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'recruiter' Vs. 'recruit' (kinds of words along with their antonyms, and their synonyms) Options
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 3:44:22 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
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Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Hi Everyone!

First of all, if I am going to categorize/list such words(in case nouns), along with their antonyms, and their synonyms to help memorize them. You see it helpful.

A recruiter is a person whose job is to enlist or enroll people as employees, in the armed forces, or as members of an organization.
A list of antonyms:-
A recruit is a person who has just joined the army or another organization and not yet trained.

I can understand meaning of 'recruiter' and 'recruit' with the same concept in the words below:

A hirer(employer/guvnor/boss) is defined as a person who employs someone else. An example of a hirer is a company boss./a person or firm that employs workers/a person responsible for hiring workers.

A list of antonyms:-
A hiree(employee/ labourer(laborer)/staff member / underling / worker) is a person who is hired to do something

A subordinate(Underlining/ lackey): one of lesser rank or authority than another.
A list of antonyms:-
an insubordinate /guvnor/boss/chief/ commander/ leader/ major manager/ master/ superior/ supervisor

A host (masculine) and hostess (feminine) most often refer to a person responsible for guests at an event or providing hospitality during it.
A list of antonyms:-
A guest is a person who is invited to visit the home of or take part in a function organized by another.

A creditor: one to whom money or its equivalent is owed. 1 the person to whom a debt is owed by a debtor.
2 in relation to a bankrupt, a person to whom any of the bankruptcy debts are owed (as specified in the bankruptcy order). 3 an individual who would be a creditor in the bankruptcy if a bankruptcy order were made on that petition.
A list of antonyms:-
A debtor: a person or entity that owes an amount of money or favor to another

Contractor(independent contractor)
A contractor: someone (a person or firm) who contracts to build things
A list of antonyms:-
An employee

A constructor(builder) - someone who contracts for and supervises construction (as of a building)
A list of antonyms:-
A destroyer (wrecker):


Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
thar
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 4:33:00 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,187
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I just have a couple of things to comment on.

A subordinate is someone who is under you (like a subway goes underground).
So the opposite is a superior (super = over).
Insubordinate means rude, insolent. It is only the opposite of subordinate when being subordinate means meekly obeying orders. Being insubordinate means being rude and refusing to obey orders.

Hirer and hiree are not natural words. You have someone who hires you, and you are hired, but not a hirer or hiree.


A contractor is not the opposite of employee - they are just alternative ways you might run your business. You might hire a contractor do work for you, instead of employing your own people to do it. But the contractor may have employees. They are not opposites, just different ways of paying people to work for you

Never call someone a lackey - it is an insult!

The synonyms and antonyms you get from a dictionary need to be used with care.
Calling someone an employee is factual.
Calling them a subordinate is only appropriate when.... no, I can't think of a good time to say that.

Calling them an underling or lackey is extremely disrespectful.

RuthP
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 5:50:48 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/2/2009
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Location: Drain, Oregon, United States
A cooperator wrote:
Hi Everyone!

First of all, if I am going to categorize/list such words(in case nouns), along with their antonyms, and their synonyms to help memorize them. You see it helpful.

A recruiter is a person whose job is to enlist or enroll people as employees, in the armed forces, or as members of an organization.
A list of antonyms:-
A recruit is a person who has just joined the army or another organization and not yet trained.

I can understand meaning of 'recruiter' and 'recruit' with the same concept in the words below:
Beyond any doubt, you are right that pairing ideas and the words that describe them helps with language learning. Most of the word pairs you have are complementary rather than antonymic. That is, they relate to each other, they complement each other, but they are not really opposites. It does not hurt for you to think of them as opposites in your mind, but if you were to use them as examples of antonyms on an exam, you would likely be marked wrong.

A hirer(employer/guvnor/boss) is defined as a person who employs someone else. An example of a hirer is a company boss./a person or firm that employs workers/a person responsible for hiring workers. "Guvnor" is a corruption of the word "governor". This may be a synonym of "employer" in BE. It is not in AE. In AE, "boss" is a person in charge. It may represent anyone from the head of a company to a front line supervisor. A "boss" may or may not hire people. A person who hires people may or may not be the person who supervises (informal: bosses) them. "Boss" is a relatively informal term. It is commonly used, but it is not a part of job descriptions or titles.

A list of antonyms:-The antonym for someone who hires people is someone who fires people, i.e. ends their employment. "Hirer" is not a US usage, though I suppose it is possible there is a legal jargon use of the word. I suppose if you use "hirer" you could also use "firer". Again, it is not used that way in formal AE, though I could imagine someone using it in casual conversation. The only use of "firer" I am aware of in AE is the firer of a weapon. It is not common, however.
A hiree(employee/ labourer(laborer)/staff member / underling / worker) is a person who is hired to do something These words are related, but be aware they don't mean exactly the same thing. "Hiree" is relatively uncommon in AE. It would be used for someone recently hired. It would probably imply the person has not yet finished a probationary period and is not yet considered a full employee.

A laborer indicates one who does a specific kind of work, which involves a not insignificant degree of physical labor. Carpenters, framers, plumbers, electricians, highway construction workers, steeplejacks are all examples of laborers. A laborer may or may not be an employee. A plumber or electrician, for example, may be in business for herself. She is still a laborer, but she is not an employee.

An employee, staff member, underling, and probably--though not always--worker are roughly equivalent. Note that "underling" is not generally a preferred term. It has somewhat demeaning overtones to it.


A subordinate(Underlining/ lackey): one of lesser rank or authority than another. Careful. "Underling" is not wrong, but it may be perceived as demeaning. "Lackey" is not acceptable. It implies a mindless follower, who will follow any direction given by a boss. It carries reasonably strong overtones of a boot licker or a brown noser. Of all these words, "subordinate" is the only one I would use.
A list of antonyms:-
an insubordinate /guvnor/boss/chief/ commander/ leader/ major manager/ master/ superior/ supervisor Be careful here. "Master" is not in any way equivalent to boss, leader, or commander today. The only time "master" is acceptable in a work context is is in referring to a position such as "master carpenter" a term which traces its roots back to guilds. It is use in trade unions, where people start as apprentices. This is uncommon in most jobs. Otherwise "master" is, at least in AE, traces back to master/slave and is a completely inappropriate and unacceptable way to refer to a boss or supervisor. "Guvnor" see above: a corruption; not used in AE. "Boss" is someone in charge and is a superior of some employee(s). It is an inexact term, but is commonly used and usually appropriate. "Chief" is not an official term. It is a not uncommon casual reference to a boss. You need to know the individual and the organization/business to know whether it is appropriate, though it is unlikely to be offensive. "Commander" is reserved for military and paramilitary (e.g. police or sheriff) organizations. It is not a civilian usage. "Leader" is a description of one who leads others. It usually implies voluntary followers. It is used in only limited circumstances in relation to employment. You may have a "group leader" for a group of employees, but that would more commonly be applied in the case of a group of coworkers working together on a project. It is less likely to refer to a supervisor or boss. One can refer to the leader of a company, but that is not usually an actual job title. "Manager" is a common, acceptable term and is often a job title or part of a job title. The same is true of "supervisor". "Superior" is used to describe someone who is the manager or supervisor of another; it is not generally a job title. It should be used carefully, because it may be interpreted to mean "a better person", which is not what is meant.

When paired, "subordinate" and "insubordinate" are adjectives, referring to behavior. (This is different from a "subordinate" at work who is under the direction of a "boss".) "Subordinate behavior" is that of following orders or directions and includes deferring to people in supervisory positions. It carries overtones of cringing behavior and borders on the behavior one would expect in a lackey. It implies that the person showing subordinate behavior is accorded less worth, is considered a lower being. The actual antonym is "dominant". This likely reflects the move of "subordinate" to a term which usually carries demeaning overtones. The only place I can think of right now where "subordinate" is still used in a simply descriptive (no pejorative) sense is in the military, where one has subordinate (lower grade) officers. That is a simple statement of fact and is in no way offensive.

"Insubordinate" has come to mean something close to inappropriately impolite behavior toward a person in charge. In the military, insubordination is grounds for serious disciplinary action up to and including court martial. In the most casual usage, it means insufficient deference. In a work setting, it probably means failing to follow the direct order of a supervisor, or knowingly disobeying company rules or regulations. Neither "subordinate" nor "insubordinate" in this sense is a word one really wishes as a descriptor.


A host (masculine) and hostess (feminine) most often refer to a person responsible for guests at an event or providing hospitality during it.
A list of antonyms:-
A guest is a person who is invited to visit the home of or take part in a function organized by another. Again, you do not actually have an antonym here. A host usually is the one who invites people, although one may host, i.e. be responsible for the comfort of the guests, without being the one who invited the guests. This was more commonly used with "hostess" and represented a situation where the "host" was a male, who invited everyone and got credit for the event, while the "hostess" was the female, usually the wife or failing a wife, a daughter, sister, or mother who had to do all the work. "Hostess" is losing favor in AE. Women, as well as men, are increasingly referred to as "hosts". The antonym of "host" would be one who takes away the comfort of guests, or one who refuses entry to the house or facility. Perhaps, one could use "bouncer" as the antonym of "host".

A creditor: one to whom money or its equivalent is owed. 1 the person to whom a debt is owed by a debtor.
2 in relation to a bankrupt, a person to whom any of the bankruptcy debts are owed (as specified in the bankruptcy order). 3 an individual who would be a creditor in the bankruptcy if a bankruptcy order were made on that petition.
A list of antonyms:-
A debtor: a person or entity that owes an amount of money or favor to another
Here, you are much closer to synonym and antonym: A creditor is owed money; a debtor owes money. This works only in the context of money, however. If someone has done me a favor, I am in their debt. I would not, however, be called a debtor, even if it does seem that would be reasonable.

Contractor(independent contractor)
A contractor: someone (a person or firm) who contracts to build things
A list of antonyms:-
An employee Here again, you are in the realm of opposites and, yes, antonym works. An employee works for someone else. An independent contractor agrees to and signs a legal contract to perform work for someone, but is not considered an employee of that person.

A constructor(builder) - someone who contracts for and supervises construction (as of a building)
A list of antonyms:-
A destroyer (wrecker): Hmmm. In one sense, yes. A "wrecker" or "destroyer" would be the opposite of a "constructor" (not a common word) or a "builder". In the world of construction, however, which is the term used for all the building trades taken together, "wrecking" is done by "demolition" crews, who are considered a part of the construction trades. (Just to be confusing.)
A cooperator
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 9:53:40 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,955
Neurons: 11,004
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Thank you all of you,
But, do you think this is the difference between 'a recruiter' and its opposite, 'a recruit', like in 'a host', and 'a guest'. That is the way that I think of.
A recruiter is a person whose job is to enlist or enroll people as employees, in the armed forces, or as members of an organization.
A list of antonyms:-
"A recruit" is a person who has just joined the army or another organization and not yet trained.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 3:04:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,664
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!

I understand what you mean. Your definitions are correct and they show two views of the same activity (recruiting) - but I agree with Ruth, these are not antonyms.

A recruiter is a person whose job is to enlist or enrol people as employees, in the armed forces, or as members of an organisation.
A list of antonyms:-
There is no post with the job of expelling people from the armed forces or organisations, normally. However this job would be the antonym of 'recruiter' - something like "firer" - "person whose job is to get rid of unwanted employees".
If you look in the TFD page for 'recruiter' you will see that there is no one-word or short-phrase antonym of "recruiter".

*****************
"A recruit" is a person who has just joined the army or another organisation and not yet trained.
A list of antonyms: (someone who has been there a long time and is well-trained)
professional, expert, master, pro (informal), veteran, old hand, old-timer.

***********
The "-er" suffix is very common. It is active.
Teacher is someone who teaches - writer is someone who writes - employer is someone who employs someone.
______________

However, '-ee' is not so common - though new uses are being 'invented' and used. It is passive.

"Employee" - someone who is employed - is a common word.
"Hiree" - someone who has just been hired - is used occasionally (but 'recruit' is normal)

I have recently seen 'muggee' - someone who has been mugged (robbed in the street) and 'awardee' - someone who has received a reward.




Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
A cooperator
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 4:47:45 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/27/2011
Posts: 2,955
Neurons: 11,004
Location: Ḩāḑírah, Hadramawt, Yemen
Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Hi!

I understand what you mean. Your definitions are correct and they show two views of the same activity (recruiting) - but I agree with Ruth, these are not antonyms.

A recruiter is a person whose job is to enlist or enrol people as employees, in the armed forces, or as members of an organisation.
A list of antonyms:-
There is no post with the job of expelling people from the armed forces or organisations, normally. However this job would be the antonym of 'recruiter' - something like "firer" - "person whose job is to get rid of unwanted employees".
If you look in the TFD page for 'recruiter' you will see that there is no one-word or short-phrase antonym of "recruiter".

*****************
"A recruit" is a person who has just joined the army or another organisation and not yet trained.
A list of antonyms: (someone who has been there a long time and is well-trained)
professional, expert, master, pro (informal), veteran, old hand, old-timer.

***********
The "-er" suffix is very common. It is active.
Teacher is someone who teaches - writer is someone who writes - employer is someone who employs someone.
______________

However, '-ee' is not so common - though new uses are being 'invented' and used. It is passive.

"Employee" - someone who is employed - is a common word.
"Hiree" - someone who has just been hired - is used occasionally (but 'recruit' is normal)

I have recently seen 'muggee' - someone who has been mugged (robbed in the street) and 'awardee' - someone who has received a reward.


Thank you so much,
For 'Muggee' and 'awardee', even Google Translation didn't translate them to the equivalent in Arabic.

Whoever doesn't own what he promises to those who do not deserve must not promise it.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 11:38:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,664
Neurons: 182,069
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Yes.
There are many words in English which are made up from two elements.
The most common ones will be in a dictionary as single words.

However, the more uncommon ones, or ones recently coined, need to be looked up in parts.

"Awardee" is made up from the verb "award" and the suffix "-ee".

award vb (tr)
1. to give (something due), esp as a reward for merit: to award prizes.
2. (Law) law to declare to be entitled, as by decision of a court of law or an arbitrator

-ee
suffix forming nouns
1. indicating a person who is the recipient of an action (as opposed, esp in legal terminology, to the agent, indicated by -or or -er): assignee; grantee; lessee.
2. indicating a person in a specified state or condition: absentee; employee.

Collins Dictionary

It is similar for 'muggee'.

mug vb, mugs, mugging or mugged
5. (Law) (tr) informal to attack or rob (someone) violently


**************
In cases where there is an existing noun, this "-ee" suffix is not used ("recruit" not "recruitee")


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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