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''get the job done'' Options
ullas84
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 4:06:47 AM
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A)I got my hair cut

B)I got my car cleaned

Sentences above are causitive sentences.

They mean ;

I paid someone to cut my hair

I paid someone to clean my car.

But;!!!!!

''C)They are doing overtime to get the job done'' is in the same structure with the sentences above (get+something+past participle) but it is not a causitive sentence.

it means ''They are doing overtime to finish the job''(They are doing themselves not paying someone else to do)

İs ''to+get+something+done'' a fixed phrase and is it an exception for the verb ''do''?

get something done
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 6:25:16 AM

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I am not a grammarian. Someone else may explain it in a more formal and technical way. IMO, these structures are same. There is no need to include the payment part. It has no relation.

"to get something done" is a common structure.

A got something done (by B).

Now it is to A and B whether they want to include money in this or not. Do not get confused.

A is getting the work done by the agent B. Here, B can be the same person as A.

I got my hair cut (by a barber).
I got my hair cut (by my son).
I got my hair cut (myself).

They are doing overtime to get the job done.
The labourers are doing overtime to get their job done.
The supervisors are doing overtime to get the job done (by the labourers).
The engineers are doing overtime to get the job done (by the supervisors).


We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
ullas84
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 8:30:08 AM
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srirr wrote:

I got my hair cut (myself).



First of all thanks for your detailed answer.

is there any difference in meaning even in nuance between the following sentences?

A)I got my hair cut (myself)

B) I cut my hair
Marek Guman
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 10:39:52 AM

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Location: Košice, Kosicky, Slovakia
ullas84 wrote:
srirr wrote:

I got my hair cut (myself).



First of all thanks for your detailed answer.

is there any difference in meaning even in nuance between the following sentences?

A)I got my hair cut (myself)

B) I cut my hair


A) I got my hair cut means someone else has cut my hair. When you want to say you cut your hair you say exactly B) I cut my hair.

Get the job done is different phrase I think, it is used in infinitive mode.
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 10:49:40 AM

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There are two different structures here.


One is to arrange for someone else to do the job.
It is like 'to have something done'.


The other is to finally achieve a goal by overcoming obstacles.

So things done by other people
- I had my hair cut.
I got my hair cut.
I disagree that could include by yourself - that would've 'I cut my hair's.
That could also mean you had someone do it. If you needed to make it clear, you would add ' myself'.

I painted my house - myself or someone else.
I had my house painted - paid someone to do it.
( Maybe some use this -I got my house painted - arranged for someone to do it)
I finally got my house painted - you have been postponing it for years and now feel proud you have completed it.


Along with the explanation of working overtime, this clearly means to achieve completion despite obstacles - the lack of time.


Quote:
get something done
Synonyms for get something done

verb solve; satisfy
accomplish
achieve


It indicates difficulty
I started the engine - plain action
I got the engine started - implies I had to try several times,or I had to fix a problem
Marek Guman
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 11:27:04 AM

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thar wrote:

It indicates difficulty
I started the engine - plain action
I got the engine started - implies I had to try several times,or I had to fix a problem


This is a good point.
FROSTY X RIME
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 12:42:16 PM

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Marek Guman wrote:
thar wrote:

It indicates difficulty
I started the engine - plain action
I got the engine started - implies I had to try several times,or I had to fix a problem


This is a good point.


I like that as well.
thar's point deserves applause and recognition.

What should be shall be-The fellowship of the ring-
ullas84
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 1:14:05 PM
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you said above that ;

It indicates difficulty
I started the engine - plain action
I got the engine started - implies I had to try several times,or I had to fix a problem


What about have +something+v3

Eg;

I had the engine started ,

Does it indicate the same difficulty like ''get+something+done''?
thar
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 1:52:21 PM

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Thanks guys!


No. 'had' is just about arranging for someone else to do it. Nothing to do with difficulty by itself.


You would never say that, because of the particular example.


You can have something done' for you, but that would be a complete task - I had the car painted.


But starting an engine is not a normal 'job' you give to someone, so it doesn't work.


You can justify having someone do something, but for that particular example you would give a reason because otherwise it would be odd.
Eg
I had the salesman start the car so I could hear how well she ran.

Tara2
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 3:08:44 PM

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Hi thar
Can you please explain when "get" mean "difficulty"?
Marek Guman
Posted: Tuesday, January 8, 2019 3:23:00 PM

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Joined: 7/14/2014
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Location: Košice, Kosicky, Slovakia
Tara2 wrote:
Hi thar
Can you please explain when "get" mean "difficulty"?


Hello, what he means is that the phrase "I got the engine started" implies
that it was difficult to start the engine, because I had to turn the ignition key several times (for example).
Like "I got the engine started finally".
ullas84
Posted: Saturday, January 12, 2019 3:20:10 AM
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Thanks for the detailed answers
RuthP
Posted: Saturday, January 12, 2019 6:26:10 PM

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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
ullas84 wrote:
A)I got my hair cut

B)I got my car cleaned

Sentences above are causitive sentences.

They mean ;

I paid someone to cut my hair

I paid someone to clean my car.

But;!!!!!

''C)They are doing overtime to get the job done'' is in the same structure with the sentences above (get+something+past participle) but it is not a causitive sentence.

it means ''They are doing overtime to finish the job''(They are doing themselves not paying someone else to do)

İs ''to+get+something+done'' a fixed phrase and is it an exception for the verb ''do''?

get something done

While the other answers have good thoughts, I must point out that there is nothing in the format "I got something done" that means I paid someone to do it, or even that someone else did the "something". It certainly may mean that, but it can be used in other ways, too.

It is a causative sentence. This simply means that the subject of the sentence caused (hence causative) some action or event to occur. It does not, in and of itself, say how that action or event occurred.

I got my car washed before I picked up my boss at the airport.
Perhaps the means I paid someone to wash my car. It could also mean I had the time to wash the car before my airport trip, and I did it myself.

I got the report done.
This is unlikely to mean I had someone else write the report. It is most likely to mean I did it.

I got the report out of the Accounting Department before the deadline.
In this case, someone else (someone presumably in the Accounting department) wrote the report. I caused the report to be completed on time. This doesn't say how I did that. It's very unlikely I paid them: they work in Accounting; the company pays them. Perhaps I threatened them with dire consequences if the report were late. Perhaps I brought them doughnuts every morning for a week so they'd work harder for me. All this causative sentence really says is "I caused the report to be completed on time."

To go back to your first two sentences, one needs more context than in the words written to know exactly what happened. While it is likely "I got my watch fixed" means "I had someone repair my watch" "I caused someone to repair my watch", it is by no means sure. With just a few more words in the sentence, I can make it clear that is not what happened: "I got my watch repaired! You can find out how to do anything on You Tube, and get any tools you need from Amazon!" One would understand from this that I learned how to repair a watch by viewing You Tube videos; I bought tools to do the work from Amazon; I repaired the watch myself.

Thus your third example, about the overtime (and one generally "works" overtime, not "does" overtime) is just a causative sentence that includes the explanation of how the result was achieved.

A bare causative sentence, like your first two, simply defines who the agent is (the subject) and what was done (the predicate). Without further context, it says nothing about how the task was done or who did it.
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