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embarrass, three topics Options
onsen
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2018 12:53:32 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/14/2017
Posts: 257
Neurons: 4,961
Hello,

Quote:
A. Are you trying to embarrass me?
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

B. You didn’t embarrass me in the slightest.
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

C. I hope I didn’t embarrass you in front of your friends.
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English .



Though the definition of the verb 'embarrss' is not difficult, it is difficult to understand sentences with it in them as regards in what situations the sentences are used from whom to whom.
embarrass .

Below are conversations made with the sentences A, B and C. I name them Conversation A, B and C, respectively.

Conversation A.
Mother: Dyeing your hair red, painting your fingernails blue, what do you think you’re going to be when you’re still merely a shoolgirl?
Daughter: Is it wrong to do that? Other mates do that.
M: Are you trying to embarrass me? Do you know what my neighbours are saying about you?
D: You are worrying more than enough.

Conversation B.
Mother: Your performance was excellent among other players, the adagio movement in particular.
Daughter: Oh, yes.
M: What if your performance was bad after practicing many years. It’s shameful. And you didn’t embarrass me in the slightest.
D: You are exaggerating.

Conversation C.
Son: It was good to see Dad get the goal at today’s Parents’ Sports Day.
Father. I was a basketball player while at school.
S: My friends said you played like a professional player.
F: I hope I didn’t embarrass you in front of your friends.

Are A, B, C used correctly in the previous conversations?

Thank you

FounDit
Posted: Saturday, September 29, 2018 11:14:32 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,886
Neurons: 51,912
onsen wrote:
Hello,

Quote:
A. Are you trying to embarrass me?
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

B. You didn’t embarrass me in the slightest.
(Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary)

C. I hope I didn’t embarrass you in front of your friends.
Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English .



Though the definition of the verb 'embarrss' is not difficult, it is difficult to understand sentences with it in them as regards in what situations the sentences are used from whom to whom.
embarrass .

Below are conversations made with the sentences A, B and C. I name them Conversation A, B and C, respectively.

Conversation A.
Mother: Dyeing your hair red, painting your fingernails blue, what do you think you’re going to be when you’re still merely a shoolgirl?
Daughter: Is it wrong to do that? Other mates do that.
M: Are you trying to embarrass me? Do you know what my neighbours are saying about you?
D: You are worrying more than enough.
You seem to understand the word very well. This example is an excellent situation that shows how embarrassment works. The mother fears what others will think of her; that she will be diminished in their estimation because the daughter is a reflection of the mother. It is a form of rejection by her neighbors and friends.

Conversation B.
Mother: Your performance was excellent among other players, the adagio movement in particular.
Daughter: Oh, yes.
M: What if your performance was bad after practicing many years. It’s shameful. And you didn’t embarrass me in the slightest.
D: You are exaggerating.
Here, again, the mother fears what others may think of her because of her daughter's performance. The mother sees the daughter as a reflection of herself.

It would have been more accurate, however, if the daughter had said she made a mistake while playing and asked her mother if she was embarrassed. Then the mother could say, "You didn't embarrass me in the slightest".

Conversation C.
Son: It was good to see Dad get the goal at today’s Parents’ Sports Day.
Father. I was a basketball player while at school.
S: My friends said you played like a professional player.
F: I hope I didn’t embarrass you in front of your friends.
Very good. Another example where the behavior of one person might cause discomfort to another because of a fear of rejection.

Are A, B, C used correctly in the previous conversations?

Thank you



We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
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