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''Yet'' in affirmitive questions? Options
ullas84
Posted: Saturday, November 3, 2018 3:24:27 PM
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What is the function of ''Yet'' in affirmitive questions?

A)Have you eaten yet?

B)Have you eaten?

What is the difference between sentence a and sentence b in the meaning? (The function of yet )
RuthP
Posted: Saturday, November 3, 2018 4:01:12 PM

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ullas84 wrote:
What is the function of ''Yet'' in affirmitive questions?

A)Have you eaten yet?

B)Have you eaten?

What is the difference between sentence a and sentence b in the meaning? (The function of yet )

Practically speaking, both questions ask for the same information: "Have you already eaten?" and (implied) "Should we/you eat now?"

Question (B) is a neutral question. It assumes nothing about the likelihood or the desirability of your having already consumed food. Question (A), on the other hand, probably implies something about you, food, and the current situation. Exactly what it implies will depend upon context: What has happened before--either immediately before "now" or during similar instances in the past; what is or should be known by the various participants--both the questioner and "you"; what is supposed to occur "now" or in the near future.

1) You are coming to visit a friend. Your friend picks you up at the airport. Perhaps your flight was delayed and you arrived much later than expected. Your friend lives two hours away from the airport. "Yet" could express concern: were you able to eat during your over-long trip, or should the two of you stop and eat before taking two more hours to get to her house.

2) You are coming to visit a friend. Your friend picks you up at the airport. You are supposed to go quickly to a trailhead, where you are to meet the rest of your group and start a trek into the wilderness. Your stomach growls. The "yet" here may mean irritation: if you did not take care of feeding yourself before this time, then you may delay the start for everyone and make the first day much less successful.

3) Your family is getting ready to go on vacation. Your mom asks the question. "Yet" may means something like this: "Have you eaten yet? Because, you know, the last time we left and you hadn't eaten you got carsick and threw up all over the back seat." Yes, all that can be communicated in one word, if your mom's tone of voice and body language are good enough.

The use of "yet" would not be necessary in any of these cases; it just adds emphasis to the sentence. Such emphasis is usually mild, and use of the word may often really be one of those unnecessary words used by a speaker that simply gives a speaker a little more time to figure out (not consciously figure out, just work out in the back of one's head without even realizing it) what the speaker will say next. If the emphasis is not mild, it will be conveyed in tone of voice and body language that expresses (depending upon the circumstances) anything from serious concern for "you" to deep annoyance with "you".
Tyoma
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 1:46:35 AM
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Joined: 10/31/2018
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Wow! What a comprehensive and detailed explanation of just one tiny word! And the examples are very helpful.
Thanks a lot, Ruth.
ullas84
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 3:51:49 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/19/2018
Posts: 12
Neurons: 85
I am searching information for 2 days about the subject(''yet'' in affirmitive questions), and I found an explanation at Cambridge Grammar

webpage.

The explanation is ;

When we use ''yet'' in an affirmative question, it shows that the speaker is expecting something to happen:

A)İs he home yet? (I expect that he will be home at some point.)

B)Has your passport arrived yet? (I expect that your passport will arrive in the post.)

But I have confusion about this explanation.

Are not these sentences supposed to mean;

A)İs he home yet?..................I expect that he has already been at home.

B)Has your passport arrived yet?....I expect that your passport has arrived in the post.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 5:02:27 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi ullas.

Not really - but partly.

When you use 'yet' in that way, you expect an answer. You are certain 'the thing' "has happened, is happening or will happen".

It is a timeless certainty.
The answer to the question will give you enough information to make the expectation more specific.

If the answer is "Yes - he arrived", then you can stop worrying.
If the answer is "No" - then you know to expect the arrival in the future.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
ullas84
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 8:44:38 AM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 10/19/2018
Posts: 12
Neurons: 85
Thanks for the replies
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 4, 2018 9:47:03 AM
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Joined: 6/14/2009
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Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Ruth -

a propos your post. Did you know that, in all forms of major Chinese language, rather than greeting with "How are you?" what one says is "Have you eaten yet?"

(Yeah, I know: full of snippets of info. no-one is particularly interested in, me.)
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