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An Extract from Fahrenheit 451: "it" and "them" Options
Jurm
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 6:53:08 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/5/2018
Posts: 6
Neurons: 110
Location: Chengdu, Sichuan, China
Here is the https://docs.google.com/document/d/19RYtY-dvWJJy--I5yZtlqllRMmkOWLZSA_41DzGVzF0/edit.

Quote:
"And the second?"
"Leisure."
"Oh, but we've plenty of off-hours."
"Off-hours, yes. But time to think? If you're not driving a hundred miles an hour, at a clip where you can't think of anything else but the danger, then you're playing some game or sitting in some room where you can't argue with the fourwall televisor. Why? The televisor is 'real.' It is immediate, it has dimension. It tells you what to think and blasts it in. It must be, right. It seems so right. It rushes you on so quickly to its own conclusions your mind hasn't time to protest, 'What nonsense!'"
"Only the 'family' is 'people.'"
"I beg your pardon?"
"My wife says books aren't 'real.'"
"Thank God for that. You can shut them, say, 'Hold on a moment.' You play God to it. But who has ever torn himself from the claw that encloses you when you drop a seed in a TV parlour? It grows you any shape it wishes! It is an environment as real as the world. It becomes and is the truth. Books can be beaten down with reason. But with all my knowledge and scepticism, I have never been able to argue with a one-hundred-piece symphony orchestra, full colour, three dimensions, and I being in and part of those incredible parlours. As you see, my parlour is nothing but four plaster walls. And here " He held out two small rubber plugs. "For my ears when I ride the subway-jets."


My question is , what does "it" here refer to? And what does "them" here refer to?
FounDit
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 11:44:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 12,242
Neurons: 60,725
Jurm wrote:
Here is the https://docs.google.com/document/d/19RYtY-dvWJJy--I5yZtlqllRMmkOWLZSA_41DzGVzF0/edit.

Quote:
"And the second?"
"Leisure."
"Oh, but we've plenty of off-hours."
"Off-hours, yes. But time to think? If you're not driving a hundred miles an hour, at a clip where you can't think of anything else but the danger, then you're playing some game or sitting in some room where you can't argue with the fourwall televisor. Why? The televisor is 'real.' It is immediate, it has dimension. It tells you what to think and blasts it in. It must be, right. It seems so right. It rushes you on so quickly to its own conclusions your mind hasn't time to protest, 'What nonsense!'"
"Only the 'family' is 'people.'"
"I beg your pardon?"
"My wife says books aren't 'real.'"
"Thank God for that. You can shut them, say, 'Hold on a moment.' You play God to it. But who has ever torn himself from the claw that encloses you when you drop a seed in a TV parlour? It grows you any shape it wishes! It is an environment as real as the world. It becomes and is the truth. Books can be beaten down with reason. But with all my knowledge and scepticism, I have never been able to argue with a one-hundred-piece symphony orchestra, full colour, three dimensions, and I being in and part of those incredible parlours. As you see, my parlour is nothing but four plaster walls. And here " He held out two small rubber plugs. "For my ears when I ride the subway-jets."


My question is , what does "it" here refer to? And what does "them" here refer to?


The statement is that books are't real. The response is, "Thank God for that." This is said because you can shut books (them). You can play God to it (a book). But you can't do that with the televisor, which blasts its way into your mind without giving you time to think.

So "them" and "it" refer to books.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 1:13:08 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 33,174
Neurons: 208,218
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
That sounds right to me . . .

I think that in formal written English, one would use 'them' in both sentences, and would probably punctuate the line slightly differently - but this is conversational English.

"Thank God for that. You can shut them, say 'Hold on a moment', and play God to them.

A wonderful description of "Super-media, surround-vision". Considering Television was not really common in 1953 - and the normal one at the time was a 13" (33 centimetre) screen and black & white - the author's vision of a "four-wall televisor parlour" is brilliant.
Jurm
Posted: Tuesday, December 25, 2018 4:46:32 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/5/2018
Posts: 6
Neurons: 110
Location: Chengdu, Sichuan, China
Thank you, FounDit and DragOnspeaker! I get it.
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