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, earlier than had been planned by British prime minister Harold Wilson (the -ing construction) Options
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 10:57:33 PM

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Coop, there are lots of experienced, native English-speaking tutors available online here:

https://preply.com/en/skype/tutors-conversational-english
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:40:39 AM

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Audiendus wrote:
I am sorry, but I have nothing further to add in this thread. I cannot spend any more time on it.


Audiendus
I know you, along with Drag0nzpeaker, have been helping me. And I'd appreciate it a lot. However, I hope you or Drag0nzpeaker, confirm these points below since they are important and still have not been confirmed.

Drag0nzpeaker wrote:
I found her drinking my whisky cannot be a reduced clause. "I found her who was drinking my whisky" is not a meaningful sentence. "Drinking my whiskey" must be a participle phrase.

I found him sitting at a table covered with papers cannot be a reduced clause. "I found him who was sitting at a table covered with papers".

Firstly based on the above, how can I distinguish if a participle is used as an object complement or as an adjective (or as part of a longer participle-phrase which acts as an adjective)?



Secondly Drag0nzpeaker said the present participle is used in three main ways:
1. as an adjective (or as part of a longer participle-phrase which acts as an adjective).
So, you think all these are examples for it:

1- I found her drinking my whisky.("Drinking my whiskey" is a participle phrase cting as an adjective modifying "her". )
2- I found him sitting at a table covered with papers. ("sitting at a table covered with books" is participle-phrase acting as an adjective modifying "him".
3- {We} | {can offer} {you} {a job} {cleaning cars} . ('cleaning cars' is an adjectival phrase modifying 'a job', 'cleaning' is in the gerund form of the verb "clean")
4- {I} | {am faced with} {a problem} {understanding these huge kinds of "- ing" construction} . ("understanding these huge kinds of "- ing" construction' is an adjectival phrase modifying 'a trouble', 'understanding' is in the the gerund form of the verb "understand")
5- I | {am having} {a hard time}{making up my mind}. ("making up my mind" is an adjectival phrase modifying 'a hard time', "making up" is in the gerund form of the verb "make".)

If I was right, I'd think these below cannot be also analyzed as reduced relative clauses. So, do you think the highlighted can be adjectival phrases(participle phrases), and the marked with blue color are the gerund forms.
a. I cut myself shaving this morning .
b. Do you think you can get the radio working this morning?
c. We could spend a lot of time  gazing at this view, but the second-most populous US city. 
d. In the studies, the babies spent more time  looking  the attractive faces than the unattractive ones.
e. As has been said - you are trying to jump straight to the results without doing the basic work  reading  texts in the language you are trying to learn.



Thirdly: if the five ones (a, b, c, d, e) highlighted above were adverbial participle phrases, then how could I distinguish an adverbial phrase from an adjectival phrase?

Fourthrly: you said below 'after falling ill' is a prepositional gerund phrase(adjectival phrase)(That is, 'falling' acts as a noun), and NOT a prepositional participle phrase. How could you distinguish that? I.e. why you didn't say 'participle phrase'
Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Verbs followed by adjectives, and then used with the meaning as ordinary link verbs:
Sometimes some verbs (sit, stand, lie, fall) can be followed by adjectives. This happen when are really describing the subject of the sentence, and not the action of the verb.

'fall ill, sick, victim, prey to' to get a very serious illness or to be attacked or deceived by someone.
The conservative US writer and commentator Bre Payton has died at the age of 26 after falling ill. (=..... After she was falling ill. )

Yes that is correct - except that "falling" here is a gerund, not an abbreviation of the continuous tense "she was falling". (A continuous tense is not appropriate here.)



Finaly: I think Drag0nzpeaker
forgot participles can be used after prepositions and conjunctions. E.g,
The conservative US writer and commentator Bre Payton has died at the age of 26 after falling ill. (=..... After she was falling ill. )

Or the above participle underlined comes in "as part of a verb-form (along with an auxiliary verb, often some form of 'be')" as Drag0nzpeaker? said.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 2:08:12 PM
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Coop please, please look at the last link I gave you.

I don't think there's anyone left here who can help you.

For all the reasons you yourself have listed - there are no easily accessible language schools near you right now; you never hear people talking English; you don't know how words are pronounced; you can't tell the difference between formal and informal language....you absolutely need all these things. And they are all a touch of the button away. You can as easily click on to all of that as you can click on to this site!Dancing

At the same time you'll be actually learning to speak in English.Applause Not just learning the explanations about how it's written.

A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 3:50:25 PM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 3,145
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Yes, you're right.
But, I am in need to know the analysis of '-ing' forms here:
If I was right, I'd think these below cannot be also analyzed as reduced relative clauses. So, do you think the highlighted can be adjectival phrases(participle phrases), and the marked with blue color are the gerund forms.
a. I cut myself shaving this morning .
b. Do you think you can get the radio working this morning?
c. We could spend a lot of time  gazing at this view, but the second-most populous US city. 
d. In the studies, the babies spent more time  looking  the attractive faces than the unattractive ones.
e. As has been said - you are trying to jump straight to the results without doing the basic work  reading  texts in the language you are trying to learn.


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 4:54:50 PM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
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Romany wrote:
Coop please, please look at the last link I gave you.

Romany, I've never ever remembered that you'd previously given me any links.Anxious That link I remember has been given by palapaguy.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Sunday, January 6, 2019 3:38:35 AM

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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Audiendus previously said that these are adverbial phrases. But, I am asking if you think they can be rephrased as I wrote in the blue colour.
Also, do you think they are all adverbial phrases like this construction called adverbial phrase - "with the British leaving Aden by the end of November 1967" = "and the British left Aden...." or "Nikki Haley, the exiting U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, issued a harsh assessment of UNESCO on Tuesday, one day after the United States and Israel officially quit the U.N. agency, alleging an anti-Israel bias." = "......, and the United States and Israel alleged an anti-Israel bias."


Audiendus wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
I cut myself shaving this morning (I think = I cut myself while/when I was shaving this morning ). - I think the key around this is the answer of this question 'How did I cut myself?'
We could spend a lot of time while/when we are gazing at this view, but the second-most populous US city. - 'How could we spend a lot of time?'
In the studies, the babies spent more time while/when they were looking at the attractive faces than the unattractive ones. - 'How did the babies spend more time?'
As has been said - you are trying to jump straight to the results without doing the basic work while/when you're reading texts in the language you are trying to learn. - 'How am I doing the basick work?'

Yes, I agree. The "ing..." phrases are therefore adverbial.





Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 6:28:24 PM

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A cooperator wrote:
This is part of Michael Swan's book.






Audiendus, I posted here trying to keep questions posted in the related thread.

Audiendus wrote:

"With Peter working in Birmingham, and lucky travelling most of the week, the house seems pretty much." I don't think it is the same construction you said is used in my sentence 'Tottenham scored with five minutes of the match remaining' Grammatically, it is the same construction. The only difference is that the clause "With Peter working in Birmingham..." gives the reason that the house seems pretty much, whereas the clause "with five minutes of the match remaining" (which could be moved to the beginning of the sentence) gives the time that Tottenham scored.

We discussed this "with + noun + participle" construction in one of your other threads. It means "in a/the situation in which..."
Tottenham scored in the situation in which five minutes of the match remained.
Does Michael Swan mention this construction? See if you can find a reference to it in his book or elsewhere.




If you have a look at the screenshots I posted for Michael Swan's book, you'll see that he only mentioned adverbial clauses for no #3
However, others he call participle clauses.
I think that the highlighted ones are adverbial clauses/phrases as well. Though Michael Swan listed the final one under participle clauses with its own subjects.
Tottenham scored with five minutes of the match remaining = Tottenham scored in the situation in which five minutes of the match remained.
With Peter working in Birmingham, and lucky travelling most of the week, the house seems pretty much.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
A cooperator
Posted: Tuesday, January 15, 2019 6:53:30 PM

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Joined: 10/27/2011
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!
Would anyone please confirm if these marked in the blue colours come in adverbial phrases? If the six ones highlighted below were adverbial participle phrases, then how could I distinguish an adverbial phrase from an adjectival phrase?

Audiendus previously said that the first four ones are adverbial phrases. But, I am asking if you think they can be rephrased as I wrote in the blue colour.
Also, do you think they are all adverbial phrases like this construction called adverbial phrase - "with the British leaving Aden by the end of November 1967" = "and the British left Aden...." or "Nikki Haley, the exiting U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, issued a harsh assessment of UNESCO on Tuesday, one day after the United States and Israel officially quit the U.N. agency, alleging an anti-Israel bias." = "......, and the United States and Israel alleged an anti-Israel bias."

Audiendus wrote:
Yes, I agree. The "ing..." phrases are therefore adverbial



1. I cut myself shaving this morning = I cut myself while/when I was shaving this morning . - I think the key around this is the answer of this question 'How did I cut myself?'
2. We could spend a lot of time gazing at this view, but the second-most populous US city. = We could spend a lot of time while/when we are gazing at this view, but the second-most populous US city - 'How could we spend a lot of time?'
3. In the studies, the babies spent more time looking at the attractive faces than the unattractive ones. = In the studies, the babies spent more time while/when they were looking at the attractive faces than the unattractive ones. - 'How did the babies spend more time?' - 'How did the babies spend more time?'
4. As has been said - you are trying to jump straight to the results without doing the basic work reading texts in the language you are trying to learn. = As has been said - you are trying to jump straight to the results without doing the basic work while/when you're reading texts in the language you are trying to learn. - 'How am I doing the basick work?' - 'How am I doing the basick work?'
5. The Palestinian was rushed to the hospital where he died affecting his wounds. = The Palestinian was rushed to the hospital where he died when he affected his wounds. - 'How did he die?'
6. Do you think you can get the radio working this morning? = Do you think you can get the radio where it is working this morning? '- How can you get the radio?'










Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
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