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towan52
Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 12:02:39 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2012
Posts: 1,785
Neurons: 192,899
Location: Midland, Texas, United States
Following yesterday's communique from the White House, There has been a change to Webster's Dictionary.

The word "Smoking" and its derivatives have been replaced by "Smocking" The new word will be conjugated as regular verb. This means that "going for a smoke" is now amended to, "Going for a smock". Peasants and farm-workers everywhere will now wear "Smokes" instead of "Smocks". Please be sure to adjust your spell-check programs accordingly. Whistle


"Of all the liars in the world, sometimes the worst are your own fears. ~ Rudyard Kipling "
taurine
Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 12:31:04 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/20/2016
Posts: 1,033
Neurons: 80,370
Location: South Dublin, Ireland
Well, well...
Going for a smock now takes on a new, healthy shape, namely:



le vert est un nouveau noir
TL Hobs
Posted: Tuesday, December 11, 2018 1:56:54 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 4/16/2009
Posts: 1,394
Neurons: 5,576
Location: Kenai, Alaska, United States
It's what happens when you spell with your gut, rather than your head, or education.

Very cofefe, don't you think?

"When you don't know where you are going, you have to stick together just in case someone gets there." - Ken Kesey
towan52
Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 12:14:34 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/28/2012
Posts: 1,785
Neurons: 192,899
Location: Midland, Texas, United States
TL Hobs wrote:
It's what happens when you spell with your gut, rather than your head, or education.

Very cofefe, don't you think?


From the Urban Dictionary: Cofefe - A word used to summon the Antichrist and his minions to your service. Or, in other words, a presidential election!

"Of all the liars in the world, sometimes the worst are your own fears. ~ Rudyard Kipling "
Y111
Posted: Wednesday, December 12, 2018 11:05:37 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/25/2017
Posts: 296
Neurons: 1,464
Location: Kurgan, Kurgan, Russia
'Cofefe' is a misspelling of 'covfefe'.
Romany
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 7:34:59 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,133
Neurons: 47,476
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Y111,

I think, if you go and look up both words "covfefe" and "cofefe" you will understand the meaning of both words to be different.

"Covfefe" = "The mighty and terrible god of internet typos. The mysterious and all-knowing overlord of the Twitter trolls, and Pepe is his prophet. On this the 30th day of May, he was summoned by the orange king to begin his reign of terror over the lawless wasteland of cyberspace. And it shall be that no blogger, no profile, no Twitter egg shall know peace in the hereafter until they have bowed in reverence and fear at the glorious might of Covfefe."

Whereas, as Towan explained, "cofefe" is another word and has another meaning.
Y111
Posted: Friday, December 14, 2018 11:26:05 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/25/2017
Posts: 296
Neurons: 1,464
Location: Kurgan, Kurgan, Russia
I looked both of them up before writing that post. However, 'cofefe' is clearly a misspelling of 'covfefe' (the word invented by Trump) even if it has acquired a meaning of its own.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 6:33:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,133
Neurons: 47,476
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

OK, well fine: that's one way of looking at it.

Another is: as there is no such word as "Covfefe" there is no way to "missspell" it. Instead, two variants exist of a nonsense-word and each have their own meaning.

By using the declarative "Cofefe IS a misspelling of covfefe" the implication is that you have personal knowledge and facts to prove what you say, so that anyone who doesn't agree with you is wrong.

This is one of the reasons we find it rather impolite to make declarative sentences - even when we KNOW we're correct. Hence the use of introductory phrases such as: "I wonder if...?" "It seems likeley that..." or even "I personally think that..."

This way there is no implication that the other person is wrong. One is asking a question; declaring a personally-held belief; initiating a discussion. All of which are aids to conversation/discussion.

A declarative "THIS IS..." statement is an easy path to argument, heated emotions, or a full-blown row.
Y111
Posted: Saturday, December 15, 2018 9:02:19 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/25/2017
Posts: 296
Neurons: 1,464
Location: Kurgan, Kurgan, Russia
Thank you, Romany. I will try to be less blunt in the future.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2018 7:19:04 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 15,133
Neurons: 47,476
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Y111

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