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"Having/needing to be liked by everybody" in a single word Options
Taxiarchis
Posted: Saturday, September 13, 2014 7:04:53 PM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 4/28/2014
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Hi,


Does anybody know of a word or term that describe the "quality" (or fault, if you so prefer to call it) of needing to be liked by just everybody. You probably know what I'm talking about: that urge some people have to be in good terms with everyone around them, that itching they get when they find out someone has a less than perfect concept of them.

Like: insecurity, dependency, needy, dithering, indecision, spinelessness, "self-alienation"(?)


Thank you in advance
Judith M
Posted: Saturday, September 13, 2014 9:51:08 PM

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Location: Detroit, Michigan, United States
socially insecure?
idk
Posted: Saturday, September 13, 2014 10:00:48 PM
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Joined: 7/29/2014
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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Not one word - but they need approval. More so than the rest of us.

Or - a people pleaser.



It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so. Anon
Jorge Ortiz
Posted: Saturday, September 13, 2014 10:25:53 PM
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia
Reputation need
Yakcal
Posted: Saturday, September 13, 2014 11:45:57 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/1/2011
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Location: Trinidad, California, United States

Hi Taxi,

The only single word that would fulfil your needs, of which I am aware, would be 'needy'.

As I've heard it used it communicates a person's need to be liked and even a 'favorite' of people within his circle of friends. And there is even the aspect of that person becoming distressed and then worse, if apparent feelings are not reciprocated.

I would not want to live like that.



Be yourself; everyone else is already taken. -Oscar Wilde
idk
Posted: Sunday, September 14, 2014 10:24:39 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
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Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Hi Yakcal,

I thought of 'needy' but you would still need to explain what the need is about. Poor people can be needy for money.
So if it is in context, then 'needy' is the word, I agree.

There are two definitions for 'needy' in the TFD.



It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so. Anon
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, September 14, 2014 10:59:35 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 10,506
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"Needy" fits, and the tone of voice and facial expression usually conveys exactly what is meant by the word.

I often think of them as "emotional vampires" - they drain you, emotionally, by their neediness.

We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Russell Sadowski
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 12:43:16 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 1/5/2019
Posts: 1
Neurons: 3
amicable would be the polite word non-confrontational would be more derisive
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, January 5, 2019 2:11:37 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 31,670
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hello Russell.
Welcome to the forum.

That's true - it has the implication that the person IS really likeable, and acts that way.

I thought of "propitiative". That's more the action of trying to make people (or gods) friendly, rather than the quality of needing to have people like one - but it's close.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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