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Yes and yes Options
coag
Posted: Friday, January 25, 2019 3:11:01 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2010
Posts: 1,198
Neurons: 6,438
Hello all,

I was repairing a machine and I got an email from a manager, asking: "Did we replace the lamp?"
I replied: "I didn't replace the lamp. Do you want it be replaced?"
He answered: "Yes and yes."

What does "Yes and yes" mean? (The guy is a native English speaker). It seems rude to me. I asked one question, one "yes" is sufficient as an answer. Unless he meant "definitely yes".

PS
The management where I work often use weasel words and that drives me crazy. One example is using "we" instead of "you".
He should've asked: "Did you replace the lamp?". He didn't do anything, I was the only one repairing the machine.
thar
Posted: Friday, January 25, 2019 3:18:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 19,834
Neurons: 80,175
"Yes and yes" is not a way of saying an emphatic yes, to me. Maybe in his idiom.

To me it is the way you would answer two questions in order - only there is no 'first question' from you.
Maybe they have misread something and invented another question to which the answer was 'yes'?


You can think of the 'we' as being inclusive and team-building - or as them being a prick.

Regardless of what he meant by this odd 'yes and yes', just the 'yes' on its own is rude. Feel sorry for him that he is so stressed or poorly raised he can't even be polite in an email. Whistle


coag
Posted: Friday, January 25, 2019 5:04:59 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2010
Posts: 1,198
Neurons: 6,438
Thank you very much, thar, for your response.
palapaguy
Posted: Friday, January 25, 2019 10:17:44 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 1,566
Neurons: 12,830
Location: Calabasas, California, United States
coag wrote:
Hello all,

I was repairing a machine and I got an email from a manager, asking: "Did we replace the lamp?"
I replied: "I didn't replace the lamp. Do you want it be replaced?"
He answered: "Yes and yes."

What does "Yes and yes" mean? (The guy is a native English speaker). It seems rude to me. I asked one question, one "yes" is sufficient as an answer. Unless he meant "definitely yes".

PS
The management where I work often use weasel words and that drives me crazy. One example is using "we" instead of "you".
He should've asked: "Did you replace the lamp?". He didn't do anything, I was the only one repairing the machine.


My guess is that he believed (rightly or wrongly) that the subject had been discussed earlier and should have been concluded at that earlier time. He may have felt that he was being asked to repeat himself. Getting older will do that to ya. Anxious
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, January 26, 2019 4:45:02 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 32,773
Neurons: 201,846
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I have two explanations (both showing slight mis-use of English or probably use of 'corporatese' instead of English).

My guess on the two 'yeses' is that the first is a bad acknowledgement, and the second is an answer.
The acknowledgement (for your answer) would be better as an "OK" or "All right".

In a conversation it would be (more correctly, but still lacking politeness ):
"Did you replace the lamp?"
"I didn't replace the lamp."
"Oh, OK."
"Do you want it be replaced?"
"Yes."


You're lucky you got an active question with 'we'.
Most 'corporatese' grammar precludes (rules out) the active voice completely and makes everything passive (with no "agent" to take the blame at all - "Nothing to do with me, it happened, I didn't DO anything").

"Was the lamp replaced?"
"No it wasn't."
"OK"
"Should it be replaced?"
"That might be a good idea."

"The lamp" is the subject. It's the only thing causing anything - your boss (and you) seem to be simply THERE observing.

The way I like to work is rather more direct, but (in the British way) without orders.

"Did you replace the lamp?"
"No, the old one was still working."
"OK, but it's probably a good idea to put a new one in, if you will."
"All right, I will."
"Thanks"


**************
By e-mail, the number of 'back-and-forth' replies would probably be reduced, but the cycles (question-answer-acknowledge or statement-acknowledge) will still be there somehow. Some sentences might act as 'answer' and 'acknowledgement' at the same time.

"Did you replace the lamp?
"No. Do you want it replaced even if it's still working?"
"Yes - probably a good idea. It's six months since the last service.
"OK, Will do."


Nothing wrong with telling someone what you want doing - and expecting them to do it.
It's the fact of actually ORDERING them to do it which is a bit frowned upon in this society.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
coag
Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2019 1:08:39 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2010
Posts: 1,198
Neurons: 6,438
Thanks, palapaguy, and Drag0nspeaker, for your comments.
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