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Looking for word that means Naturally Easily Recovered/Remedied or Easily Healed/Cured. Quickly Repa Options
Accountably
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2019 2:20:32 PM
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Joined: 1/27/2019
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Hello, All,

I have been looking for an English word that means possibly "quickly and easily recovered by nature" or "has an inherent ability to bounce back or be repaired, possibly even by design, after damage". I don't mind if the word has connotations of mechanical or even biological nature. As a note I am not looking for a synonym of "robust" or "durable" as that connotes an ability to withstand damage or catastrophic change. Moreover I find the words "resilient" and "adaptable" to also connote imperviousness a bit too much (despite online definitions of resilient describing what I seek). More something that exudes "effortlessly remedied or cured".

I suppose I am looking for a synonym of elastic or elasticity but one that connotes a sense of repair with ease as opposed to just returning to an original state. However thus far, elastic has been the closest in my opinion.

Many Thanks!
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2019 4:27:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 11,180
Neurons: 56,832
Accountably wrote:
Hello, All,

I have been looking for an English word that means possibly "quickly and easily recovered by nature" or "has an inherent ability to bounce back or be repaired, possibly even by design, after damage". I don't mind if the word has connotations of mechanical or even biological nature. As a note I am not looking for a synonym of "robust" or "durable" as that connotes an ability to withstand damage or catastrophic change. Moreover I find the words "resilient" and "adaptable" to also connote imperviousness a bit too much (despite online definitions of resilient describing what I seek). More something that exudes "effortlessly remedied or cured".

I suppose I am looking for a synonym of elastic or elasticity but one that connotes a sense of repair with ease as opposed to just returning to an original state. However thus far, elastic has been the closest in my opinion.

Many Thanks!


Regenerate, rejuvenate,repair, restore, remedy, revivify, any of these work for you?


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2019 5:37:22 PM

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resilient

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
Parpar1836
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2019 6:29:02 PM
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Location: Rochester, New York, United States
resurgent
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 7:36:40 AM

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Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
Some lizards have this ability called autotomy. They might shed part of their tail if attacked, and then regenerate the missing part.


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Accountably
Posted: Monday, January 28, 2019 8:54:48 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/27/2019
Posts: 2
Neurons: 8
Thanks for the replies everyone. Regenerate, or in the adjective case, Regenerative or Regenerateable, while an option seemed to connote "automation" a bit too much. It's definitely in the correct vein however. I am wanting to sell and to give the sense that an end user can fix damage or critical errors they've created with ease. The product won't fix itself however. It can be tinkered with more than most and will certainly break just like any similar product but it's unique selling point is that it can be dynamically corrected without and deep knowledge or years of experience that would normally be required.

Resurgent is an interesting choice. I think the meaning is closer to what I want, if a bit epic.

Resilient doesn't work for me since as I noted it connotes too much of imperviousness to damage in my opinion even though the technical definition seems to be perfect.

I am oddly still leaning toward "elastic" at this point. I have also considered Pliant, curative, remedial, amendatory, and reformative. I actually liked reformative the most of those in terms how I believe it comes off, but for me of everything, I think elastic is still the winner.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2019 3:41:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
As Frosty mentioned, and as you say, the word which means EXACTLY what you describe (if you were describing a person) is:

re·sil·ient adj.
1. Capable of returning to an original shape or position, as after having been compressed.
2. Able to recover readily, as from misfortune.

American Heritage
2. (of a person) recovering easily and quickly from shock, illness, hardship, etc; irrepressible
Collins English Dictionary
2. recovering readily from illness, adversity, or the like.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary

However, if that doesn't suit you, "buoyant" or "elastic" are about the best I can see.

"Buoyant" has the disadvantage that (like resilient) it is sometimes used to mean "not affected by misfortune or damage", rather than "recovering quickly and easily from damage".

However, you say it's something you want to sell - like a machine or a vehicle, I guess.

"Easily repaired" or "simply repaired" or "easily repairable" probably communicate the idea better than any single word.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope123
Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2019 6:04:25 PM

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If it's of any help, they talk about "plasticity" of the brain so maybe that would fit in other situations.

"The louder he talked of his honor, the faster we counted our spoons." Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882)
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, January 31, 2019 6:27:36 PM

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Joined: 3/30/2016
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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
However in geology and other areas such as metallurgy plastic deformation is used to mean changes in size or shape of an material, caused by stresses such as load that have occurred that mean the material does not return to the original state.

Elastic deformation is tne phase when the material will return to the previous state after the stress has ceased.

If enough stress is out on the material eventually it will reach the point of brittle failure and fractures will occur.

It's intresting how in different fields the term can be used subtlety differently in the terms of neuroscience brain plasticity is a good thing the ability to mould itself into new forms allows the brain to compensate after injuries such as strokes.

I guess in terms of a material the degree to which it has plasticity is useful depends on the use it is intended for molten glass has plasticity and that is a good thing when you are making window panes. Yet when the glass has cooled down we don't want it to take new forms easily.

Springs in a mattress are good at elastic deformation when you sleep on them your weight compresses them and yet they spring back later.

I would agree with Dragos suggestions for a machine "easily repaired"," simply repaired " or easily repairable" are good.

Elastic does not really work for me as it denotes the ability to return to the original form by itself without needing input from outside help.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
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