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Open/opening inverted commas and close/closing inverted commas Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 8:33:51 AM
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Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 4,349
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1. Should it be "opening inverted commas" or "open inverted commas"?

2. Should it be "closing inverted commas" or "close inverted commas"?

Thanks.



thar
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 9:45:18 AM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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Open and close, because if you are saying this out loud you are giving instructions, imperatives>
- now you should open some inverted commas.... now you should close the inverted commas.....

put much more succinctly as>
open inverted commas....... close inverted commas......

You are not describing the type of inverted commas, or their function. They are the same at each end. You just open them and close them, to show that section is finished. Whistle
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 6, 2018 2:10:16 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,386
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi! Anxious Eh?

I disagree with thar, in that he is only looking at "Open inverted commas" or "Close inverted commas" as sentences.

As phrases, used as nouns, the correct phrase would be "opening inverted commas" and "closing inverted commas.

When one asks for the correct phrase, one must say how one wants to use it.

When giving dictation (telling someone what to write) you might say this:
"He stood up and said - open inverted commas - Hello - exclamation point - close inverted commas."

When describing a sentence - He sat down, closed his eyes and said Hello, Daniel. - one might say:
The punctuation is not bad, but it needs opening inverted commas before the "Hello" and closing inverted commas at the end after the full stop.

In the typeface you see here, you could omit "opening" and "closing". They are the same ( " ).

In some typefaces, they are different.
Opening inverted commas - ˵ or ‘ or “
Closing inverted commas - ˶ or ’ or ”

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, November 7, 2018 9:15:54 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 4,349
Neurons: 17,680
Thanks, DragOnspeaker.

When describing a sentence - He sat down, closed his eyes and said Hello, Daniel. - one might say:
The punctuation is not bad, but it needs opening inverted commas before the "Hello" and closing inverted commas at the end after the full stop. (Shouldn't it be 'comma'?)

1. He sat down, closed his eyes and said "Hello," Daniel.

2. He sat down, closed his eyes and said "Hello", Daniel.

Should the comma be inside or outside the closing inverted commas in logical (British) punctuation?
Do Americans put the comma inside the closing inverted commas, as in the first sentence?
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 10:09:16 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 4,349
Neurons: 17,680
Thanks, DragOnspeaker.

When describing a sentence - He sat down, closed his eyes and said Hello, Daniel. - one might say:
The punctuation is not bad, but it needs opening inverted commas before the "Hello" and closing inverted commas at the end after the full stop.

He sat down, closed his eyes and said: "Hello, Daniel."

[Note: Sorry! I misinterpreted. The dialogue should be, as shown above.]
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, November 12, 2018 12:17:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,386
Neurons: 179,170
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi! You corrected yourself!
Well done.

There is a difference between the two major styles of punctuation in that sort of circumstance.

For example, it the person says "Thanks, Danny, for your great help."

That is very simple in "usual" writing.

"Thanks, Danny, for your great help", he said.
He said "Thanks, Danny, for your great help."


However, if you put the 'he said' in the middle, it's not easy. I would only normally do it where there is already a comma.
My 'rule' is 'Put a comma where there's a pause.' If I say it aloud, this is what I end up with.

"Thanks, Danny," he said, "for your great help."
I don't add any commas to the quotation.

************
It is when there is not already a comma that it is 'questionable'.

"Thanks for your great help, Danny."

What is known as 'American punctuation - though a lot of Americans don't use it - inserts a random comma into the quotation which is not there in the original.
"Thanks," he said, "for your great help, Danny."
(So the quotation now looks like "Thanks, for your great help, Danny." - a bit 'odd'.)

What is known as 'British Punctuation' or 'logical punctuation' (which a lot of British people don't use) is more logical.
"Thanks", he said, "for your great help, Danny."
Here, the quotation is left unchanged - and I add 'comma he said comma' in the middle.
The commas logically connect to the 'he said', separating that from the quote.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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