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D00M
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 2:45:48 PM

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Hello respected teachers,

What does "1jf" represent in the following?

Compuvision Ltd
Warwick House
Warwick Street
Forest Hill
London SE23 1JF
UK

The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 3:43:18 PM

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Location: Luton, England, United Kingdom
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

What does "1jf" represent in the following?

Compuvision Ltd
Warwick House
Warwick Street
Forest Hill
London SE23 1JF
UK


It refers to the particular part of the SE23 region of London Warwick House is.
This is a map of the Postcode ( it's one word not two) regions of London.


The SE23 region is quite a large part of South East London, 1JF further narrows down which street or streets the postcode refers to.

Edit: I don't know where you have got this address from but SE23 1JF does not exist, please be careful if it's a company asking you for money in anyway,

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
thar
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 4:06:24 PM

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As I am sure you have worked out, the first part is geographical. Other cities in the UK have an identifier from the city name (eg G - Glasgow, M - Manchester, NE - Newcastle, L - Liverpool. - or town name or area name: TW - Twickenham, RM - Romford
Solely for London, there is no 'London' identifier, just the parts of the city, because it so much larger than any other UK city. So the first part is the area of London - North, South-East, West-Central, East, etc.

(there is no S because that is Sheffield, and no NE because that is Newcastle)

The numbers in each area start low towards the centre but then go to alphabetical order so they appear a bit more random.
So SE23 will be South-East London, but quite a way out from the centre.

The second part is just code. It has no special meaning apart from being a unique identifier. Locations close to each other have a similar number, and the final part of two letters narrows it down to the part of the street - maybe down to three or four houses, depending on where it is.
It means the automatic sorting machines can sort everything to a local level before anyone has to sort them into 'walks' - the routes taken by the postal delivery workers.
D00M
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 5:19:43 PM

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Thank you very much both, very informative.



The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Helenej
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 5:34:32 PM

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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
D00M, instead of bothering the respected teachers with your numerous questions at that very moment they pop into your head, you first should try to type whatever you want to find out in the search engine bar on your computer, especially since your question isn’t related to English language in any way. Had you done it this time, you would have immediately found out that the number after the space in the postcode denotes the postcode sector and the two following letters denote the postcode unit.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postcodes_in_the_United_Kingdom

Hope123
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 8:10:34 PM

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Hi DOOM.

Canada has a similar system except the first letter does not denote the city as Thar mentioned.

Typing Canad's postal code would be the same for the UK - a pain in the neck. It goes from letter to numeral to letter to numeral.



Elitism is the slur directed at merit by mediocrity. -Sydney J. Harris, journalist (14 Sep 1917-1986)
Helenej
Posted: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 11:46:03 PM

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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
Hope123 wrote:
Hi DOOM.

Canada has a similar system except the first letter does not denote the city as Thar mentioned.

Typing Canad's postal code would be the same for the UK - a pain in the neck. It goes from letter to numeral to letter to numeral.

Hi DOOM.

Were you to feel like learning more about postal codes in Canada, you should also type respective words in the search bar on your computer. The first link you are going to see is


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postal_codes_in_Canada

thar
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 2:19:32 AM

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A combination of letters and numbers is effective because for one it is quite easy to remember, and for two, even if you don't use all the letters, you still have a much larger number of combinations.
eg two digits only have 99 combinations but two letters have at least 400.

In Iceland there is a 3 digit number, by area.
Of course, sometimes you have to use some initiative. Especially when someone writes a letter without knowing the address.

I have experienced quite a lot of these. One I know of was sent a few years ago from Canada and poorly addressed to:

Dr [name spelt incorrectly]
name of tiny village/hamlet
France

and correctly got to its intended target in England. Applause

This is one the Iceland postal service delivered, and recipient posted about it. But this is actually very effectively addressed, with all the information you need!




Postal delivery in Iceland was always quite a heroic endeavour -
Quote:
Many Icelandic postmen suffered constant hardship and the risk of accident or death on their travels. In fact records show that between 1792 and 1939, Iceland lost a total of nineteen people during postal trips across the country. Of those, fourteen were postmen, many of them drowning during river crossings, dying from exposure during snowstorms, or on rarer occasions falling to their deaths down crevices of ice or rocky mountain ledges.


Quote:
This accident was known as póstslysið mikla (the Great Postal Accident). It is a reminder of the constant risk our postal ancestors took in service of Iceland in their duty of delivering the country´s correspondence. This accident occurred in the autumn of 1927, on the 7th of September. Þorlákur Þorláksson was the postman. He worked the Suðurlands (Southland) postal route from 1923 to 1933 which covered the area from Prestbakka at Síðu to Hornafjörður. On this fateful day Þorlákur lost four horses and a man that was travelling with him while they were crossing the glacier at Breiðamerkursandi.

It was usual for Þorlákur to cross this glacier on his postal route and it had taken him only three hours the day before to cross it. Care had to be taken when crossing this area as the conditions up there could change daily with the melting ice and movement in the glacier. On this particular journey it so happened that the travellers had gone a distance of about twenty fathoms up the glacier when they (including the postman) had to stop and work to clear a safe path for the horses. .... for no sooner had they moved to the area where Þorlákur was clearing a path that the Glacier cracked directly beneath the horses feet. All the horses fell with the cracked ice, seven in total, along with Jón Pálsson who had been guarding them.
They were able to rescue three of the horses after much effort. In some areas where Jón and the horses fell there was running water. They searched into the night but fruitlessly. Þorlákur had to continue his journey to Prestbakka with news of the accident and report the missing traveller and mail boxes. The search for Jón Pálsson and the missing mail continued to no avail.
The following spring Björn Pálsson, the brother of the deceased school teacher, was searching the area of the glacier in hopes of finding something when he saw the head of one of the horses that carried the mail, stuck in the ice. He went home and sent for men and tools to dig up the horses. At last, the glacier had returned what it had stolen and the body of Jón Pálsson was found along with six small post boxes, wet and half crushed from the glacier.


Yeah, it is true - not a lot happens in Iceland. Whistle
BobShilling
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 2:51:34 AM
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As an experiment, I once sent postcards from four different towns in Germany. I addressed them to:

1. Mrs Shilling, XXXXstoke, England. (XXXXstoke is the name of a small village with about 250 inhabitants.)
2. Mrs Shilling, GB - XY14 4YZ.
3. Mrs Shilling, 7 YYYY Cottages, XXXXStoke, Hampshire, England.
4. Mrs Shilling, 7 YYYY Cottages, XXXXstoke, XY14 4YZ, England.

All four took the same amount of time to arrive.

Hope123
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 7:15:12 AM

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DOOM, I don't know what other countries call it, but in Canada it is postal code, and in the States it is called a zip code.

Elitism is the slur directed at merit by mediocrity. -Sydney J. Harris, journalist (14 Sep 1917-1986)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 7:18:45 AM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Officially - I don't know how true it is (I guess it's OK because many companies accept a credit card payment with only this data) but all you need to show a totally unique address in the UK is the identification number or house name and the postcode. (EH is 'Edinburgh', but it covers an area much larger than just the city).

In cities, a unique address would be something like
"42
EH53-0LC
UK"


The Postal service could recognise that as
42 Esk Drive,
Craigsfarm Village,
Livingston,
West Lothian,
Scotland,
EH53-0LC
UK.


If it's a block of flats ('apartment building'), the first number would be complex - something like 22/45, meaning "Flat 22 in building 45".

In the countryside, some buildings are not numbered, so an address like:
Tulley's Farm,
Fife Road,
near Clovenstone Village,
Perthshire,
Scotland,
PH22-5QZ
UK.


could be written as "Tulley's Farm - - PH22-5QZ" and be recognised by a sorting machine.

**********
22/45 is the "officially accepted" format used by the register of unique addresses (which is used to ensure that no two dwellings or offices share an identical address).

Some people write "45F22" - "building 45, Flat 22" - which is Ok for the postman (the format is pretty obvious), but doesn't work for automatic sorting-machines.

If 45/22 and 22/45 (with the same postcode) were on two different delivery routes (different ends of a long road, for example), a letter addressed to 45F22 might be delivered to 45/22.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
ozok
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 8:14:03 AM
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In the Netherlands the postcode is quite efficient. It has the form of 1234AB where the numerals indicate the area and the letters the street. This code never covers more than 100 houses – and all on the same side of the street.

For private mail, just by adding the house number (and if appropriate, an apartment number) the letter or parcel will arrive as expected without mention any name or street.

1234AB/35C

is sufficient to write on the envelope even without the recipient’s name, street or town. In this example 35 is the house number and 'C' is the apartment ‘number’.

This sort of construction is quite commonly used by senders who write the return address on the back of the envelope - it provides some privacy.

If sent from abroad, just add ‘Holland’.

Having written all this, in practice ‘snail' mail is losing out to other types of correspondence, post offices are disappearing and the price of postage stamps is outrageous.

But postcodes are easily added to your GPS navigator.




just sayin'
Hope123
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 10:22:32 AM

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Hi Ozok and Drago.

I think that all Canada Post needs is the postal code, except if you are in an apartment they need the number to put it into the right box. They don't have a list of names. Sometimes a piece of mail with the unit number missing will just be left in the mail room. People will see it and pick it up.

So the postal code is efficient. We followed the UK in design. When I said our code was a pain it was because I heard my husband complain when he was in business that you have to do capitals and numbers switching back and forth even on a regular keyboard - and now on the iPad there are three keyboards. But of course now companies have a lot better way of doing large mails with pre made tags etc.

Canada Post has put mailboxes into communities so they don't get door to door. People complained. I think they left the boxes there but do home delivery in new areas. I think. Politics. Prices aren't that bad when you consider what shipping charges can be from internet buys.


Anyhow, Canada Post while trying to stay viable, now does deliveries of small parcels for delivery companies.

I'll have to see if there's a spot to add the code to the GPS next time we need the map. You learn something new on this forum every day!

Interesting thread.


Elitism is the slur directed at merit by mediocrity. -Sydney J. Harris, journalist (14 Sep 1917-1986)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 1:08:15 PM

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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi!
For me, a postcode is not a problem - just hit "Caps Lock" with my little finger, then type the whole postcode (including the hyphen) and hit "Caps Lock" again. I think that's standard on normal keyboards.

I know i-pads are awful - go into capital mode, type a letter, come out of capital mode, go into number mode, type a number, come out of number mode, go into capital mode, type a letter.

i cld ustand the type of person who doesnt bother with capitals and punctation

Almost the only 'mail' I receive is spam - I get a bank statement every three months, even though I opted for 'electronic banking' and have a daily statement online, that's about it.

At 60P for an ordinary-sized letter, it's not worth it.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 1:34:50 PM
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Down here all that's needed is one's name and postcode for anyone to find your full address. Taxis, deliveries, service providers, companies...and friends coming to visit for the first time just need that.

So much better than spelling out every word and repeating "No, Number 16, not Number 60." down the phone!
RuthP
Posted: Thursday, October 4, 2018 3:12:22 PM

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In the US, it is actually a ZIP code (though most Americans probably don't know that). "ZIP" stands for Zone Improvement Plan. The original ZIP codes were five-digit numbers. That is still what most people use. The entire ZIP code is now a ZIP plus four: the original five digit code, which specified the zone, and a subsequent four digits, which specifies the exact address. In theory, all you would need would be the ZIP plus four to get a letter anywhere. In fact, since the postal carrier is a human being, one is supposed to write the address for them to read.

To go with Thar's story, however, I have one of my own.

In high school, I had a friend who was a couple of years younger than I. He was the age of my next younger sibling, and good friends with my youngest brother; they both raced bicycles, which was extremely uncommon then. He had various family problems, and actually, while I was away at college, he came and lived with at my family's house. He dropped out of high school without finishing. (He's very bright; it was boring; he eventually got an advanced degree and taught engineering.) Well, this was the late 1960s, the height of the Vietnam War, and you did not stick around if you did not wish to be drafted.

He went to live with his grandmother, who was English and lived in, I believe England, certainly Great Britain. (She whipped him into shape and got him back into school.) He wanted to write to my family once he was in England, but (typical for a geek) he had no idea what the address was. He addressed the letter as follows, and it got there no problem:

The (family name) family
The big house at the top of the hill under the pine trees on (street name)
(town name), (state name)
USA

Ever since, I've had a very good opinion of the lengths to which the postal service will go to try to deliver mail. It was the trees that did it. Yes, the house was good size, but the pine and fir trees in the front yard were huge, with branches that reached across not only the sidewalk, but also more than half way across the wide street in front of the house.
D00M
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 4:39:08 PM

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Helenej wrote:
D00M, instead of bothering the respected teachers with your numerous questions at that very moment they pop into your head, you first should try to type whatever you want to find out in the search engine bar on your computer, especially since your question isn’t related to English language in any way.


If the "respected teachers" tell me so, I will do that. From another thread I realized that your words are misleading, even when they give you "five respectable grammar books".

Now you give me a "Wikipedia" link?

Funny.


Whistle Whistle Whistle




The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 5:16:27 PM

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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
D00M wrote:
If the "respected teachers" tell me so, I will do that.

OK. Yet I think it is obvious for any reasonable person that one should first try to search the Internet before asking a question the answer to which can be found in two clicks.

D00M wrote:
From another thread I realized that your words are misleading.

It only seems to you. My words are the ultimate truth.Angel

D00M wrote:
Now you give me a "Wikipedia" link?

That’s right. I taught you how to use Google search and gave you the link you were unable to find. Anything wrong with the link?

D00M
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 5:43:56 PM

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Helenej wrote:
My words are the ultimate truth.



Most ignorant people I know say the same thing.

Whistle





The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Helenej
Posted: Friday, October 5, 2018 5:55:52 PM

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Joined: 9/24/2013
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Location: Kiev, Kyiv City, Ukraine
D00M wrote:
Helenej wrote:
My words are the ultimate truth.

Most ignorant people I know say the same thing.

Try to read harder and you will see that my words are the ultimate truth.Angel
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, October 6, 2018 1:32:18 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 30,140
Neurons: 176,780
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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