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Atatürk
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 3:45:43 PM

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Their food options are smaller than this restaurant.

Fine?

Advice and classroom hints are one thing, grammar rules are another. Michael Lewis (1986)
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 4:31:46 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

It might well be fine, except that I have absolutely no idea what it means. I've tried it every whichway, but still don't understand it.
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 4:51:20 PM

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Are you trying to tell us that the restaurant has fewer selections on the menu? Are you trying to tell us that the portion sizes are smaller? And smaller than what -- another restaurant? Smaller than what you are accustomed to? Smaller than what you were expecting?
Atatürk
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 4:53:08 PM

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Talking about two restaurants, I say the first restaurant's food options are less varied than this one's.



Advice and classroom hints are one thing, grammar rules are another. Michael Lewis (1986)
srirr
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 11:23:48 PM

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Location: Delhi, NCT, India
You are counting the number of items (options) on the menu. It can be "lesser" or "more".

Then, comparison can be done between two (or more things) of similar attributes and properties. Options at one place can be compared with options at the other place, and not with the other place itself. Please note the difference.

Their food options are lesser than the options at this restaurant.
Their food options are lesser than those at this restaurant.
Their food options are lesser than those here.


One can also say,
Food options there are lesser than those here.

I assume the other restaurant is already mentioned earlier, hence a pronoun is sufficient. And, we are sitting in (or standing near) this restaurant. So. no need to say 'this restaurant'. A pronoun like 'here' will suffice.

We are responsible for what we are, and whatever we wish ourselves to be, we have the power to make ourselves. ~ Swami Vivekanand
Dynamina
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 5:20:35 AM
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Quote:

Their food options are lesser than the options at this restaurant.
Their food options are lesser than those at this restaurant.
Their food options are lesser than those here.


One can also say,
Food options there are lesser than those here.

These sentences are understandable.
But '..food options...lesser than...'!
If I said this while dining with friends, they would probably be wondering which planet I was from and guessing that I was ESL.
Atatürk
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 5:58:06 AM

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How about this?

Their food options are fewer than here.


Advice and classroom hints are one thing, grammar rules are another. Michael Lewis (1986)
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 9:13:46 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

No, We would never say "food options" in the West.

Quite simply, we would say "...but their menu is smaller/more limited/doesn't have much variety." It might indeed be something people would say in Indian English - but to BE, AE, Commonwealth, and Pacific English speakers the phrase "food options" would be very "foreign."

As you can see Wilmar (US), Dynamina (Aust.) and I (BE) had great trouble trying to interpret the sentence's meaning.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 4:40:35 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes - "This restaurant has fewer options than that one", "This restaurant has fewer choices than that one" or "This one has less choice than that one."

"Choice" can be used countably (the number of different items) or uncountably (the situation of having things to choose) - so both the statements above would work.

I think that one main objection to "food options" is that 'food' is redundant. A restaurant specialises in food, so there's no need to mention it.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 1:45:25 PM
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

But, while the word "food" does add to it, what both Dynamina's post and mine indicated is that it's really important to clarify that this is not the way English-speakers speak.

It's a perfectly good sentence to write in a travel article, or local Guidebook. But it is simply not a "typical" spoken sentence.

In a real-life setting, would you ever hear yourself saying this to your friends, workmates, family in London, New York, Australia?

Dynamina
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2019 2:39:28 PM
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Romany wrote:

... Dynamina (Aust.)...

Yikes! I've been nationalized as an Aussie!! LOL
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