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So your condition vs so that your condition Options
Jigneshbharati
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2018 12:45:47 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 11/3/2016
Posts: 1,885
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You may not need any treatment during the early stages of Parkinson's disease as symptoms are usually mild. However, you may need regular appointments with your specialist so your condition can be monitored.
Treatment
Please explain the grammatical form and function of "so" in " so your condition can be monitored.
If we replace "so" with "so that", would that sentence be still grammatically correct without the change in meaning?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2018 1:10:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
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Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi - yes you could add a 'that' without changing the meaning of the sentence.

Usage Note: Many critics and grammarians have insisted that 'so' must be followed by 'that' in formal writing when used to introduce a clause giving the reason for or purpose of an action: He stayed so that he could see the second feature. But since many respected writers use 'so' for 'so that' in formal writing, it seems best to consider the issue one of stylistic preference: The store stays open late so (or so that) people who work all day can buy groceries.

It is a conjunction with the meaning "with the purpose that" or "in order that".

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
sureshot
Posted: Monday, October 1, 2018 1:16:03 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,022
Neurons: 379,073
Jigneshbharati wrote:
You may not need any treatment during the early stages of Parkinson's disease as symptoms are usually mild. However, you may need regular appointments with your specialist so your condition can be monitored.
Treatment
Please explain the grammatical form and function of "so" in " so your condition can be monitored.
If we replace "so" with "so that", would that sentence be still grammatically correct without the change in meaning?

_______________

In the given sentence "so" is a conjunction. You can also use "so that" without change in meaning. The sentence will continue to be grammatically correct. Here, "so (that)" means "in order to make something happen, make something possible etc".
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