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It's mannequin. Options
bihunsedap
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 8:26:48 PM

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I took my son to clothes shop.

He saw the mannequin without head and scared.

"That is not real people. It's a mannequin." I told him.

What word is suitable for a kid to more understand it.

palapaguy
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 8:37:24 PM

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Dummy or model.
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 5:11:42 AM
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In BE we don't use "dummy"; some people may say "model", but mostly we say 'mannequin'.

A child who can say "banana" (ba-na-na) can also say mannequin (man-a-kwin).
bihunsedap
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 8:12:47 PM

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Thanks all.
palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 10:37:11 PM

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Romany wrote:

In BE we don't use "dummy"; some people may say "model", but mostly we say 'mannequin'.

A child who can say "banana" (ba-na-na) can also say mannequin (man-a-kwin).


But we Yanks say (man-a-kin).
Like this speaker: https://www.google.com/search?q=mannequin&oq=mannequin&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j69i60l2j69i61j0l2.6476j0j7&client=ubuntu&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 4:13:46 AM

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I never knew that.
To me, a manikin (which is what that sounds like) has a separate meaning.

It is a diminutive man (That's the etymology, and it retains that meaning - dwarf, one of the "little people").

It's also an anatomically correct model for use in medical teaching.
The manikin used in CPR training (which has mechanical lungs and sinuses, etc) is always called Annie.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, December 5, 2018 4:49:45 AM
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Yes Drago - a manikin (Old English)comes from Frisian and means "little man", while a 'mannequin'(Middle English) came to us through the French - originally in the Artists world: a person/body who is used as a 'model' for a painter. So we pronounce the first "man-a-kin" while the second is "man-a-quin". (Purely so people don't cart plaster figures from shops into CPR training classes.)
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