The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

The book entitled/titled “Basic Buddhism” Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 7:19:49 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 4,883
Neurons: 20,078
The book entitled/titled “Basic Buddhism” was printed in Chinese and English.

Which is the correct word?

Thanks.

Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 7:44:13 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/21/2009
Posts: 42,726
Neurons: 468,590
Location: Helsinki, Southern Finland Province, Finland
When we are talking about books, or such, they are titled. Like J.R.R. Tolkien's The Hobbit, or T.S.Eliot's The Waste Land.


I, myself, am entitled as a Major. That's my title, also my rank in the army, though I'm sort of retired now.


Books are titled, persons are entitled. Just to put it simple ;-)


In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
ChristopherJohnson
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 9:45:15 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/27/2014
Posts: 2,295
Neurons: 1,384,934
Location: Tbilisi, T'bilisi, Georgia
Book or piece of work can be entitled as well.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 12:48:08 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,380
Neurons: 48,295
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

The average person wouldn't use "titled" or "entitled". They would say instead: "The book "Basic Buddhism" was printed in Chinese and English."
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 4:55:12 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 31,701
Neurons: 190,938
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Romany is right - neither word would be used 'normally'.
To be a bit formal, you might say "The book called 'Basic Buddhism' . . ."

However, if you want to be especially formal or fancy, you should (in British English) use 'entitled'.
"Titled" refers to titles like 'Sir', 'Lord', 'Your Majesty'.

ti·tled adj.
Having a title, especially a noble title.

American Heritage Dictionary

titled adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) having a title: the titled classes.

Collins English Dictionary

Adj. 1. titled - belonging to the peerage; "the princess and her coroneted companions"; "the titled classes"
Thesaurus - Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex

There is no definition of 'titled' in The Free Dictionary meaning 'being called' for an object.
The first definition of 'entitled' fits.

en·ti·tle tr.v.
1. To give a name or title to.
2. To furnish with a right or claim to something: The coupon entitles you to a $5 discount.

American Heritage® DictionaryCopyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

entitled adj
1. having a title or name
2. having the right or permission to do something

Collins English Dictionary

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2018 10:34:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2016
Posts: 199
Neurons: 1,254
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, United States
"Titled" as a verb gets hidden under "title" in dictionaries, for instance, in the Oxford dictionary, under "title" we have:

VERB
[with object and complement] Give a name to (a book, composition, or other work)

a report titled The Lost Land
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2018 6:21:37 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,380
Neurons: 48,295
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Eoin -

But aren't all the dictionaries related to TFD the American versions? Even of the Oxford? I certainly get very different answers from hard-copy English dictionaries in many instances than on TFD.

So perhaps - as American society doesn't include titles, neither does that particular interpretation of "title" exist in American speech?
Eoin Riedy
Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2018 10:14:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2016
Posts: 199
Neurons: 1,254
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, United States
Romany wrote:
Eoin -
But aren't all the dictionaries related to TFD the American versions? Even of the Oxford? I certainly get very different answers from hard-copy English dictionaries in many instances than on TFD.
So perhaps - as American society doesn't include titles, neither does that particular interpretation of "title" exist in American speech?


Which particular interpretation of "title"?

The OP concerned the name of a book, and whether it was "titled" or "entitled". In some dictionaries, "titled", in relation to a book, film or painting, is not listed separately, as is "entitled", but only as a past tense of the verb "title".

The Cambridge Dictionary, without separating British and American English, does list "titled" separately, as an adjective, with separate definitions for "titled" in reference to books, films and art, and "titled" in reference to people.

titled adjective (BOOK/FILM/PAINTING)
​[after verb ] with the title of:

Reed wrote a novel about Sade titled "When the Whip Comes Down".

titled adjective (PERSON)
A person who is titled has a special word, such as Sir or Lady, before their own name, showing that they have a high social rank:

one of his titled friends


So "The book titled 'Basic Buddhism' was printed in Chinese and English" is not incorrect, just a bit wordy.

The other meanings of "titled" and "entitled" are sidetracks in relation to the original question.
CamNewton
Posted: Saturday, December 22, 2018 10:39:35 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 11/25/2018
Posts: 19
Neurons: 69
Location: Asheville, North Carolina, United States
Koh Elaine wrote:
The book entitled/titled “Basic Buddhism” was printed in Chinese and English.

Which is the correct word?

Thanks.


This thread has good discussion, but the key thing to know here is that any difference between these words has been erased. You could use either one of these words and even a pedant wouldn't have a problem.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 3:15:04 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 31,701
Neurons: 190,938
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
CamNewton wrote:
You could use either one of these words and even a pedant wouldn't have a problem.

Maybe that's true in America.

However, the ONLY definition of "titled" as an adjective in the Oxford ENGLISH Dictionary is this:
titled
ADJECTIVE
(of a person) having a title indicating high social or official rank.
‘many titled guests were always invited’


And it is the same in the Oxford AMERICAN Dictionary.

That word in that sentence is an adjective, not really a verb, to me. This is the case of an adjectival phrase (entitled "Basic Buddhism") following the object of a factitive verb - though in this case the sentence is passive, "book entitled 'Basic Buddhism'" is the object of the verb "printed".
When the adjective modifies the object of factitive verbs
Factitive verbs are used to describe an action that results in a new condition or state of a person or thing. When an adjective modifies the direct object of a factitive verb, it is known as an object complement, and we place it in the postpositive position. For example:
“He makes her happy.”
“I find horror films terrifying.”
“We painted the wall yellow.”

Farlex Grammar


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, December 24, 2018 6:47:49 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,380
Neurons: 48,295
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Agree with Drago - in British and Commonwealth countries, as well as across Europe, there is, most definitely, a difference - because our cultures differ.

The American system does not bestow titles; therefore if the concept doesn't exist, there is no need of a word to describe it?
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2019 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.