
Ah, okay. Well, there are several ways to ask this. One might be:

"If at all possible, could you please phone me on, [day of the week], in the morning, for a suitable date and time when I can contact you?

If a call is not possible, would you please correspond with a letter for such a date and time when I can contact you?"



Thank you, FounDit. Actually, the reason why they should contact me is to discuss some issues, but they are aware of that. Can, therefore, the sentence be modified, as follows:
If at all possible, could you please phone me on, [day of the week], in the morning; if it is not possible, could you please specify such a date and time when I can contact you?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, February 11, 2019 11:00:03 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi, I would please ask you which of the expressions in bold is more appropriate (if any) in the following (it is meant to be used in a formal setting):
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) provide a suitable date and time when I can contact you?
Could you please contact me on [day of the week] in the morning, or (could you?) suggest a different date (and time) when I can contact you?


"Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, ..."
or,
"could you provide a suitable date and time ..."
are both okay. But for a formal construction, I would change the last bit of wording. The reason for doing that is because you want the other person to contact you for a particular reason. That reason may also be to do something.


Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to provide a suitable date and time for contacting/to contact you.

Could you please contact me on [day of the week], in the morning, to suggest a different date (and time) for contacting/to contact you?


Hi FounDit, and thank for your suggestions. Actually, I meant something a bit different; that expression is used in a letter with the meaning of: could you please (contact me by phone)/(phone me) on [day of the week], in the morning, or (could you, do you need?) indicate/suggest [by letter] a different date (and time) when I can (contact you by phone)/(phone you)?
What modifications would you suggest about it?
You have confused me a bit, or I'm being thick-headed this morning (meaning my mind isn't sharp). I had to read it 2 or 3 times to understand what you meant.

If I understand you correctly, you're asking for a way to seek communication, either by phone, or letter, for a date and time when you can contact the other person.

If I have that right, then I would suggest:

Could you please contact me by phone on [day of the week], in the morning, or by a letter, for a date and time when I can contact you by phone?

I would also please ask you what the difference between miss a (phone) call and cannot answer a (phone) call is?
"Miss a phone" call usually means not being near your phone and hearing it ring. And "cannot answer a call" would be used to indicate someone was busy, perhaps in a meeting, and could not take the call.

That said, both are often used as an excuse for not answering the phone. A person may have been sleeping, on the toilet, having sex, arguing with a spouse or partner, or just didn't feel like talking at the moment, and these excuses will often be used just to be polite.


No, sorry, FounDit; I meant to say, in my letter to them, that they can phone me on [day of the week], in the morning; however, if they cannot on that day, they can reply to my letter specifying a date and time when I can phone them.
Ah, okay. Well, there are several ways to ask this. One might be:

"If at all possible, could you please phone me on, [day of the week], in the morning, for a suitable date and time when I can contact you?

If a call is not possible, would you please correspond with a letter for such a date and time when I can contact you?"



Thank you, FounDit. Actually, the reason why they should contact me is to discuss some issues, but they are aware of that. Can, therefore, the sentence be modified, as follows:
If at all possible, could you please phone me on, [day of the week], in the morning; if it is not possible, could you please specify such a date and time when I can contact you?

Sure, that would work, I think. I might simplify it just a bit.

If possible, could you please phone me on, [day of the week], in the morning? If that's inconvenient, or not possible, could you please specify such a date and time when I can contact you?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 11:12:09 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?
Romany
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:35:54 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,380
Neurons: 48,295
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Business communications are expected to be factual and short. No-one has the time in a busy day to go poring over long, involved sentences.

No native speaker - especially a business person - would say "...On tuesday, in the morning." They'd say - and write - "Tuesday morning."

They wouldn't go into complicated /compound sentences - it's just not the way biz-speak (corporate jargon) works.

"Could you please phone me on Tuesday morning. If this isn't possible, please advise a convenient time at which I can contact you." "a convenient time" wipes out the need for "If this isn't conventient or not possible ('if this isn't possible) could you please specify such a date and time at which I can contact you, (please advise a convenient time for me to contact you.)

Short & factual. Because time is money and people resent wasting time.
FounDit
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:42:38 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?


You could say,

"Regardless of whether an exam is required or not"

or

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

or

"Regardless of whether or not an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

All of these can work.

For the next part, I think "do you know" and "are you aware" both work fine, but I would substitute the word "if" for "whether". I think it reads better that way.

Lastly, you might hear both words used, "with" and "to", but my personal preference is "to".


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Thursday, February 14, 2019 8:40:09 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
Romany wrote:
Business communications are expected to be factual and short. No-one has the time in a busy day to go poring over long, involved sentences.

No native speaker - especially a business person - would say "...On tuesday, in the morning." They'd say - and write - "Tuesday morning."

They wouldn't go into complicated /compound sentences - it's just not the way biz-speak (corporate jargon) works.

"Could you please phone me on Tuesday morning. If this isn't possible, please advise a convenient time at which I can contact you." "a convenient time" wipes out the need for "If this isn't conventient or not possible ('if this isn't possible) could you please specify such a date and time at which I can contact you, (please advise a convenient time for me to contact you.)

Short & factual. Because time is money and people resent wasting time.


Hi Romany, and thank you for your advice.
Carmenex
Posted: Friday, February 15, 2019 10:44:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?


You could say,

"Regardless of whether an exam is required or not"

or

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

or

"Regardless of whether or not an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

All of these can work.

For the next part, I think "do you know" and "are you aware" both work fine, but I would substitute the word "if" for "whether". I think it reads better that way.

Lastly, you might hear both words used, "with" and "to", but my personal preference is "to".


Thank you, FounDit. Only one question: with regard to the second option for the first part of the sentence, did you mean:

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required or not/you need to take an exam or you do not"?
FounDit
Posted: Friday, February 15, 2019 11:18:41 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?


You could say,

"Regardless of whether an exam is required or not"

or

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

or

"Regardless of whether or not an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

All of these can work.

For the next part, I think "do you know" and "are you aware" both work fine, but I would substitute the word "if" for "whether". I think it reads better that way.

Lastly, you might hear both words used, "with" and "to", but my personal preference is "to".


Thank you, FounDit. Only one question: with regard to the second option for the first part of the sentence, did you mean:

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required or not/you need to take an exam or you do not"?

As I read it, the main idea in the first part is: "regardless of the fact whether an exam is required or not". This means that there should be no regard given to the fact, or idea, or an exam. If an exam is required, you would have to take it. If an exam is not required, then no problem. But the idea expressed is that this is not important. You do not regard that fact either way. The important part is: do you know if the degree is acceptable in countries x, y, and z?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 10:48:15 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?


You could say,

"Regardless of whether an exam is required or not"

or

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

or

"Regardless of whether or not an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

All of these can work.

For the next part, I think "do you know" and "are you aware" both work fine, but I would substitute the word "if" for "whether". I think it reads better that way.

Lastly, you might hear both words used, "with" and "to", but my personal preference is "to".


Thank you, FounDit. Only one question: with regard to the second option for the first part of the sentence, did you mean:

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required or not/you need to take an exam or you do not"?

As I read it, the main idea in the first part is: "regardless of the fact whether an exam is required or not". This means that there should be no regard given to the fact, or idea, or an exam. If an exam is required, you would have to take it. If an exam is not required, then no problem. But the idea expressed is that this is not important. You do not regard that fact either way. The important part is: do you know if the degree is acceptable in countries x, y, and z?


I agree, FounDit, with you about the meaning of the sentence, I would only please ask you why you included or not in "Regardless of whether an exam is required or not", but omitted it in "Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, February 18, 2019 11:14:17 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?


You could say,

"Regardless of whether an exam is required or not"

or

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

or

"Regardless of whether or not an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

All of these can work.

For the next part, I think "do you know" and "are you aware" both work fine, but I would substitute the word "if" for "whether". I think it reads better that way.

Lastly, you might hear both words used, "with" and "to", but my personal preference is "to".


Thank you, FounDit. Only one question: with regard to the second option for the first part of the sentence, did you mean:

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required or not/you need to take an exam or you do not"?

As I read it, the main idea in the first part is: "regardless of the fact whether an exam is required or not". This means that there should be no regard given to the fact, or idea, or an exam. If an exam is required, you would have to take it. If an exam is not required, then no problem. But the idea expressed is that this is not important. You do not regard that fact either way. The important part is: do you know if the degree is acceptable in countries x, y, and z?


I agree, FounDit, with you about the meaning of the sentence, I would only please ask you why you included or not in "Regardless of whether an exam is required or not", but omitted it in "Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"?

I was simply offering you two ways to say the same thing.
For example:
Regardless of whether or not the car is a Lotus, take it to be washed.
Regardless of the make of the car, take it to be washed.

In both cases, you are saying to someone they should have no regard to what kind of car it is. In your example, you are saying they should have no regard for an exam.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 11:22:33 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Thank you, FounDit. In your opinion, are the expressions in bold correct in the following sentences (which are meant to be used in a formal setting):
Regardless of whether/(the fact that) an exam (is required)/(you need to take) an exam (or not), (do you know)/(are you aware) whether the degree would be recognized in such countries as X, Y, Z, ...
Sorry, I missed your call. What did you need to talk to/with me about?


You could say,

"Regardless of whether an exam is required or not"

or

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

or

"Regardless of whether or not an exam is required/you need to take an exam"

All of these can work.

For the next part, I think "do you know" and "are you aware" both work fine, but I would substitute the word "if" for "whether". I think it reads better that way.

Lastly, you might hear both words used, "with" and "to", but my personal preference is "to".


Thank you, FounDit. Only one question: with regard to the second option for the first part of the sentence, did you mean:

"Regardless of the fact an exam is required or not/you need to take an exam or you do not"?

As I read it, the main idea in the first part is: "regardless of the fact whether an exam is required or not". This means that there should be no regard given to the fact, or idea, or an exam. If an exam is required, you would have to take it. If an exam is not required, then no problem. But the idea expressed is that this is not important. You do not regard that fact either way. The important part is: do you know if the degree is acceptable in countries x, y, and z?


I agree, FounDit, with you about the meaning of the sentence, I would only please ask you why you included or not in "Regardless of whether an exam is required or not", but omitted it in "Regardless of the fact an exam is required/you need to take an exam"?

I was simply offering you two ways to say the same thing.
For example:
Regardless of whether or not the car is a Lotus, take it to be washed.
Regardless of the make of the car, take it to be washed.

In both cases, you are saying to someone they should have no regard to what kind of car it is. In your example, you are saying they should have no regard for an exam.


Thank you, FounDit. I have now gotten it (is that expression correct?).
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, February 19, 2019 11:53:24 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
The most common expressions are:
I've got it now.
I have it now.
or, sometimes simply saying, "got it," meaning I understand.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 10:12:30 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
In view of these facts and others (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she strongly believes that she deserves that her application to be progressed and (she, is it required?) be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. This would allow her to further demonstrate (a possible synonym?) her suitability for the role, (something?) which she is firmly convinced of and which the attendance of the selection process has confirmed in her conviction in.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 3:20:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 4:41:07 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. Only two questions: with regard to her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box, it has not previously been noted or described; therefore, can it be included as follows:
In view of these facts and others (or other ones?) (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she is ...
Regarding the last part, I meant something slightly different:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
What do you think about that?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, March 18, 2019 10:24:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. Only two questions: with regard to her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box, it has not previously been noted or described; therefore, can it be included as follows:
In view of these facts and others (or other ones?) (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she is ...
If her ingenuity and capacity to think out of the box has not been noted or demonstrated, how can these be included? It is simply an assertion with no evidence to back up such a statement.

Regarding the last part, I meant something slightly different:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
What do you think about that?

I'm not clear on the "attendance of the selection process". Did she attend some type of selection process already, or does she believe that her suitability makes her a candidate for such a selection process? And how would she "attend" such a process? I'm not clear on what you want to say here.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Tuesday, March 19, 2019 11:45:11 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. Only two questions: with regard to her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box, it has not previously been noted or described; therefore, can it be included as follows:
In view of these facts and others (or other ones?) (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she is ...
If her ingenuity and capacity to think out of the box has not been noted or demonstrated, how can these be included? It is simply an assertion with no evidence to back up such a statement.

Regarding the last part, I meant something slightly different:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
What do you think about that?

I'm not clear on the "attendance of the selection process". Did she attend some type of selection process already, or does she believe that her suitability makes her a candidate for such a selection process? And how would she "attend" such a process? I'm not clear on what you want to say here.


Yes, she has already attended some type of selection process; and I want to say that the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction about her suitability for the role. How would you include in the sentence:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, March 19, 2019 12:15:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. Only two questions: with regard to her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box, it has not previously been noted or described; therefore, can it be included as follows:
In view of these facts and others (or other ones?) (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she is ...
If her ingenuity and capacity to think out of the box has not been noted or demonstrated, how can these be included? It is simply an assertion with no evidence to back up such a statement.

Regarding the last part, I meant something slightly different:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
What do you think about that?

I'm not clear on the "attendance of the selection process". Did she attend some type of selection process already, or does she believe that her suitability makes her a candidate for such a selection process? And how would she "attend" such a process? I'm not clear on what you want to say here.


Yes, she has already attended some type of selection process; and I want to say that the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction about her suitability for the role. How would you include in the sentence:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.


Hmmm, well, I think I might move that latter part. I'm trying to keep as much as your own wording as possible, but make it read a bit smoother.

I suggest something like:

If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, since attendance at the selection process has reinforced her firm belief that she will excel in the position.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Tuesday, March 19, 2019 12:21:41 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. Only two questions: with regard to her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box, it has not previously been noted or described; therefore, can it be included as follows:
In view of these facts and others (or other ones?) (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she is ...
If her ingenuity and capacity to think out of the box has not been noted or demonstrated, how can these be included? It is simply an assertion with no evidence to back up such a statement.

Regarding the last part, I meant something slightly different:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
What do you think about that?

I'm not clear on the "attendance of the selection process". Did she attend some type of selection process already, or does she believe that her suitability makes her a candidate for such a selection process? And how would she "attend" such a process? I'm not clear on what you want to say here.


Yes, she has already attended some type of selection process; and I want to say that the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction about her suitability for the role. How would you include in the sentence:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.


Hmmm, well, I think I might move that latter part. I'm trying to keep as much as your own wording as possible, but make it read a bit smoother.

I suggest something like:

If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, since attendance at the selection process has reinforced her firm belief that she will excel in the position.


Thank you, FounDit, for your suggestions. I noticed that you omitted the before attendance, would it be incorrect including it?
With regard to In view of these facts and others (including ...), I understand your reasoning; however, from a linguistic point of view, is the expression correct, or should or other ones be used?
FounDit
Posted: Tuesday, March 19, 2019 12:45:30 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, I would please ask you if the expressions in bold are correct in the following:
I'm not sure you want to word it quite like this. It has the sense of a command, an order for her application to be processed, and to be interviewed by a company leader. I doubt that would accomplish what is desired. In applying for a position, a polite request would go much farther.

Also, I'm not sure if her "demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box" has previously been noted or described. If it has, then I wouldn't mention it again here.

Keeping most of your words, I suggest:


In view of these facts, she is exceedingly hopeful that her application will be processed and that she will be offered the opportunity to discuss her work with one of the company's leaders. If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and be of great benefit to the company..


Thank you, FounDit, for your advice. Only two questions: with regard to her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think outside the box, it has not previously been noted or described; therefore, can it be included as follows:
In view of these facts and others (or other ones?) (including her demonstrated ingenuity and capacity to think out of box), she is ...
If her ingenuity and capacity to think out of the box has not been noted or demonstrated, how can these be included? It is simply an assertion with no evidence to back up such a statement.

Regarding the last part, I meant something slightly different:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.
What do you think about that?

I'm not clear on the "attendance of the selection process". Did she attend some type of selection process already, or does she believe that her suitability makes her a candidate for such a selection process? And how would she "attend" such a process? I'm not clear on what you want to say here.


Yes, she has already attended some type of selection process; and I want to say that the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction about her suitability for the role. How would you include in the sentence:
If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, in which she firmly believes she will excel, and about which (i.e. about her suitability for ...) the attendance of the selection process has reinforced her conviction.


Hmmm, well, I think I might move that latter part. I'm trying to keep as much as your own wording as possible, but make it read a bit smoother.

I suggest something like:

If permitted, such an opportunity would allow her to further demonstrate her suitability for the position, since attendance at the selection process has reinforced her firm belief that she will excel in the position.


Thank you, FounDit, for your suggestions. I noticed that you omitted the before attendance, would it be incorrect including it?
It isn't necessary in the wording I used. To put it in would sound odd. Simply saying attendance at the selection process is all that is necessary, because it was not "the" particular attendance that is the point; just attendance.

With regard to In view of these facts and others (including ...), I understand your reasoning; however, from a linguistic point of view, is the expression correct, or should or other ones be used?

The phrase is, indeed, "In view of these facts", but as I said, I see no reason to use it here since no facts have been presented. Besides that point, using this wording has a sense of arrogance to it in a job application. It could easily be taken to mean, "I deserve this, so give it to me".


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2019 9:46:07 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
Hi FounDit, could I please ask you if the following sentences are correct:
Because, instead of complaining about (the?) past or worrying about (the?) future, the beauty of living (the?) present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, March 24, 2019 11:24:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, could I please ask you if the following sentences are correct:
Because, instead of complaining about (the?) past or worrying about (the?) future, the beauty of living (the?) present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


Standing alone, it is very awkward and sounds a bit strange. The basic sentence is, "Because ... the present captures/seizes us".

"Because" is usually a conjunction that means, "as a result of", or "for this reason". It could fit here, but since there has been no statement going before it, someone hearing or reading it might be confused.

More context would help greatly, I believe. But as it stands, the only word I would add would be "in". And either "captures" or "seizes" will work.

Because, instead of complaining about the past, or worrying about the future, the beauty of living in the present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Carmenex
Posted: Sunday, March 31, 2019 1:01:44 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/7/2014
Posts: 1,051
Neurons: 5,557
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, could I please ask you if the following sentences are correct:
Because, instead of complaining about (the?) past or worrying about (the?) future, the beauty of living (the?) present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


Standing alone, it is very awkward and sounds a bit strange. The basic sentence is, "Because ... the present captures/seizes us".

"Because" is usually a conjunction that means, "as a result of", or "for this reason". It could fit here, but since there has been no statement going before it, someone hearing or reading it might be confused.

More context would help greatly, I believe. But as it stands, the only word I would add would be "in". And either "captures" or "seizes" will work.

Because, instead of complaining about the past, or worrying about the future, the beauty of living in the present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


Thank you, FounDit. Sorry, I meant to say (it is a prayer):
Instead of complaining about the past, or worrying about the future, in order that the beauty of living in the present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.
FounDit
Posted: Monday, April 1, 2019 4:41:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,635
Neurons: 54,701
Carmenex wrote:
FounDit wrote:
Carmenex wrote:
Hi FounDit, could I please ask you if the following sentences are correct:
Because, instead of complaining about (the?) past or worrying about (the?) future, the beauty of living (the?) present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


Standing alone, it is very awkward and sounds a bit strange. The basic sentence is, "Because ... the present captures/seizes us".

"Because" is usually a conjunction that means, "as a result of", or "for this reason". It could fit here, but since there has been no statement going before it, someone hearing or reading it might be confused.

More context would help greatly, I believe. But as it stands, the only word I would add would be "in". And either "captures" or "seizes" will work.

Because, instead of complaining about the past, or worrying about the future, the beauty of living in the present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


Thank you, FounDit. Sorry, I meant to say (it is a prayer):
Instead of complaining about the past, or worrying about the future, in order that the beauty of living in the present captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


When you begin with "Instead of", you are setting up a contrast between two things. But in this case, it is, "instead of this, experience this".

So you can simply say, "Instead of complaining about the past, or worrying about the future, it is experiencing the beauty of living in the present that captures/seizes us. Let us pray.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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