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laced tea Options
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 8:48:56 AM

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Hello again!

This is a line from "Belladonna" by U.F.O.

The tea is delicately laced

The only meaning of the verb to lace in the TFD that fits is this:

lace
(leɪs)

vb

8. (tr) to add a small amount of alcohol or drugs to (food or drink)

What kind of alcohol drink would that normally be? Cognac? Whisky? I don't think wine would work, would it?
towan52
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 9:52:27 AM

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Hi Kirill,
I enjoy your posts!

I don't know the context of the song, but from personal experience, scotch whisky or dark rum are excellent additives especially on a cold day!


"Of all the liars in the world, sometimes the worst are your own fears. ~ Rudyard Kipling "
thar
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 9:55:10 AM

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laced doesn't just refer to alcohol

eg
Quote:
The number of overdoses involving Fentanyl-Laced Cocaine has skyrocketed in the last few years. Many users don't realize cocaine has been contaminated...


Quote:
For an unexpected Thanksgiving dessert, serve up a warm pear pie laced with ginger


Quote:
The ex-KGB spy poisoned by tea laced with a radioactive isotope


Quote:
Our teas are blended here in Lincolnshire using hand-selected fine leaf teas. ... Our blend has a biscuity flavour laced with notes of malt and can be enjoyed at ...


Quote:
Tea & THC: Lady Entrepreneurs Aim to Take Your Happy Hour Higher ...
https://www.kqed.org/.../tea-thc-lady-entrepreneurs-aim-to-micro-dose-your-happy-h...
16 Nov 2017 - Amanda Jones (l) and Jennifer Chapin (r) co-founded Kikoko, a startup serving teas mildly laced with marijuana designed to appeal to women ...


So it depends on the context - what fits here? Yes, if it is alcohol then spirits is the most obvious - but to each their own. But it could be something more hallucinogenic - or just a more complex taste!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 10:03:41 AM
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It's the only meaning I know of. As the lyrics refer later to the "poison" we can see he's not talking about alcohol but about drugs/poison.

Did you not have the rohypnol thing happening in Russia? This was when what has been called the "date-rape drug" (rohypnol) was being put into (mainly) women's drinks to render them half-unconscious and rapable. In these cases it was their alcoholic drinks that were being laced. In these cases, as with poison, it is crucial that the person drinking it doesn't know it's there.

But it wouldn't be possible to add any booze at all to tea that would not be instantly both smelt and tasted. So, usually when we talk about lacing someone's tea with booze (yes, either brandy or whiskey. i.e. a spirit. Wine would, I would think, make it taste absolutely nauseating!), it's because they've had a shock; or become thoroughly chilled by exposure to bad weather conditions; or even if they simply have a cold. It's a habit that has been around about as long as tea has - at least in the UK. So while we may say "I feel much better now I've drunk the tea that Harry laced for me when I came in." and everyone understands, there's nothing secretive or underhand about it.

Whereas to lace any kind of drink at all with drugs is a criminal act and usually it's administered either to kill someone - or to enable the person to be raped.

EDITED TO ADD: Sorry, seems others had responded while I was still writing.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 12:26:59 PM

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Further to Romanys answer although Bella Donna translated in English means beautiful lady, in this case it could be a reference to the plant Atropa belladonna, commonly know in British English as Deadly Nightshade a highly poisonous plant.

https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/natural/531.html

In this context the tea would be laced not with an alcoholic spirit but with a derivative of Belladonna, or a clever songwriter will use a double meaning talking both about a beautiful woman and the poison.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Jagadeesh Bangalore
Posted: Thursday, February 7, 2019 12:48:30 PM

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Also, Belladonna is a homeopathic drug, quite commonly used.

To 'BE' or to 'AE' ?!!
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 4:13:48 AM

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Wow, this has proven one of those simple questions that make come out a great amount of interesting information! Dancing

Thank you all.

So I understand this is a great verb whose function goes far beyond adding whiskey to tea on a cold day. It's more like adding a small element that gives a new quality to the whole thing. Correct?

Quote:

Romany wrote:
Did you not have the rohypnol thing happening in Russia? This was when what has been called the "date-rape drug" (rohypnol) was being put into (mainly) women's drinks to render them half-unconscious and rapable. In these cases it was their alcoholic drinks that were being laced. In these cases, as with poison, it is crucial that the person drinking it doesn't know it's there.


I've never heard of this particular substance, and I personally don't use any chemical stimulus beyond normal alcohol to help women relax. But I am aware of such practices of course. The thing we did have here in Russia in 1990s was girls (usually presenting themselves as prostitutes) lacing clients' drinks with clophelin and then robbing them. I wasn't lucky enough to have the kind of money one needed to make himself a target of that.

Quote:

Sarrriesfan wrote:
Further to Romanys answer although Bella Donna translated in English means beautiful lady, in this case it could be a reference to the plant Atropa belladonna, commonly know in British English as Deadly Nightshade a highly poisonous plant.



Thanks! So there seems to be a clever play on words here.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, February 10, 2019 1:45:49 PM

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If you're interested, you can also lace meat. It's called that because the substance used (fat) LOOKS like lace. You buy it as 'lace-fat' or 'caul-fat'.

Quote:
Lean meat can dry out when cooking, like game meat. Wrapping something in caul before cooking it will allow the fat to insulate it. Eventually the caul melts and bastes the meat while it cooks, transferring a subtle flavor to whatever it’s wrapping.
Forager Chef

This is what the fat looks like when you get it:



As you said, it's adding a small amount of something which changes the quality (of the meat).

**************
Belladonna is called that (I believe) because it has the effect (one of its effects) of dilating the pupils of the eyes. Apparently "in the old days" some Italian ladies used to take it to make their eyes look beautiful.
Quote:
In Renaissance Italy, the counterparts of Ottoman women used belladonna to appear more attractive. Belladonna is Italian for beautiful lady. . . .
With one drop in both eyes, belladonna dilated their pupils, simulating the natural state of arousal where a person's pupils dilated.
History and Women

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, February 11, 2019 4:54:16 AM

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Atropine, taken from belladonna, is also used as an emergency first-aid counter to exposure to chemical warfare nerve agents, antispasmodic drug.

(BTW, in Finnish we call it myrkkykoiso or lemmonruoho, something like poison plant or devil's plant.
AND, to the same family belongs some useful plants like tomatoes, potatoes, eggplant, tobacco... ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
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