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D00M
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2018 4:54:00 PM

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Hello respected teachers,

What does "represent for" mean in the following? The context is about the social settings of 18-century England.

No attempt was made to regulate this shift from the old economic world to the new, since even liberal reformers were committed to the philosophy of laissez-faire. This theory of "let alone," set out in Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations in 1776, holds that the general welfare can be ensured only by the free operation of economic laws; the government should maintain a policy of strict noninterference and leave people to pursue, unfettered, their private interests. On the one hand, laissez-faire thinking might have helped pave the way for the long-postponed emancipation of the slave population of the West Indies; by 1833, when Parliament finally ended slavery, the anomaly that their unfree labor represented for the new economic and social orthodoxies evidently had become intolerable.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
sureshot
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 5:04:44 AM
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D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

What does "represent for" mean in the following? The context is about the social settings of 18-century England.

No attempt was made to regulate this shift from the old economic world to the new, since even liberal reformers were committed to the philosophy of laissez-faire. This theory of "let alone," set out in Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations in 1776, holds that the general welfare can be ensured only by the free operation of economic laws; the government should maintain a policy of strict noninterference and leave people to pursue, unfettered, their private interests. On the one hand, laissez-faire thinking might have helped pave the way for the long-postponed emancipation of the slave population of the West Indies; by 1833, when Parliament finally ended slavery, the anomaly that their unfree labor represented for the new economic and social orthodoxies evidently had become intolerable.

___________________________

Out of curiosity, I checked the source of the text and found that the extract is from "The Norton Anthology of English literature. Volume 2" whose General Editor is Stephen Greenblatt, COGAN UNIVERSITY PROFESSOR OF THE HUMANITIES, HARVARD UNIVERSITY. The authors include Jon Stallworthy;PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH LITERATURE, OXFORD UNIVERSITY; WILLIAM R. KENAN PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND OF HISTORY AND LITERATURE, HARVARD UNIVERSITY and James Simpson; PROFESSOR OF ENGLISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE, HARVARD UNIVERSITY.

The extract is:
"...their unfree labor represented for the new economic and social orthodoxies evidently had become intolerable"

The meaning is:
"... their unfree labour (= people employed against their will by threatening them in varied ways), which symbolised (=represented) the beliefs of the new economic and social orthodoxies, evidently had become intolerable".

The intended sense is:
The concept of "unfree labour" which was based on the philosophy of laissez-faire and the new economic and social theories or practices had become intolerable.










Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 9:23:08 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I disagree with sureshot's analysis very slightly (though it doesn't really change the understanding of what the sentence means). The sentence is a little awkward.

Quote:
". . . the anomaly that their unfree labor represented for the new economic and social orthodoxies evidently had become intolerable"


"that their unfree labour represented for the new economic and social orthodoxies" is a relative clause, defining the anomaly.
The unfree labour represented an anomaly for the new economic and social orthodoxies.
The anomaly had become intolerable.

The new economic and social orthodoxies found slavery to be an anomaly.
This was intolerable to them and that paved the way for Parliament's act which ended the practice of slavery.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
D00M
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 2:53:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,607
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Thank you very much both.

But why has the writer said "represented for" and not just "represented"?

Would you please give me some sentence in which "represent for" is used?

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
thar
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 4:09:12 PM

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Joined: 7/8/2010
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It is a clause, so you have to look at the subject and object and indirect object.

the anomaly that their unfree labor represented for the new economic and social orthodoxies evidently had become intolerable.

Their unfree labor represented an anomaly

For the new economic and social orthodoxies their unfree labor represented an anomaly.


That anomaly had become intolerable.

The 'for' makes in indirect. It is not the same as represents.
x represents y.
x represents y for z
y is the anomaly that x represents for z





D00M
Posted: Monday, October 8, 2018 4:21:51 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,607
Neurons: 7,645
I see.

Thanks for the detailed explanation, thar.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
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