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Interesting (and dangerous) idioms Options
Paulo Rogério 7
Posted: Tuesday, January 1, 2019 6:19:07 PM

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Two interesting idioms to discuss:
"call in a chit", as in "Are you asking me as a friend, or are you calling in a chit?" Are you asking me a favour or collecting a debt? I was wondering if someone wouldn't call in a shit by mistake.
"call in the chips", as when you sell something you own in order to get money from that. As an analogy to poker, I suppose.
Think what a way to start a new year!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, January 2, 2019 10:51:16 AM
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Indeed they are both interesting. I've never come across either so can't actually discuss them other than to say thanks for sharing. It's always good to learn from other cultures.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 1:52:24 AM

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I am a little surprised you have not heard of chit Romany.
A chit or chitty is a piece of paper used as a record of something being used or owed.
"I needed money from petty cash to buy teabags so I left a chit for what I took".

It's a loan word into English from India, like khaki and bungalow, and was common in British Military circles soldiers would sign chiitties for the equipment they were issued for example. It has spread into more general use like many words.

I have not heard it used in the fashion that Paulo has used it but it makes sense similar to calling in a marker.


Paulo to a native speaker the two sounds are different, Imdon't think chit and shit would be confused.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 8:29:56 AM

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Hello Paulo.

I have heard of "cash in one's chips", which is from Casino life in general, not just poker.
It means 'to die'.
cash in one's chips - pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life.
Farlex Thesaurus, Based on WordNet 3.0

A chit or chitti (in the meaning of this idiom) is particularly, I think, referring to a pawnbroker's chit - the receipt you receive and which you need in order to redeem your goods.
But it's so broad now, it can be used for any sort of 'note' or receipt.

I've never heard of 'call in a chit' or 'call in the chips', though.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 2:31:29 PM

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I'd not say "call in a chit" is exactly common in AE, but it is certainly known. It's the same thing as calling in a note.

I automatically associate the word with a chit or IOU in gambling, but it can certainly be used anywhere one would reasonably leave an IOU-type note. A "chit" is essentially the same thing as a "voucher", though voucher usually implies a paper provided by an organization to an individual, whereas a chit may also work the other way. A tab at a bar is a chit or (as mentioned) an IOU in the kitty is a chit. A paper from a company to an employee for use in a company store (usually in lieu of wages and no longer legal) is also a chit.
Paulo Rogério 7
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 2:47:40 PM

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As I said, quite a good way to start a new year! Very enlightening comments and I was particularly comforted to see native people also struggling with some words. Thank you all you guys that take some time to share your expertise in here. In fact, English words are so slippery that I'm always afraid making shit.
thar
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 3:33:28 PM

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I don't think I would ever use 'call in a chit' - I would say 'call in a favour' or something.

But as some simple sort of paperwork for money or permission to do something - yes, I would be given a chit, and give that chit to someone else.

And I agree, in the dialects I know the difference between the ch an sh in those words would be clear. It is a hard ch sound - maybe especially because of its origin, or just because.

Apparently the rumour that chitty chitty bang bang related to British army chits to leave the barracks (and the rest is predictable) is nonsense. But I bet someone enjoyed inventing it. Whistle
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Thursday, January 3, 2019 4:03:59 PM

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thar wrote:
I don't think I would ever use 'call in a chit' - I would say 'call in a favour' or something.

But as some simple sort of paperwork for money or permission to do something - yes, I would be given a chit, and give that chit to someone else.

And I agree, in the dialects I know the difference between the ch an sh in those words would be clear. It is a hard ch sound - maybe especially because of its origin, or just because.

Apparently the rumour that chitty chitty bang bang related to British army chits to leave the barracks (and the rest is predictable) is nonsense. But I bet someone enjoyed inventing it. Whistle


Ian Fleming the writer of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and James Bond was in Naval Intellegence ( just like Bond) the rumours could be about sailors..:Whistle



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 7:00:14 AM
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Sarries -

Oh, I know perfectly well what a 'chit' or 'chitty' is - I spent the first few years of my life in Sri Lanka. But, as an Expat. always regarded the word as outdated Colonial slang.

But what I meant was I had never heard "calling in a chit." The way "chit" was used around me meant simply "a note". It could be from the C.O. or it could be from the fishmonger. It could tell you that your gambling debts were getting too high or it could tell you that the fish your ordered for the party is being delivered that afternoon - it didn't exclusively mean a bill.

So to "call in" a chit didn't mean anything to me - my mother's shopping list was a "chit" - but who'd want to call that in?:Dancing
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 10:11:08 AM

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That's interesting - to me, 'chits' or 'chitties' were a rather specific group of bits of paper.
- a note giving permission to pick up **** from the quartermaster's stores.
- a receipt from the pawnbroker to say that you could redeem you gold watch for a fiver, if you did it before the end of the month.
- a note saying "I owe you a favour".

It always meant a paper which could be exchanged for something more valuable than paper.

Like thar, I would use 'call in a favour' for the meaning given here.

***********
Talking about the usage of the "ch" sound . . .
Where is the most ancient religious centre for the race of Gallus gallus domesticus?

Chichen Itza.

d'oh! Brick wall Ok - it's bad.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Hope123
Posted: Friday, January 4, 2019 10:46:54 AM

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On this side of the (northern) pond we would use both "call in a chit" and "call in a favour" to mean the same thing.

Took me a few seconds Drago - and yes it is bad but.... Applause

The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes/ears. It was their final, most essential command Orwell 1984
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