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Does 'collateral' have any sense as lieutenant' Options
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 12:51:19 PM

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Hi Everyone!


I have seen a movie titled with 'COLLATERAL'. So, I got asking myself what the meaning is

Does 'collateral' have any sense as 'lieutenant'?


I looked up 'collateral' in TFD, and I've found out:
adj.
1. Situated or running side by side; parallel.
2. Coinciding in tendency or effect; concomitant or accompanying.
3. Serving to support or corroborate: collateral evidence.
4. Of a secondary nature; subordinate: collateral target damage from a bombing run.
5. Of, relating to, or guaranteed by a security pledged against the performance of an obligation: a collateral loan, a financial collateral
6. Having an ancestor in common but descended from a different line.
n.
1. Property acceptable as security for a loan or other obligation.
2. A collateral relative.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Tuesday, November 13, 2018 3:50:27 PM

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A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!


I have seen a movie titled with 'COLLATERAL'. So, I got asking myself what the meaning is

Does 'collateral' have any sense as 'lieutenant'?


I looked up 'collateral' in TFD, and I've found out:
adj.
1. Situated or running side by side; parallel.
2. Coinciding in tendency or effect; concomitant or accompanying.
3. Serving to support or corroborate: collateral evidence.
4. Of a secondary nature; subordinate: collateral target damage from a bombing run.
5. Of, relating to, or guaranteed by a security pledged against the performance of an obligation: a collateral loan, a financial collateral
6. Having an ancestor in common but descended from a different line.
n.
1. Property acceptable as security for a loan or other obligation.
2. A collateral relative.


No it does not have any relation to lieutenant.

In the case of the film about a taxi driver who unwittingly picks up a passenger that is a hitman and is then forced to help him it can several different things depending on what a particular viewer decides.
It could mean things that happen as a coincidence, something that is secondary in nature particularly the damage caused by the killer as he goes about his tasks or even the obligation of a taxi driver to do as his passenger asks.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
crosswired
Posted: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 1:31:22 AM

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I've watched the movie several times, so I guess my question is where are you getting lieutenant?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, November 14, 2018 2:31:15 AM

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Hi!

I agree with Sarrriesfan.

Though "collateral" is used with some nouns to mean "subordinate" or "secondary", it is not used as a noun to mean "subordinate" or "lieutenant".

It's generally used in a few specific phrases, and you will not often see it otherwise.

Definition '1' is rarely used in normal life - Collateral lines - but is a good word when speaking of geography, topology and so on. The two sides of some buildings may be said to be collateral, but not parallel.
There is a line of hills with a collateral river.


Collateral damage - something damaged 'by the side of' the thing someone is trying to destroy.
(A soldier trying to shoot an enemy soldier also shoots a civilian - to the military mind, the civilian is 'collateral damage') This is a combination of your definitions '2' and '4'.

Definition '3' - Collateral evidence - a fact or datum which does not prove something, but supports the idea.
The fact that "the suspect travelled a thousand miles and spent the day of the robbery in the town where the robbery took place" does not prove he's the robber - but it is an indicator of something. It is evidence 'at the side of' the main evidence. You may hear 'collateral data' or 'collateral facts', but 'collateral evidence' is the most common phrase.

Definition '5' is very specifically related to finance and banking etc.It's not an area I know much about - even from reading fiction. It's related directly to the noun definition'1'.

Definition '6' is another specialised meaning. You may hear it in discussions of inheritance or "Who will become the next king?" type of question.

***********
In the film, the story of the taxi-driver is "at the side of" the story of Travolta's hit-man character. The main action is the hit-man - but the film is of the collateral story of the taxi-driver.
Also there is a LOT of collateral damage. I don't remember the story in detail, but I remember that the hit-man is rather indiscriminate about who gets hurt or killed.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, November 17, 2018 10:41:57 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!
Collateral damage - something damaged 'by the side of' the thing someone is trying to destroy.
(A soldier trying to shoot an enemy soldier also shoots a civilian - to the military mind, the civilian is 'collateral damage') This is a combination of your definitions '2' and '4'.


Thank you all of you,

Drag0nspeaker, Sarrriesfan, crosswired

According to the sense #2 and#4, you think perhaps I'll see "The Collateral Damages" typed in the instructions side on a sticker of a bottle of medicine.
I always see "the Side Effects"

Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!
***********
In the film, the story of the taxi-driver is "at the side of" the story of Travolta's hit-man character. The main action is the hit-man - but the film is of the collateral story of the taxi-driver.
Also there is a LOT of collateral damage. I don't remember the story in detail, but I remember that the hit-man is rather indiscriminate about who gets hurt or killed.


Due to the collateral damages done during the movie, then the movie was titled with "COLLATERAl".

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 18, 2018 2:26:21 PM

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A cooperator wrote:
According to the sense #2 and#4, you think perhaps I'll see "The Collateral Damages" typed in the instructions side on a sticker of a bottle of medicine.
I always see "the Side Effects".

You will always see "side effects".
That is the phrase which means "harmful effects of drugs" or "harmful effects caused by a supposedly helpful thing".
"Collateral damage" is used for damage done by something which is supposed to damage something.

A drug is supposed to help, but most drugs cause harm - Side effects.
A soldier is supposed to kill one person, but kills three - Collateral damage.

A cooperator wrote:
Due to the collateral damages done during the movie, then the movie was titled with "COLLATERAL".

There is a single-word verb used for your "titled with" - entitled.

Due to the collateral damage done during the movie, then the movie was entitled "COLLATERAL".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 11:52:30 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

There is a single-word verb used for your "titled with" - entitled.

Due to the collateral damage done during the movie, then the movie was entitled "COLLATERAL".



Thanks a lot,

I have seen that you omitted the "s" in the word "damage".
So, why can we not modify a plural noun with "collateral" in "collateral damages" however, we can in "Collateral lines"?

Also, why do you think movie was not entitled "collateral damage"?


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, November 20, 2018 6:38:16 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
According to the sense #2 and#4, you think perhaps I'll see "The Collateral Damages" typed in the instructions side on a sticker of a bottle of medicine.
I always see "the Side Effects".

You will always see "side effects".
That is the phrase which means "harmful effects of drugs" or "harmful effects caused by a supposedly helpful thing".
"Collateral damage" is used for damage done by something which is supposed to damage something.

A drug is supposed to help, but most drugs cause harm - Side effects.
A soldier is supposed to kill one person, but kills three - Collateral damage.

A cooperator wrote:
Due to the collateral damages done during the movie, then the movie was titled with "COLLATERAL".

There is a single-word verb used for your "titled with" - entitled.

Due to the collateral damage done during the movie, then the movie was entitled "COLLATERAL".


I think the single-word verb here should be titled, at least in AE.

https://www.google.com/search?q=titled&oq=titled&aqs=chrome..69i57j0l5.3942j0j4&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, November 21, 2018 4:56:22 PM

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A cooperator wrote:
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

There is a single-word verb used for your "titled with" - entitled.

Due to the collateral damage done during the movie, then the movie was entitled "COLLATERAL".



Thanks a lot,

I have seen that you omitted the "s" in the word "damage".
So, why can we not modify a plural noun with "collateral" in "collateral damages" however, we can in "Collateral lines"?

Also, why do you think movie was not entitled "collateral damage"?


Because there was already a film called "Collateral Damage" that stars Arnold Schwarzenegger.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, November 22, 2018 4:41:36 AM

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Hi again.

"Damage" is an uncountable noun. Similar to "harm".
"Collateral damage" is 'more damage', not 'another damage'.

"Damages" is a different noun - meaning "the money required to be paid as compensation for an injury or wrong".
(If you - for example - crash your car into someone's house, you would have two penalties.
You may have a fine or even prison sentence for the dangerous driving and you will be required to pay damages (the cost of repairing the house, and the cost of the person living in a hotel while the house is repaired, etc).

Hello palapaguy.
That's strange - because the link you give leads me to a search which gives definitions of 'titled' - all meaning "having a rank in nobility". Not "being called something".

I believe you that you would used 'titled', but it sounds odd to me "over here".

Here are the top few lines of the Google page your link takes me to.

Quote:

titled

/ˈtʌɪt(ə)ld/
adjective
(of a person) having a title indicating high social or official rank.
"many titled guests were always invited"

TITLED | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/titled
titled adjective (PERSON) ​ A person who is titled has a special word, such as Sir or Lady, before their own name, showing that they have a high social rank: one of his titled friends. Royalty, aristocracy & titles.

Titled | Definition of Titled by Merriam-Webster
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/titled
Definition of titled. : having a title especially of nobility.


This is what Merriam Webster dictionary gives for "entitle" - though it does have another meaning - something like 'deserving'. (I'm entitled to twenty-eight days holiday a year, according to my contract.)
Entitle | Definition of Entitle by Merriam-Webster
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/entitle
Entitle definition is - to give a title to : designate. ... In 1907, businessman and author Thomas Lawson published a novel entitled Friday, the Thirteenth about a ...


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, November 25, 2018 4:36:14 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:


Hello palapaguy.
That's strange - because the link you give leads me to a search which gives definitions of 'titled' - all meaning "having a rank in nobility". Not "being called something".

I believe you that you would used 'titled', but it sounds odd to me "over here".

Here are the top few lines of the Google page your link takes me to.

Quote:

titled

/ˈtʌɪt(ə)ld/
adjective
(of a person) having a title indicating high social or official rank.
"many titled guests were always invited"

TITLED | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/titled
titled adjective (PERSON) ​ A person who is titled has a special word, such as Sir or Lady, before their own name, showing that they have a high social rank: one of his titled friends. Royalty, aristocracy & titles.

Titled | Definition of Titled by Merriam-Webster
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/titled
Definition of titled. : having a title especially of nobility.


This is what Merriam Webster dictionary gives for "entitle" - though it does have another meaning - something like 'deserving'. (I'm entitled to twenty-eight days holiday a year, according to my contract.)
Entitle | Definition of Entitle by Merriam-Webster
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/entitle
Entitle definition is - to give a title to : designate. ... In 1907, businessman and author Thomas Lawson published a novel entitled Friday, the Thirteenth about a ...



Thank you all of you very much indeed,

Having said 'There is a single-word verb used for your "titled with" - entitled.', you meant 'titled with' which was replaced with 'entitled' since here 'title with' or 'entitled' describes a state(an adjective). Or whatever 'title' or 'entitle' is used, no need to have 'with' paired with either.


While writing 'title with' or even 'entitle with' as a two-word verb(phrasal verb), I was thinking about that 'title' or even 'entitled' is a passivised verb.


The movie was title / entitled with "collateral" - Here 'title' or 'entitled' is an adjective (describing a state).
The movie was titled / entitled with "collateral damage". - Here 'title' or 'entitled' is a passivised (an action).

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, December 2, 2018 3:26:29 PM

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Could anyone please address these final points of mine?

Having said 'There is a single-word verb used for your "titled with" - entitled.', you meant 'titled with' which was replaced with 'entitled' since here 'title with' or 'entitled' describes a state(an adjective). Or whatever 'title' or 'entitle' is used, no need to have 'with' paired with either.


While writing 'title with' or even 'entitle with' as a two-word verb(phrasal verb), I was thinking about that 'title' or even 'entitled' is a passivised verb.

The movie was title / entitled with "collateral" - Here 'title' or 'entitled' is an adjective (describing a state).
The movie was titled / entitled with "collateral damage". - Here 'title' or 'entitled' is a passivised (an action).



P.S. Why are some movies, esp, those dealing with gun battles between gangs vs a hero, shown on the MBC 2 channel on the Arabsat satellite, such as 'Safe' movie, etc.
The sound of movie is so loud that a viewer could hardly understand a spoken language in a movie.
I am really even wondering how those interpreters could translated a movie along with a voice ranting, from English to Arabic subtitles.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 2:15:09 AM

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There was no question to answer - you are right.
It's the same with almost any transitive verb - a passive sentence can use exactly the same words as a sentence expressing a state. However, of course, there are probably exceptions.

The book was entitled "Collateral".
- a passive. Someone named the book "Collateral" (probably the author or publisher).
The book was entitled "Collateral". - the title of the book was "Collateral".
The window was broken. - a passive. Someone or something broke the window.
The window was broken. - a state. The condition of the window was imperfect.
The TV was switched on. - Someone switched the TV on.
The TV was switched on. - The condition of the TV was that it was using power and showing pictures.

The actual result is the same - you have a book in your hand and it says "Collateral" on the cover - therefore, someone must have decided that its name was "Collateral".
Or there's glass on the floor and the wind is blowing into the room, therefore, someone or something broke the window.

**************
I don't know why some films are made in such a way that one can't hear the dialogue.
I like action movies, but I do like to hear what's being said, too.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
A cooperator
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 9:25:12 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:


Definition '3' - Collateral evidence - a fact or datum which does not prove something, but supports the idea.
The fact that "the suspect travelled a thousand miles and spent the day of the robbery in the town where the robbery took place" does not prove he's the robber - but it is an indicator of something. It is evidence 'at the side of' the main evidence. You may hear 'collateral data' or 'collateral facts', but 'collateral evidence' is the most common phrase.


You think "collateral life" means "incremental life".

Everyone can be wrong. Life is a right, not collateral or casual.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 12:45:38 PM

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I've never heard of 'collateral life' or 'incremental life' - and I don't know what either of them would mean, really.

However, I can see no reason that 'collateral' could be considered to mean 'incremental'.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 6:36:24 PM
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" collateral: mass noun. Something pledged as security for repayment of a loan, to be forfeited in the event of a default.
‘she put her house up as collateral for the bank loan’

2A person having the same ancestor as another but through a different line.


ADJECTIVE
1. Additional but subordinate; secondary.
‘the collateral meanings of a word’

1.1 Eeuphemistic; Denoting inadvertent casualties and destruction in civilian areas in the course of military operations.
‘munitions must be able to destroy the target without causing collateral damage’
‘collateral casualties’

2 Descended from the same stock but by a different line.
‘a collateral descendant of Robert Burns’

3 Situated side by side; parallel.
‘collateral veins’

Origin
Late Middle English (as an adjective): from medieval Latin collateralis, from col- ‘together with’ + lateralis (from latus, later- ‘side’). collateral (sense 1 of the noun) (originally US) is from the phrase collateral security, denoting something pledged in addition to the main obligation of a contract.

Pronunciation
collateral/kəˈlat(ə)r(ə)l/ "

(https://bit.ly/2EQ5jz9)

Does anything here in the accepted (by all English speakers) definition of "collateral", support your ideas? If not, do you agree that your ideas are not, so far, supported by any evidence?

Thus, would it not appear that if the Oxford makes no mention of lieuetenants, or increments or incremental life (which, like Drago, I can't begin to understand the meaning of); that none of these things is associated with the meaning of "collateral"?

Or, do your think perhaps, that you may not have completely understood what the word means to English-speakers?

A cooperator
Posted: Monday, January 7, 2019 4:26:43 AM

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Romany wrote:

Or, do your think perhaps, that you may not have completely understood what the word means to English-speakers.

Not all, look at the transcript of this talk show:
I will not dance to your war drum. I will not lend my soul nor my bones to your war drum. I will not dance to that beating. I know that beat. It is lifeless. I know intimately that skin you are hitting. It was alive once, hunted, stolen, stretched. I will not dance to your drummed-up war. I will not pop, spin, break for you. I will not hate for you or even hate you. I will not kill for you. Especially I will not die for you. I will not mourn the dead with murder nor suicide. I will not side with you or dance to bombs because everyone is dancing. Everyone can be wrong. Life is a right, not collateral or casual. I will not forget where I come from. I will craft my own drum. Gather my beloved near, and our chanting will be dancing. Our humming will be drumming. I will not be played. I will not lend my name nor my rhythm to your beat. I will dance and resist and dance and persist and dance. This heartbeat is louder than death. Your war drum ain't louder than this breath. Haaa.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Monday, January 7, 2019 4:32:29 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
I've never heard of 'collateral life' or 'incremental life' - and I don't know what either of them would mean, really.

However, I can see no reason that 'collateral' could be considered to mean 'incremental'.

Drag0nspeaker
Look at the transcript of the talk show.

I don't know which definition of those six ones is used here.
Life is a right, not collateral or casual.

I think it is the fifth
5. Of, relating to, or guaranteed by a security pledged against the performance of an obligation: a collateral loan, a financial collateral.

But nevertheless, I don't think I can say "It is not collateral life" or "It is collateral life", but I can say "
"Life is not collateral." or "Life is collateral."

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 5:34:58 AM

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Does that make sense? Does it add meaning?
I can't see that adding any meaning.

...not collateral or casual.


So this is something like casual.

I can't see anything to do with a pledge. The nearest thing to 'casual' is something that happens accidentally as a side-effect of something else.
Life is the important thing. It is not casual. It is not an accidental by-product.

This is an odd way of saying it, but remember this is a talk show, conversation. Sometimes people just say something that does not make much sense! Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 2:24:31 PM

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In my opinion, in that sentence, it's definition four of the six which you originally posted. This is similar to thar's opinion.

Life is a right, not secondary or casual.

It's an anti-war poem - Suheir Hammad denouncing killing, denouncing suicide bombs. Refusing to kill for either side, or for any philosophy.

Quote:
Language can't math me.
I experience exponentially.
Everything is everything.
One woman loses 15, maybe 20, members of her family.
One woman loses six.
One woman loses her head.
One woman searches rubble.
One woman feeds on trash.
One woman shoots her face.
One woman shoots her husband.
One woman straps herself.
One woman gives birth to a baby.
One woman gives birth to borders.
One woman no longer believes love will ever find her.
One woman never did.
Where do refugee hearts go?
Broken, dissed, placed where they're not from, don't want to be missed.
Faced with absence.
We mourn each one or we mean nothing at all.


Poetry is very rarely "perfectly grammatical" - sometimes, it's very ungrammatical.
Often, poems are deliberately not clear and simple - the poet wants to make people think.

I would like to see the full show - this is only a five-minute excerpt.

I understand why you call it a "talk-show" - she's talking and there's the word "talk" in the title.
However TED Talks are not quite what is understood as a 'talk-show'.
A 'talk-show' is a chat, an informal conversation between a host and one or several guests.
TED talks are more formal and prepared.

************
EDITED to add:
I realised that I had not answered your last comments.

You're right - saying "It is collateral life", "It is not collateral life" or "secondary life" does not really convey the idea.
"Life is not collateral" or "Life is not secondary or casual" does give the message very well.




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
RuthP
Posted: Wednesday, January 9, 2019 4:27:55 PM

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A cooperator wrote:
Romany wrote:

Or, do your think perhaps, that you may not have completely understood what the word means to English-speakers.

Not all, look at the transcript of this talk show:
I will not dance to your war drum. I will not lend my soul nor my bones to your war drum. I will not dance to that beating. I know that beat. It is lifeless. I know intimately that skin you are hitting. It was alive once, hunted, stolen, stretched. I will not dance to your drummed-up war. I will not pop, spin, break for you. I will not hate for you or even hate you. I will not kill for you. Especially I will not die for you. I will not mourn the dead with murder nor suicide. I will not side with you or dance to bombs because everyone is dancing. Everyone can be wrong. Life is a right, not collateral or casual. I will not forget where I come from. I will craft my own drum. Gather my beloved near, and our chanting will be dancing. Our humming will be drumming. I will not be played. I will not lend my name nor my rhythm to your beat. I will dance and resist and dance and persist and dance. This heartbeat is louder than death. Your war drum ain't louder than this breath. Haaa.

This is a TED talk by Suheir Hammad. She is a poet and, though not speaking in verse, is speaking poetically here. (She came to the US at age 5, so it is likely she can speak English as a native. As her parents are Palestinian, it is likely the family spoke Arabic at home and this may color her word choices/usages. The use of "collateral" in that particular sentence is non-standard.

Looking at the entire quotation, I believe she is using "collateral" as a reference to the term "collateral damage" (another way of saying "people we killed (oops) while we were trying to destroy something or kill somebody else").

She is protesting the idea that death of a person / a person's loss of life can be a "collateral damage" on the way to something else/some other goal. She is saying the death of a person deprives that person of their life, the life which is their right.

You cannot use the structure of her sentence as a guide to the usage of "collateral" and "life" in any general conversational sense. It is not written as a standard usage. It is not used in a conversational or standard written manner.
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, January 12, 2019 1:59:02 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:

I would like to see the full show - this is only a five-minute excerpt.

I understand why you call it a "talk-show" - she's talking and there's the word "talk" in the title.
However TED Talks are not quite what is understood as a 'talk-show'.
A 'talk-show' is a chat, an informal conversation between a host and one or several guests.
TED talks are more formal and prepared.

************


Thank you all of you very much indeed,
I embedded the link of the full talk show if you would like to watch it.
But, the TED calls all those as talk shows.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Saturday, January 12, 2019 2:13:50 PM

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Yes, but the thing is I think they are making a pointed joke, making fun of the words 'talk show'. A TED talk is an event, which is filmed, and uploaded, where inspirational people give a talk to an audience.
They are making fun of the usual meaning of a 'talk show' which is a 'chat show' on TV where a host has celebrities sit on a sofa and chat, have a laugh, maybe say something interesting but usually just be mildly entertaining (and promote their latest film/TV series/tour, or just their personal profile) .
That is the joke, as I see it - the difference between the usual meaning of the phrase, and the way the TED talks use it.



Romany
Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 5:44:10 AM
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I went Googling for "Ted talks" being referred to as a "talk show" in their own output and could find no mention of them referring to themselves as a "talk show". They refer to their product solely as "Ted talks" in every mention I could find.
thar
Posted: Sunday, January 13, 2019 6:15:40 AM

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Ah, OK. That makes a difference.

Coop, maybe you have taken the one word 'talk' and thought that made it a talk show?

A TED event is a talk. But the production is not a show. A talk show is something else.

A talk is a presentation by an expert of some kind. Eg members of a local astronomy group might go to their regular meeting and someone will give a talk on new discoveries about Pluto.

Quote:
talk verb [ I ] (LECTURE)
B2 to give a lecture on a subject:
The next speaker will be talking about endangered insects.

talk noun
B2 [ C ] a speech given to a group of people to teach or tell them about a particular subject:
He gave a talk about/on his visit to Malaysia.



but a show is something special to watch (or listen to, in the case of radio shows) - a Broadway show, the half-time show at a sports event, a talk show (where celebrities talk/chat).

Quote:
show
British English
noun
(ENTERTAINMENT)

A2 [ C ] a theatre performance or a television or radio programme that is entertaining rather than serious:

a radio/television/stage show
a quiz/game show
Why don't we go to London on Saturday and see a show?
We had to raise £60,000 to stage the show.
We had a puppet show for Jamie's birthday party.

American English
show
noun (ENTERTAINMENT)
​[ C ] a performance in a theater, a movie, or a television or radio program:
a stage/talk show


TED talks are serious (even though most speakers will use humour as a way of making their talks interesting and enjoyable) - they are not casual entertainment like a chat show.

There is a difference in what British and American people would call a 'show'. In British English, the TED talks are not shows, because they are not light entertainment. In American English the word covers a broader range, so I don't know if people there would call them shows. But they are not 'talk shows' because that means something specific and different.
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, January 17, 2019 3:05:54 PM

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thar wrote:
Ah, OK. That makes a difference.
Coop, maybe you have taken the one word 'talk' and thought that made it a talk show?


Thank you both of you,
Yes, I was thinking of it like that.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
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