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Canonicity Options
D00M
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 7:32:19 AM

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Hello respected teachers,

What do "canonicity" and "canonical" mean in the following?


Nowadays, although the six poets remain, by most measures of canonicity, the principal canonical figures, we recognise a greater range of accomplishments.



The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 7:59:44 AM

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"Canonicity" appears to be a made-up word.

Canon - literary works accepted as following exact rules (or something like that). It originally meant "the small selection of books and writings chosen because they didn't disagree with traditional beliefs, and accepted as being part of "the bible".

The adjective from 'canon' is canonical - acting or writing in the accepted way. I suppose "mainstream" or "traditional" would be a similar word for the extended use, I guess.

-icity as a suffix doesn't exist, but it looks like it should be formed from "canonicious", like this:
-acity - suffix forming a noun from adjectives ending '-acious' (tenacious - tenacity).

It is a noun, made up from a fictitious adjective and a fictitious suffix - based on a real noun "canon".
So it is FAR from a 'canonical' word - it follows invented rules.

I would (in this sentence) replace 'canonical' by 'acceptable', and "canonicity" by "acceptability".
However, this seems to weaken the idea a little.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
thar
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 8:09:36 AM

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If whoever is writing this ***** is the same person who wrote about a quixotic discipline - stop waffling and write English that communicates clearly. I will still respect you in the morning - I promise.

Really, it is big words for the sake of big words or because you haven't the skill to communicate without them.

If the writers they are studying had written such tripe they would never have been published - yet somehow academics expect to get away with it.
Romany
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 12:59:34 PM
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Drago -

In literature, "Canon" has a more narrow definition. It is the corpus of the greatest writers down through history. It used to begin with the Greeks but now that technology has booted us so much further, texts like Hammurabi's Code are included. These are the writers that Eng.Lit. students study.

But of course, it's too vast to study in one lifetime, and canonical works usually provide the major works we study in whatever branches/periods/movements we eventually choose to study.

If I get what this person is trying to say, it's that a particular group of poets will never make it into the Canon. - The assertion is conveyed that this is because the corpus isn't innovative, or up-to-date, or searching for facility with language...whatever form it takes.

No matter how avant guarde, or unconventional, or outside mainstream a writer is, if they know what they are doing with words their work won't be disregarded. The only way people's works won't live on in the canon is if they aren't good enough.

So the guy is, as you say, a pretentious twit. One who is also unfamilar, in any but a nodding sort of way, with literature or the canon itself.

D00M
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 5:28:39 PM

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Thank you very much all.

I found the text in "The Norton Anthology of English Literature," 8th edition volume 2.

I should have said that earlier I feel. Anxious

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
sureshot
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 2:42:55 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Canonicity" appears to be a made-up word.


_______________

The given sentence is:

Nowadays, although the six poets remain, by most measures of canonicity, the principal canonical figures, we recognise a greater range of accomplishments.

MEANINGS:

The noun "canonicity" is mentioned in Oxford Dictionary
refer https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/canonicity)
It means "the fact or status of being canonical"

Similarly, the adjective "canonical" is also mentioned in Oxford Dictionary
(refer https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/canonical)

The adjective "canonical" means:

2.1 Accepted as being accurate and authoritative.
‘the canonical method of comparative linguistics’
SYNONYMS: recognized, authoritative, authorized, accepted, sanctioned, approved, received, established, orthodox

2.2 (of a writer or work) belonging to the literary canon.
canonical writers like Jane Austen’

In the given sentence "canonical" means "authoritative"

The given sentence is also mentioned in
"The Romantic Period" (First Reading), Page 1363.
Refer www.eacfaculty.org/pchidester/eng222files/Romantic%20Period.pdf


I find that Corpus of Contemporary American English mentions 1362 example sentences using "canonical" and 29 sentence examples using the noun "canonicity". I also find that the British National Corpus (BYU-BNC) mentions sentence examples with both these words.There are 183 example sentences using the adjective "canonical". However, the British National Corpus mentions just 1 sentence using the noun "canonicity".











Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 3:25:02 AM

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Well then.

If there is ONE single example of "canonicity" in the whole BNC, then my comment
Quote:
' "Canonicity" appears to be a made-up word'
is correct. ONE writer made it up and used it.

If there are 29 examples of it in the whole American corpus, we can assume that a couple of other writers from University of Arizona copied it.
Possibly the twenty examples found by the Oxford Dictionary are among the twenty-nine.

Yes - 'canonical' is a normal word.
As I said:The adjective from 'canon' is 'canonical'

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
sureshot
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 3:36:57 AM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Well then.

If there is ONE single example of "canonicity" in the whole BNC, then my comment
Quote:
' "Canonicity" appears to be a made-up word'
is correct. ONE writer made it up and used it.

If there are 29 examples of it in the whole American corpus, we can assume that a couple of other writers from University of Arizona copied it.
Possibly the twenty examples found by the Oxford Dictionary are among the twenty-nine.

Yes - 'canonical' is a normal word.
As I said:The adjective from 'canon' is 'canonical'

___________________________________________

I have no intention of debating the frequency or choice of words by a variety of writers. However,I reiterate that the example sentences are from different writers and in distinctive contexts.I have gone through the sentences and find no reason to suspect the two words.

The fact that Oxford Dictionary mentions the noun form "Canonicity" implies that the word is not made up. Words are not included in a dictionary based on a solitary use. A word is included in Oxford Dictionary only after it gains general acceptance.
thar
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 3:56:28 AM

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Well, all words are made up! It is just how many people use a particular word. The main problem here is that the writer has no need to use that word, and it adds no useful meaning.

How many other people have done the same thing, in attempting to express themselves... that might put it in the dictionary. But a word used lots of times with no meaning is still not a useful word. It just means lots of academics show the same lack of imagination.

I mean, look at the examples. I looked through the first 10 or so before I gave up. 2 or 3 made sense in the sentence.

But really:

Quote:
‘In the broader circles of art historical discussion today the discursive covers of predetermined canonicity and aesthetic grandeur no longer have the cachet they once did, hence their ideological usefulness has partly dissipated.’


arse up own its.
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 5:03:38 AM
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Slightly off-topic, but not totally irrelevant in a language forum is the use of canonical (but not, as far as I know, canonicity) by some grammarians for basic constructions. Huddleston and Pullum (2002.46), for example discuss five major dimensions of contrast between canonical and non-canonical clauses:

positive - negative
declarative - interrogative
active - passive
main -subordinate
non-coordinate - coordinate

Fans of some series of book and film series distinguish between canonical ones, which stick with the characters/characterisations, story-lines, etc, of the original versions, and non-canonical ones, which do not:

Many fans of the Lonesome Dove series and novels do not consider Return to Lonesome Dove nor the two derivative TV series to be canonical because of their divergence from McMurtry's storyline, and the apparent motivation of its production by the success of the original miniseries.

https://www.revolvy.com/page/Return-to-Lonesome-Dove


In this use of canon(ical), I noticed that canonicity is used in this article.
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 6:56:53 AM

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D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,
What do "canonicity" and "canonical" mean in the following?

D00M, you should respect the forum rules and choose the appropriate forum section to post your queries.

Your question has nothing to do with grammar, so it should go in the English Vocabulary section. Try to be more carefull.

D00M
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 7:05:29 AM

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Helenej wrote:
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,
What do "canonicity" and "canonical" mean in the following?

D00M, you should respect the forum rules and choose the appropriate forum section to post your queries.

Your question has nothing to do with grammar, so it should go in the English Vocabulary section. Try to be more carefull.



You are not in a position of authority to command people what to do, crazed psycho.

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 7:17:40 AM

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D00M wrote:
You are not in a position of authority to command people what to do, crazed psycho.

I am not commanding. I am recommending. And I highly recommend you to review the modal verb ‘should’ in your textbook.

***********

And why do you feel pissed off again? I only reminded you about the forum rules. You are definitely a hair trigger.
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 7:45:02 AM

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D00M, you probably need to listen to some music to feel better.
How about this song? I hope you will like it, especially the lyrics.

Every breath you take
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 7:47:17 AM

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should vb
(Grammar) the past tense of shall: used as an auxiliary verb to indicate that an action is considered by the speaker to be obligatory (you should go) or to form the subjunctive mood with I or we (I should like to see you; if I should be late, go without me).

Usage: 'Should' has, as its most common meaning in modern English, the sense 'ought' as in "I should go to the graduation, but I don't see how I can." However, the older sense of the subjunctive of 'shall' is often used with I or we to indicate a more polite form than would: 'I should like to go, but I can't.'
In much speech and writing, 'should' has been replaced by 'would' in contexts of this kind, but it remains in formal English when a conditional subjunctive is used: Should he choose to remain, he would be granted asylum.


Hi Helenj.
The reason that your 'suggestions' seem like demands is that they are worded as demands.

They are worded as if (as the dictionary says in the quote above) the speaker (you) consider the action obligatory.

"You should do this. You should do that" - these are demands, not suggestions.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 7:54:18 AM

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How about keeping it simple, Drag0?

Should – “used to say or ask what is the correct or best thing to do.”

Cambridge Dictionary

I see no reason for D00M to feel pissed off if someone tells him what the correct or best thing to do is.




Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 8:55:37 AM

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That is simple - "should" is used to show what YOU (the speaker) feel to be obligatory - that's a demand.
"should" - with 'I' or 'we' is used as a subjunctive to make polite recommendations.

Quote:
I am not commanding. I am recommending.

This may have been your intention, but it is not true of the sentences you typed. They are commands - not recommendations.

Your tone (in the way you use words) is sometimes demanding, impolite, sarcastic, confrontational, didactic and - yes - it annoys people.
I'm sure that most of the time you don't mean to be that way but that is what is communicated.

***********
You are right - it would have been better to put this query in the 'vocabulary' section.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 3:53:50 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
"Should" is used to show what YOU (the speaker) feel to be obligatory - that's a demand.

This is sheer allegation. Yes, I consider respecting the forum rules obligatory. But being of this opinion, I can ask, beg, request, recommend, tell, instruct, demand or command someone to respect them. “You should respect the rules” is not equal to “Respect the rules!”, which is obviously a command.

Anyway, the Collins Dictionary says, “You use should when you are saying what would be the right thing to do”.

What I said to D00M is ""Placing your query in the Vocabulary Section would be the right thing to do." No commanding at all. It was a recommendation.


Drag0nspeaker wrote:
Your tone (in the way you use words) is sometimes demanding, impolite, sarcastic, confrontational, didactic and - yes - it annoys people.
I'm sure that most of the time you don't mean to be that way but that is what is communicated.

If they want to be impolite and arrogant to me, they will have to live with their annoyance for many years to come.

D00M
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 4:26:00 PM

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Quote:
If they want to be impolite and arrogant to me, they will have to live with their annoyance for many years to comee.



Who was arrogant to you before feeling authoritative and posting in my thread? The problem is that you are still burning inside. Boo hoo!

Definitely you deserve no respect.
Dancing

I've seen so many annoying flies for the years passed; welcome to their company. Try hard for the years to come, Buzzzz. Applause

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 4:06:33 PM

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@sureshot Well done Applause your style reminds me of mine :P

The moment I saw 'canonicity' instantly I recognized it as the English counterpart of our 'каноничност', indeed, I looked it up for you:
https://rechnik.chitanka.info/w/%D0%BA%D0%B0%D0%BD%D0%BE%D0%BD%D0%B8%D1%87%D0%BD%D0%BE%D1%81%D1%82

This word is not only OED "sanctioned", not that Oxford is the final word/instance, but very well used in Bulgarian language.

>-icity as a suffix doesn't exist, but it looks like it should be formed from "canonicious", like this:

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-icity
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/e/icity

It confuses me how so many native speakers react to some "unofficial" words and phrases, the negativism, I mean.

In Orthodox[al] Christianity, words as 'canon' and 'icon' are of greatEST value, is one of my favorite dictionaries - Heritage - done by pretentious twits?

https://www.thefreedictionary.com/iconicity

Are the staff at CED (Collins English Dictionary) twits also:
https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Vulcanicity

Вулканичност, won't go there how beautiful usage cases it has.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
BobShilling
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 5:06:33 PM
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sureshot wrote:
I have gone through the sentences and find no reason to suspect the two words.


I have just gone through the 29 examples in COCA. The situation is not quite as dire as Drag0 suggested, but he wasn't far off.

The first thirteen are all from one paper.
Numbers 15-19 are all from one paper.

That means that 18 of the 29 examples are from just two academic papers.

Numbers 25 and 26 are both from one paper.
Numbers 151, 25, 26, 29 were all published in volumes of one journal.
Numbers 20 and 21 were both published in volumes of one journal.

So the 29 examples are from 12 (groups of) writers in papers published in 9 academic journals.
thar
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 5:27:29 PM

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There are a couple of points here. First is that the dictionary is purely descriptive. It describes the words people use - from canonicity to OMG to irregardless. Entry into the dictionary is a acknowledgement of existence, not a seal of approval. There is no 'Académie' in English. No folks to say you ain't doin' it right.

The problem is not with it being a made-up word. All words are made up, and they add meaning and beauty to a language. But you have to look at how they are used. There is nothing wrong with the word if it is used to express something, gives meaning within the sentence.

But that relies on writers expressing themselves with it. Bollocks with big words is still just bollocks.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 5:31:35 PM

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Let's look up the ‘Schizandrafield‘ Corpus for *_canon*, the corpora being:



Corpus Tag, Name

AHD, American_Heritage_Dictionary_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl
BNC, Machine-Learning_British-National-Corpus_XML-edition.tar
BRE, Britannica_Encyclopedia_2010_1.563_miled_(En-En)_ANSI.dsl
CAL, Cambridge_Advanced_Learner's_Dictionary_4th_Ed_(En-En).dsl
CCA, Collins_COBUILD_Advanced_Learner's_English_Dictionary_(5th_ed)_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl
DMC, DeepMind_Q_and_A_Dataset_cnn_downloads_(92579_files).tar
DMD, DeepMind_Q_and_A_Dataset_dailymail_downloads_(219506_files).tar
EDR, encyclopediadramaticase-20150628-current.tar
EJD, Encyclopaedia_Judaica_(in_22_volumes)_TXT.tar
EJN, ENAMDICT_Japanese_names
FDU, For_Dummies_978-ebooks_Collection.tar
GGB, Google_Books_corpus_version_20130501_English_All_Nodes.txt
HCN, Hacker_News_2006_to_2017-jul.json
IST, INTERNET_SACRED_TEXT_ARCHIVE_DVD-ROM_9_(English_140479_htm_files).tar
LDC, Longman_Dictionary_of_Contemporary_English_5th_Ed_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl
MCD, Macmillan_English_Dictionary_(En-En)_.dsl
MCT, Macmillan_English_Thesaurus_(En-En).dsl
NSO, New_Shorter_Oxford_English_Dictionary_fifth_edition.tar
OED, Oxford_English_Dictionary_2nd_Edition_Version_4_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS.dsl.txt
OSH, OSHO.TXT
PGT, Project_Gutenberg_DVD-2010_(29180_files).tar
RDD, Reddit_Comments_(JSON_objects)_from_(2005-12_to_2018-01).json
RHW, Random_House_Webster's_Unabridged_Dictionary_(En-En)_.dsl
SNT, Machine-Learning_WestburyLab.NonRedundant.UsenetCorpus_(47860_English_language_non-binary-file_news_groups).tar
STX, archive.org_stackexchange_(346_corpora_2017-Oct-12).tar
TAL, the-anarchist-library-2016-01-18-en_html.tar
TXF, TEXTFILES.COM_(58096_files).tar
URB, Machine-Learning_Urban_Dictionary_Definitions_Corpus_(1999_-_May-2016).words.json
WKD, dumps.wikimedia.org_Germany_dewiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WKE, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WKF, dumps.wikimedia.org_France_frwiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WKI, dumps.wikimedia.org_Italy_itwiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WKN, dumps.wikimedia.org_Netherlands_nlwiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WKP, dumps.wikimedia.org_Portugal_ptwiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WKS, dumps.wikimedia.org_Spain_eswiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMB, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwikibooks-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMN, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwikinews-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMP, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_specieswiki-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMQ, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwikiquote-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMS, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwikisource-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMU, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwikiversity-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMV, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwikivoyage-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WMW, dumps.wikimedia.org_English_enwiktionary-20180220-pages-articles.xml
WUD, Webster's_Unabridged_3_(En-En)_WHOLEWORDS_ANSI.dsl

Widespread it is, 27 out of 44 corpora house it, among them - American_Heritage_Dictionary, the-anarchist-library, Webster's_Unabridged_3, Britannica_Encyclopedia_2010, Encyclopaedia_Judaica, Random_House_Webster, British-National-Corpus, Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Google_Books_corpus, Project_Gutenberg_DVD-2010, Hacker_News, New_Shorter_Oxford_English_Dictionary and Oxford_English_Dictionary:

[*_canon*] AHD_0,000,002_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] TAL_0,000,001_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WUD_0,000,002_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] TXF_0,000,019_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKE_0,000,438_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] BRE_0,000,009_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] RDD_0,007,923_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] EJD_0,000,013_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKS_0,000,011_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] GGB_0,000,050_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKP_0,000,014_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] RHW_0,000,001_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] SNT_0,000,352_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] HCN_0,000,017_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] NSO_0,000,001_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] BNC_0,000,002_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] PGT_0,000,115_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] OED_0,000,006_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] URB_0,000,001_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] IST_0,000,062_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WMW_0,000,013_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WMS_0,000,228_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WMQ_0,000,014_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WMB_0,000,002_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKD_0,000,011_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKF_0,000,010_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKI_0,000,004_canonicity /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/

OED has it 6 times while those Wikipedia guys 438, how pretentious, hee-hee.

As for the plural, Google_Books_corpus, Stack Exchange, Wiktionary and Reddit_Comments house it:

[*_canon*] STX_0,000,019_canonicities /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] RDD_0,000,008_canonicities /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WMW_0,000,002_canonicities /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] GGB_0,000,002_canonicities /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/

And another rare noun is spotted in Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Google_Books_corpus, Project_Gutenberg_DVD-2010, Hacker_News, New_Shorter_Oxford_English_Dictionary and Oxford_English_Dictionary:

[*_canon*] TXF_0,000,004_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] STX_0,000,023_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] RDD_0,000,020_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WMW_0,000,002_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] WKE_0,000,004_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] GGB_0,000,010_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] PGT_0,000,001_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] HCN_0,000,001_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] NSO_0,000,001_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/
[*_canon*] OED_0,000,007_canonicalness /Schizandrafield_Corpus_revision_C_(44-corpora_788068084_distinct-words).sorted/


Bah, some twit(s) decided to include it into OED's little brother.

For those who want themselves to see such rather rare words, how they appear across 44 corpora:
http://forum.thefreedictionary.com/postsm1032517_MASAKARI--The-people-s-choice--General-Purpose-Grade--English-wordlist.aspx#1032517

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
Sanmayce
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 7:34:25 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 380
Neurons: 24,205
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
178,000 results

You all forgot to look up the baddest boy out there for canonicity:

Just a few hits:

The Politics of Canonicity: Lines of Resistance in Modernist Hebrew Poetry
Michael Gluzman
Stanford University Press, Dec 30, 2002 - Literary Criticism - 272 pages
"The Politics of Canonicity sheds new light on the dynamics of canon formation in modern Hebrew literature."

Persian Authorship and Canonicity in Late Mughal Delhi: Building an Ark
Prashant Keshavmurthy
Routledge, Jan 29, 2016 - Literary Criticism - 178 pages
"Writing in the eighteenth century, the Persian-language litterateurs of late Mughal Delhi were aware that they could no longer take for granted the relations of Persian with Islamic imperial power, relations that had enabled Persian literary life to flourish in India since the tenth century C.E."

Antonyms in English: Construals, Constructions and Canonicity
Steven Jones, M. Lynne Murphy, Carita Paradis, Caroline Willners
Cambridge University Press, Feb 23, 2012 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 170 pages
"The study of antonyms (or 'opposites') in a language can provide important insight into word meaning and discourse structures. This book provides an extensive investigation of antonyms in English ..."

Canon and Canonicity: The Formation and Use of Scripture
Einar Thomassen
Museum Tusculanum Press, 2010 - Religion - 232 pages
"The authority of the Bible is one of the defining features of Christianity. However, the origins of the Biblical canon, both as an idea and as a composition still pose many unresolved questions ..."

Marginality, Canonicity, Passion
Marco Formisano, Christina Shuttleworth Kraus
Oxford University Press, Jun 21, 2018 - Literary Criticism - 416 pages
"In recent years, the discipline of Classics has been experiencing a profound transformation affecting not only its methodologies and hermeneutic practices - how classicists read and interpret ancient literature ..."

These guys at Stanford, Routledge, Cambridge and Oxford must also be pretentious twits, especially the last one, 4 occurrences of 'canonicity' in one page, here. 4 more in previous 2 pages.

And the OED entry:

canonicity
(kænəˈnɪsɪtɪ)
[f. on type of a L. *canonicitas, f. canonic-us, or ad. F. canonicité: see -ity.]
Canonicalness, canonical status, esp. the fact of being comprehended in the Canon of Scripture, or in any other sacred canon.
1797 Monthly Rev. XXIII. 485 To attribute canonicity to all those Scriptures of the Jews.    
1841 Myers Cath. Th. xix. 73 If none but a literal line and measure of Canonicity will be accepted.    
1849 W. Fitzgerald tr. Whitaker's Disput. 46 Would Augustine, if he held all the books to have an equal right to canonicity‥have preferred some to others?


He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
sureshot
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2018 2:20:16 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,023
Neurons: 379,418
Thank you Sanmayce for enlightening me on the variety of sources.

I would only like to add that the sentence using the two words is a part of the larger text in the book. On reading the paragraphs in detail, I find no reason to change my views. In the given context, the two words convey the desired sense.

I have no intention of becoming of becoming a critic on the choice of words by a variety of authors. To me, flexibility and acceptance of words is the key to understand the richness of the language. It makes the language more interesting.

After all, even in one country, everyone does not use a given word in one way. Different folks, different styles - and I for one cannot sit in judgement over the choice of words by other authors. Different writers have created words from time to time and many have given them different interpretations that are not accepted by some amongst them.
Sanmayce
Posted: Sunday, October 7, 2018 3:29:07 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 5/29/2012
Posts: 380
Neurons: 24,205
Location: Sofia, Sofia-Capital, Bulgaria
It is nice to have such balanced and appreciative the diversity styles as yours sureshot, way to go.
Also, forgot to check the graphs for the Google Books out:
https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=canonicity&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Ccanonicity%3B%2Cc0

I myself see the ocean of words/phrases/sentences as an untamed phenomenon as bonanza and extravaganza - an entity mirroring the Logos, all electronic texts being a vast ocean to sail onto or dive into. As for sailing into, no problema also, as long the appreciativeness is alive.

Earlier this year while diving into suffix abysmal depths, found the etymology of this beauty expecting to see 'richness' as its root only to find that it guided me back to the wise saying "The journey, not the goal, matters really":
Etymology
From Spanish bonanza (“calm sea, fair weather, good luck, rich lode”), from Medieval Latin bonacia (“fair weather”), a blend of bonus (“good”) +‎ malacia (“calm sea”).


In a sentence, my passion is to hold fast to authenticity and sail far and dive deep appreciating the vista.

He learns not to learn and reverts to what all men pass by.
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