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No matter what Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Sunday, December 2, 2018 10:34:34 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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Mechanics is the branch of Physics dealing with the study of motion. No matter what your interest in science or engineering, mechanics will be important for you - motion is a fundamental idea in all of science.
http://www.batesville.k12.in.us/physics/PhyNet/Mechanics/MechOverview.html
Please explain the use of "what" in "no matter what..."
FounDit
Posted: Sunday, December 2, 2018 12:39:54 PM

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Jigneshbharati wrote:
Mechanics is the branch of Physics dealing with the study of motion. No matter what your interest in science or engineering, mechanics will be important for you - motion is a fundamental idea in all of science.
http://www.batesville.k12.in.us/physics/PhyNet/Mechanics/MechOverview.html
Please explain the use of "what" in "no matter what..."


There are many fields of interest in science and engineering. There is biology, chemistry, nuclear, medicine, structural engineering, electrical engineering, etc. So which one holds your interest?

The phrase "no matter what your interest" means which area of science or engineering is the one that holds your interest. What is your interest? In your case, it would be pharmacology.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Sunday, December 2, 2018 12:50:21 PM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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Thanks.
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 1:35:32 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 1,896
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Is "what your interest" a noun clause with "what" as a relative pronoun?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 6:00:42 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

"What your interest" is not a clause - it does not have a verb - but it does (sort of) replace a clause.

You have two idiomatic usages combined in this sentence.
Firstly, "no matter" is an idiom meaning 'regardless' or 'regardless of' or even "It doesn't matter".
Secondly, after the phrase 'No matter what', a noun is often used to replace a clause (though this doesn't fit the 'normal rules').

Together, that means that "No matter what your interest" is equivalent to "It doesn't matter what you're interested in".

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 6:33:37 AM
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Thanks. is that part grammatical without a verb?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 3, 2018 8:09:14 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It is grammatical - - as that is what people say.

Grammar is the description of how people use the language.

But, that's why I said it was 'an idiom' - or two idioms - because idioms do not follow the rules of normal grammar, quite often.

The phrase "No matter what + <noun>" has its own meaning and use.

"No matter what the cost, get me an MG!" (an MG is a classic car)
"It doesn't matter how much it costs, get me an MG!"

"Get me an MG, no matter what!"
"Get me an MG regardless of any problems."

"Find a babysitter - no matter who."
"Find a babysitter - It doesn't matter who it is."

The common 'patterns' of sentences do not apply to idioms.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 1:57:51 AM
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Joined: 11/3/2016
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Thanks. Is "matter" a noun or verb here?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, December 4, 2018 3:37:33 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,685
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
It is a phrase - an idiom.

One dictionary shows it as either a preposition (equivalent to 'regardless of') or as a full sentence substitute.

15. no matter
a. regardless of; irrespective of: no matter what the excuse, you must not be late.
b. (sentence substitute) it is unimportant

American Heritage


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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