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2 interrogative sentences Options
onsen
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 7:46:25 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 237
Neurons: 4,841
Hello,

Quote:
A. The 1970s saw the beginnings of a new technological revolution, based on microelectronics.
(Longman Language Activator)

B. I saw them playing baseball with classmates of another school.
(self-made sentence)


How does one make interrogative sentences so that the answers the questioner expects are the 'microelectronics' and 'classmates of another school' in the given sentences, respectively?

My try.
For A:
Based on what did the 1970s see the beginnings of a new technological revolution?
For B:
Who did you see them playing baseball with?

Thank you.


thar
Posted: Thursday, November 8, 2018 8:40:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 17,995
Neurons: 73,002
onsen wrote:
Hello,

Quote:
A. The 1970s saw the beginnings of a new technological revolution, based on microelectronics.
(Longman Language Activator)

B. I saw them playing baseball with classmates of another school.
(self-made sentence)


How does one make interrogative sentences so that the answers the questioner expects are the 'microelectronics' and 'classmates of another school' in the given sentences, respectively?

My try.
For A:
Based on what did the 1970s see the beginnings of a new technological revolution?
This is far too complicated and clumsy. Unnecessarily so. The original sentence contains verbal structures you don't need, like 'saw the beginning of...'

If you make a question, you keep to simple facts.
What does that sentence actually say? A technological revolution started in the 1970s. It was based on microelectronics.
So:
What was the technological revolution of the 1970s based on?
Or, because that is a very open question and invites all sorts of answers, you can give information and then state a question.

The 1970s saw the beginning of a technological revolution. What was it based on?

(I don't want to write 'new revolution' - it seems completely redundant to me. You don't get old revolutions!)

But your question contains too many irrelevant ideas - by the time you get to the end you have forgotten what the question was. To be a good question it has to be understandable, not just be the correct grammatical structure.



For B:
Who did you see them playing baseball with?
Yes, this is fine. A simple idea - who?

As a vocabulary point, they can't be 'classmates from another school'. Your classmates are people in the same class as you - you share lessons with them, share desks. If they are from another school, then they are not classmates of the 'them' you refer to. And you don't know if they are classmates with each other at the other school, if you aren't there. They are just pupils/students/children/boys etc from another school.
Does that make sense?


Thank you.


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