The Free Dictionary  
mailing list For webmasters
Welcome Guest Forum Search | Active Topics | Members

admit" to allow (someone) to enter a place. (Verbs) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 12:26:53 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,878
Neurons: 10,557
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!
AFAIK,
"admit" to allow (someone) to enter a place.
Senior citizens are admitted free to the museum.

However, I am wondering if a patient does need to have a permission to enter a hospital in order to this statement below was phrased like that.
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fell in her office and fractured three ribs. The 85-year-old liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
FounDit
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 12:36:09 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,725
Neurons: 51,343
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!
AFAIK,
"admit" to allow (someone) to enter a place.
Senior citizens are admitted free to the museum.
Does a patient need to have a permission to enter a hospital in order to this statement below was phrased like that?
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fell in her office and fractured three ribs. The 85-year-old liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.

One definition of "admit" means to be accepted into hospital as a patient, so the sentence is correct.

FROM TFD:
3.
d. To accept (someone) as an inpatient in a hospital.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 12:53:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,878
Neurons: 10,557
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
FounDit wrote:
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!
AFAIK,
"admit" to allow (someone) to enter a place.
Senior citizens are admitted free to the museum.
Does a patient need to have a permission to enter a hospital in order to this statement below was phrased like that?
Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg fell in her office and fractured three ribs. The 85-year-old liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.

One definition of "admit" means to be accepted into hospital as a patient, so the sentence is correct.


FROM TFD:
3.
d. To accept (someone) as an inpatient in a hospital.


Thanks a lot, FoundDit
But, the active form of the passive infinitive "to be accepted" is "to someone accepts you"
"To someone accepts you as a patient, for instance, to enter a hospital."

The 85-year-old liberal justice was accepted into a hospital Thursday.=>Someone accepted the 85-year-old liberal justice into a hospital Thursday.
The 85-year-old liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.=> Someone admitted the 85-year-old liberal justice to a hospital.

If that someone didn't accept you as a patient to enter a hospital, then what could you do?
So, I am wondering if a patient does need to have a permission to enter a hospital or not.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
NKM
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 1:59:24 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,958
Neurons: 275,173
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
"Admitted to a/the hospital" is a rather specific idiom; it simply means "hospitalized".

(British English might well omit the article, and might change "hospitalized" to "hospitalised".)

Romany
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 3:13:57 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
Neurons: 45,412
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

I would amend the meaning from "allow" to "enable to enter".

We don't really use "allow" for grown people. (well at least not in BE) It's only children who are "allowed" or "not allowed" to do something.

But, no-one can just turn up at a hospital and jump into a nearby bed. There is a process to go through. Until that process has been conducted (showing I.D.; giving your Healthcare number; signing forms etc.) no-one know where to put you, what's wrong with you etc. You can't go in: not because you're "not allowed". But because you haven't completed the "admittance process."

A lawyer is "admitted to the Bar" - it doesn't mean that previously they weren't allowed in a Courtroom and now they are. It means they've completed all the process of becoming a lawyer.

If we "admit" someone to a private society or club it isn't considered "allowing" them to join - it's because they've fulfilled the admittance procedure.In this case that could be writing books; or finding a cure for cancer - depending on the nature of the club/society.
A cooperator
Posted: Friday, November 9, 2018 8:19:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,878
Neurons: 10,557
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Thank you both of you, NKM, and Romany

"to be admitted" which means "to enable to enter" is always used in a passivised form.

The 85-year-old liberal justice was hospitalized Thursday.
The 85-year-old liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.
A lawyer is admitted to the Bar.



Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 7:05:17 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,541
Neurons: 45,412
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom

Yes that's right.

However, "liberal justice" is a concept; a political stance. It doesn't make sense to admit a political ideology to a hospital!

One could say:

"The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised....." - because it is the person who holds these views who has been hospitalised - not the actual ideology.
A cooperator
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 10:44:59 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,878
Neurons: 10,557
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Romany wrote:

Yes that's right.

However, "liberal justice" is a concept; a political stance. It doesn't make sense to admit a political ideology to a hospital!

One could say:


"The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised....." - because it is the person who holds these views who has been hospitalised - not the actual ideology.


Thanks to you.

I have only two more questions pertinent to this topic on this thread, the first one is if an applicant applied for a place at a university, was given an admissions offer, then we could have said "You have been admitted for a place."

The other one is when "admit" is paired with "to" or "for". I have looked up "admit for" in my Longman dictionary, but I didn't find any.

As NKM said "Admitted to a/the hospital" is a rather specific idiom; it simply means "hospitalized".

Thus, with the meaning "enable to enter":
1- "admitted to a hospital" means "hospitalised"
The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.=>The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised Thursday.
2- "admitted for observation and treatment"/ "admitted for a place at a university" means what.
"She went home, but after experiencing discomfort overnight, went to George Washington University Hospital early this morning," the court said in a statement Thursday. "Tests showed that she fractured three ribs on her left side and she was admitted for observation and treatment."

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, November 10, 2018 12:20:37 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,725
Neurons: 51,343
A cooperator wrote:
Romany wrote:

Yes that's right.

However, "liberal justice" is a concept; a political stance. It doesn't make sense to admit a political ideology to a hospital!

One could say:


"The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised....." - because it is the person who holds these views who has been hospitalised - not the actual ideology.


Thanks to you.

I have only two more questions pertinent to this topic on this thread, the first one is if an applicant applied for a place at a university, was given an admissions offer, then we could have said "You have been admitted for a place."

The other one is when "admit" is paired with "to" or "for". I have looked up "admit for" in my Longman dictionary, but I didn't find any.

As NKM said "Admitted to a/the hospital" is a rather specific idiom; it simply means "hospitalized".

Thus, with the meaning "enable to enter":
1- "admitted to a hospital" means "hospitalised"
The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was admitted to a hospital Thursday.=>The 85-year-old fighter for liberal justice was hospitalised Thursday.
2- "admitted for observation and treatment"/ "admitted for a place at a university" means what.
"She went home, but after experiencing discomfort overnight, went to George Washington University Hospital early this morning," the court said in a statement Thursday. "Tests showed that she fractured three ribs on her left side and she was admitted for observation and treatment."


I didn't make my response clear enough. Romany provided the most important point when she said it is a process that has to be completed before someone can say they were "admitted" into a hospital, or a teaching position.

It is the finality of the process that results in the "admitting". So when we say someone was admitted for observation, or into a hospital, what we are saying is that they went through the process and then were taken into the hospital. In the case of a University, the person went through the process of submitting an application, a CV, having it reviewed, a background check and criminal history, etc., and after all of that, they may be admitted.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Users browsing this topic
Guest


Forum Jump
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Main Forum RSS : RSS
Forum Terms and Guidelines | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2008-2018 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.