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Is "enactment" the right word? Options
robjen
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 3:22:46 PM
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(1) In the antique club, Tom notices that one seller and one buyer are having a suspicious business deal. The buyer is spending a lot of money on his expensive merchandise. Tom thinks the transaction is an enactment to trick people into thinking that the seller's antiques are very valuable.

Is "enactment" the right word? If not, could someone give the correct word for that? Thanks a lot.
palapaguy
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 4:13:01 PM

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I think "act" is what you're looking for.
johnfl
Posted: Saturday, September 15, 2018 4:23:06 PM

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TO BE OR NOT TO BE! TO DO OR NOT TOO.
sureshot
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 1:04:26 AM
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robjen wrote:
(1) In the antique club, Tom notices that one seller and one buyer are having a suspicious business deal. The buyer is spending a lot of money on his expensive merchandise. Tom thinks the transaction is an enactment to trick people into thinking that the seller's antiques are very valuable.

Is "enactment" the right word? If not, could someone give the correct word for that? Thanks a lot.


_____________

"Enactment" is not the correct word. The word refers to the process of passing a legislation. I think that the word "ploy" should meet your requirements. The word refers to an action designed to turn a situation to one's own advantage.

crosswired
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 1:33:38 AM

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entrapment would be better than enactment.
ozok
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 2:06:00 AM
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Sureshot's suggestion is good.


'Entrapment' is more like something that the police would do.



just sayin'
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 4:44:02 AM

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robjen wrote:
(1) In the antique club, Tom notices that one seller and one buyer are having a suspicious business deal. The buyer is spending a lot of money on his expensive merchandise. Tom thinks the transaction is an enactment to trick people into thinking that the seller's antiques are very valuable.

Is "enactment" the right word? If not, could someone give the correct word for that? Thanks a lot.


A better phrase for the transaction would be "a scam". As others have noted, "an enactment" refers to a published act of a legislative body.

More to the point, it is not the transaction itself which is reprehensible, but rather the conspiracy between the seller and the buyer to inflate the value of the vendor's goods.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Monday, September 17, 2018 6:06:06 AM
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Actually, 'enactment' has a completely different meaning to me: it's when actors/history nerds dress in authentique costume to re-enact historical scenes. My brain took in "antique club" and ascribed that meaning to it. So I thought it to mean some re-enacters were acting out a little scene to show how some unscrupulous people in the antique trade had acted. But then its purpose would not be to "trick" the current audience, but rather to demonstrate how people had been tricked in the past.

But then I went back to "the antique club" and realised that was a very strange venue for these things to be happenning in. If you belong to some sort of historical/antique "club" no buying or selling would be taking place. The club meeting place is like any club's meeting venue (tho' it's often in a local pub!): chairs, tables, a desk - a place to talk and discuss things.

So I am completely confused now and realise that I don't, in fact, understand what the text is about at all.
leonAzul
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 5:45:39 PM

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Romany wrote:

Actually, 'enactment' has a completely different meaning to me: it's when actors/history nerds dress in authentique costume to re-enact historical scenes. My brain took in "antique club" and ascribed that meaning to it. So I thought it to mean some re-enacters were acting out a little scene to show how some unscrupulous people in the antique trade had acted. But then its purpose would not be to "trick" the current audience, but rather to demonstrate how people had been tricked in the past.


Hadn't thought about it that way, yet it does make sense.

Let's hope robjen returns and clarifies which sense of "enactment" was intended.

"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
Romany
Posted: Tuesday, September 18, 2018 5:59:32 PM
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Yes indeed! I don't like not knowing - but then I dislike not finding out, even more.
mactoria
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 1:52:59 AM
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Robjen hasn't responded yet to Romany's request for clarification on what 'antique club' refers to, so I'll just toss in my agreement with Sureshot's suggestion that the word "ploy" is the better word to be used in the sentence's context. The sentence describes a situation in which the seller is using a ploy/strategy/scam/etc to drive up the price buyers are willing to pay for the seller's other merchandise (ie if Buyer A is willing to pay $ for the Seller's antique, then gosh the Seller must be selling really legitimate antiques at a good price).


There are 'antique clubs' as well as 'antique furniture clubs' and 'antique auto clubs,' etc. It might have been less confusing to some if the club had a name (e.g. New York City Antiques Club, Jones' Antique Club, etc.) or was capitalized as a proper name. I'm reading the sentence literally and as it would commonly be read (at least in the US I believe) to refer to a place where antiques are sold, not where a re-enactment of something would occur which seems least likely. The choice of 'enactment' is an inaccurate word choice for the assumed context (a place/club where antiques are sold), which seems to be why Robjen asked if it was correct or not.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, September 19, 2018 2:04:00 AM

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Is must be a difference between British English and American English, an "antique club" here would be a group of people that were interested in antiques meet and discuss them or temporarily the place where they meet such as a village hall, school or a scout hut. There may be a small amount of private selling between individuals.

A place where antiques where sold on a regular basis would,be an antique shop, antique market or sometimes an antique centre.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, September 20, 2018 3:51:37 AM

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Having read through the thread, and then gone back to Robjen's original question, I understand "antique club" to be a meeting where dealers buy and sell antiques.

In this case, I would use "act" or "scam" or "trick". "Ploy" is good, but not a word I'd normally use.

Tom thinks the transaction is an act to trick people into thinking that the seller's antiques are very valuable.
Tom thinks the transaction is a trick to fool people into thinking that the seller's antiques are very valuable.
Tom thinks the transaction is a scam to trick people into thinking that the seller's antiques are very valuable.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 8:33:12 AM
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Drago -

Yes, I know that's how it sounds - but as I said, and Sarries expanded upon - that's just not how it works.

Most antique dealers belong to Associations which are part of their accreditation.

Individual dealers may form or join Clubs just as individual buyers may do. But no buying or selling takes place at these club meetings. It's all rather boring stuff about trends and and investments etc. They don't all lug stuff down to be pub or meeting room to sell them off. The majority of selling now takes place on-line or at auction, not in private Club meetings - that sounds decidedly clandestine or just plain dodgy.

The Antinque Trade now is hedged around with so many regulatory bodies and proscriptions it would be impossible to regulate all the hundreds of clubs if they were trading privately between themselves at club meetings! Do you see what I mean?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 9:04:49 AM

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Oh - I thought it was all about liking nicely-made old things and buying them in flea-markets in Marakesh and so on - then maybe selling a few of them to friends and acquaintances.

Bit like Arthur Evans's collection of seal-stones.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 12:49:25 PM

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I just accidentally turned on the TV to BBC2 - Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is.
It's a competition - starting off with the same amount of money and making as much profit as possible in the day (for charity) buying and selling antiques.

Though the contestants end up at an 'official' auction, they visit antique shops, village hall antique markets, and even a bunch of stalls set up on the beach, rather like a car-boot sale, but higher class.

I'd never thought of antiques really as a way of making money - more of just a hobby and something to collect like stamps or something.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 6:16:41 AM
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Drago -

the antiques trade is huge in England - it contributes in large part to our economy. I have read in more than one source how essential it is to our Trade - but have never actually followed those articles up.

Working now in the Heritage/Historic sector - and especially in Brighton/London, many of the people I come in contact with do indeed make their (sometimes hugely substantial) living through both the Antique and Vintage trades.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 6:49:24 AM

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Hi Romany.

It's my provincial upbringing, I suppose.

Despite sort of "knowing about" this sort of thing, it doesn't enter my mind as background data when I'm looking at a sentence.

The idea of buying something, just to sell it and make a profit is 'foreign'.

When I see 'antiques' as a trade in a sentence, I think of antique restoration (taking an old battered secretary and remaking it using original materials and skills etc. maybe) or antiquities discovery (finding an old ship's chronometer in a junk shop and researching its history and provenance).
Then maybe selling them, with their value having been increased by the person's work.
Not just buying at one (depressed) price and selling exactly the same article at another (expanded) price.

To me that doesn't sound like a job, it sounds like a con - or a game as the people on the TV show played. It sounds like a hobby - something one might do in an "antiques club".


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 9:36:36 AM

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The experts make a living at it, the using their expertise in antiques to spot bargains and selling them elsewhere at a profit.

There is a particular lady who appears on the tyoe of show you have mentioned that has an auction house in Scotland she travels parts of England and buys things with a Highland motif cheaply knowing that once she returns with those items to Scotland she can sell them at a profit to tourists wanting to take a piece of Scotland home with them.

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
ritabos
Posted: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 8:25:29 AM

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Enactment is not the correct word as, its meaning is the process of passing legislation. that doesn't suite on the sentence.
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