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Can yeasts move around? Options
Atatürk
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 10:09:59 AM

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The rat findings have been replicated many times and extended to creatures ranging from yeast to fruit flies, worms, fish, spiders, mice and hamsters.

Oxford dictionary:

Creature: a living thing that can move around.

But can yeasts move around?

Ite, maledicti, in ignem aeternum!
Beth Rosser
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 10:33:28 AM

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Yeast does not move it grows and spreads. It can be transferred from place to place on the body. Unless you are talking about bakers yeast.
Atatürk
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 10:54:34 AM

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So why has the write considered it as a kind of creature?

Ite, maledicti, in ignem aeternum!
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 11:00:09 AM

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Yeast is a living thing, a creature. It doesn't walk like us, or bike. But it can swim and concuer the mountains.

In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
thar
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 11:02:25 AM

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Yes, yeast can move.
They can bud, but they can also mate. Incentive! Whistle

RuthP
Posted: Friday, February 8, 2019 12:09:10 PM

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Atatürk wrote:
So why has the write considered it as a kind of creature?

Probably because yeast are not plants and the writer forgot to use "organism". The definition of "creature" you cite is really most applicable to macroscopic organisms, the dog vs. tree kind of distinction.

What one calls microorganisms has always been a bit of an issue. It is said van Leuwenhoek called the microbes he saw with one of his early microscopes "wretched beasties". I doubt his early scopes were good enough to tell the difference between motility and Brownian motion. And, classifications change. After all, the blue-green algae were plants for much of my life, and now they are cyanobacteria.
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