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Get help vs take help Options
kingston124
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 10:14:02 AM
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I want to get his help.

I want to take his help

Please tell the difference.
IMcRout
Posted: Thursday, November 16, 2017 3:42:57 PM

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The first sentence says that you want him to assist you.
The second sentence says that you want to take away his (kitchen?) help, that
beautiful red-haired young girl.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 9:47:26 AM

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I agree - 'take' doesn't really work.

As a note - The first one is not a very common way to say it, either.

I would expect to hear one of these if you just mean that you want his help (you hope that he will decide to help):
I would like his help.
I would like him to help.
I want him to help.
I want his help.


If you mean that you want to do something to persuade him to help, I would expect:
I want to get him to help.

"Get" is used in many ways, but it often (not always) includes an idea of 'causing oneself to have something'.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 10:33:19 AM

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Would it work if someone was offering their help?

"John offered to lend me the £1000 to get my car repaired"
"I want to take his help, but I won"t be able to repay him"

I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:08:04 AM

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Wouldn't you rather 'accept' or 'welcome' the help than 'take' it, SF?
I'd certainly 'take' the money. Whistle

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 11:11:28 AM

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IMcRout wrote:
Wouldn't you rather 'accept' or 'welcome' the help than 'take' it, SF?
I'd certainly 'take' the money. Whistle


Yes you could accept or welcome his help, but I do not think take his help is stricly speaking wrong in this context.

It might not be the first choice of words that I would chose to use though.


I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
IMcRout
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 12:45:53 PM

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I agree that it is not 'stricly speaking wrong' and I do even concede that most native and non-native speakers would understand what is meant, but it does hurt my poor teutonic eyes and ears.

I totally take back all those times I didn't want to nap when I was younger. (Anon)
Romany
Posted: Friday, November 17, 2017 12:56:03 PM
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The reason I usually put the words "wrong" and "incorrect" in inverted commas is because grammar plays very little part in what makes an English sentence sub-standard. The grammar may be impeccable - but if it's something we don't say in English then it's not part of the way to speak English.

Then again, the grammar may not make sense, but if it's something everybody says in English anyway, then it IS part of the English language.

No-one can stop you saying whatever you want to say in the way you want to say it - but if it isn't what English speakers say it will always sound strange and "foreign" to them.
TMe
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 11:03:20 AM

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Not much difference. IMO

I am a layman.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 11:51:08 AM
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Undoubtedly the majority of people would agree with you.

That's why it's so nice to have a space like TFD - where people who really do care about language can get together and be word-nerds.Applause
Dennis Chen
Posted: Sunday, November 19, 2017 12:19:44 PM

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kingston124 wrote:
I want to get his help.

I want to take his help

Please tell the difference.



Get is when you want the help.

Although take is rarely used in this situation, take is when you want to accept help from someone.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 11:06:02 PM

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One 'problem' with the word "take" (at least in my understanding of British English) is that the first two meanings - the most common ones which tend to influence the listener slightly do not fit your meaning:

take
vb (mainly tr) , takes, taking, took or taken
1. (also intr) to gain possession of (something) by force or effort
2. to appropriate or steal: to take other people's belongings.

Collins English Dictionary

You do not take someone's help by force - and you don't steal it.

There are twenty or more other definitions, of course, but these two 'colour' the word to me.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Харбин Хэйлунцзян 1
Posted: Tuesday, November 21, 2017 11:17:49 PM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
There are twenty or more other definitions, of course, but these two 'colour' the word to me.

I finally condescended to read this thread and must say that this is exactly what I've been thinking of this long week though I immediately understood that the OP was speaking of "accepting someone's help".

აბა ყვავებს ვინ დაიჭერს, კარგო? გალიაში ბულბულები ზიან.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 1:29:37 AM

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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
One 'problem' with the word "take" (at least in my understanding of British English) is that the first two meanings - the most common ones which tend to influence the listener slightly do not fit your meaning:

take
vb (mainly tr) , takes, taking, took or taken
1. (also intr) to gain possession of (something) by force or effort
2. to appropriate or steal: to take other people's belongings.

Collins English Dictionary

You do not take someone's help by force - and you don't steal it.

There are twenty or more other definitions, of course, but these two 'colour' the word to me.


It's just a matter of perception and depends on which dictionary you use and the order that they put the definitions in.
Take
1Lay hold of (something) with one's hands; reach for and hold.
‘he leaned forward to take her hand'.
Oxford Dictionaries

This seems quite romantic when you look at it this way.

4Accept or receive (someone or something)
‘she was advised to take any job offered'
Oxford Dictionaries

This to me fits the idea of taking help if it's offered.







I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
Romany
Posted: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 11:22:54 AM
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It's rare that I disagree with you, Sarries, but I just find the word 'take' innapropriately paired with "help" instinctually - nothing to do with dictionaries.

If someone was showing flash-cards to sort roughly into groups: - positive, negative and neutral - I wouldn't think I was alone in regarding the word "take" as a negative, or simply neutral, concept?

Whereas "help" is a warm fuzzly positive concept.

Thus pairing them appears to me somehow "off".
Akhilesh Pandey 1
Posted: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 12:55:54 AM

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Both sentences seem pretty same but eventually, it's quite different from each other, the sentence where you say "Take Help" it's used when you ask and someone helps you so that you're taking help from that one person and the sentence where you say "Get Help" it pretends that when you didn't ask for help and usually someone helps you. Hope I'm right please let me know if I was wrong.
Regards:
Akhil

Romany
Posted: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 11:16:05 AM
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Akhilesh Pandey 1,

Hello, nice to meet you.

I'd just like to explain that each thread is concerned with one particular question (usually) . So each answer will be discussing that question.After reading what has been said so far, if no-one has mentioned something you want to know, then of course bring that up and ask.

If you read ALL the answers people have given on this qquestion, you will see that your question has been answered. If, having read these answers, you are still unsure, tell us why - we'd be only too happy to help.
maccnacc
Posted: Monday, January 8, 2018 6:03:50 AM
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both are looks like same
amyjackson
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 4:43:59 AM

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I think Both are looks like same, no difference b/w them.
Fyfardens
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 7:06:39 AM
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amyjackson wrote:
I think Both are looks like same, no difference b/w them.

maccnacc wrote:
both are looks like same


It might be an idea for you, amyjackson and maccnacc, to wait until your own English is at a higher level before you respond to, or comment on, questions.

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Jyrkkä Jätkä
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 7:21:05 AM

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Fyfardens wrote:
amyjackson wrote:
I think Both are looks like same, no difference b/w them.

maccnacc wrote:
both are looks like same


It might be an idea for you, amyjackson and maccnacc, to wait until your own English is at a higher level before you respond to, or comment on, questions.


The way to higher levels in commanding English language comes with the courage to comment in threads here. You never learn if you never open your mouth or write a comment. Never mind if there's a mistake or a typo, just try again.



In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.
Fyfardens
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 7:25:24 AM
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I stand rebuked.

I speak British English (standard southern, slightly dated).
Romany
Posted: Saturday, January 20, 2018 11:31:34 AM
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Amy & Macnacc -

If you still cannot see what the difference is, perhaps you should read again the comments which appear above.

However, even if you don't understand it, what we are saying is that "take" is not a word English speakers normally pair with "help". Even colloquially we don't "take" help.

Whether you agree with it or not, that's just the way it is in English.
riyajoshi
Posted: Sunday, July 29, 2018 1:42:23 AM
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A Native speaker can tell you the difference. but it looks same meaning of these to sentences.
Sangwon Lee
Posted: Monday, August 6, 2018 10:21:56 PM

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Both are very similar, but it sounds hard.
palapaguy
Posted: Tuesday, August 7, 2018 12:50:47 AM

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kingston124 wrote:
I want to get his help.

I want to take his help

Please tell the difference.


To my AE ear, both are understandable and acceptable. "Get" is more common. There's little difference between the two, other than "take" implies that the help has already been offered.
mobilbahis
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 9:40:31 AM
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Thank you so much
FounDit
Posted: Friday, September 21, 2018 11:03:09 AM

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kingston124 wrote:
I want to get his help.

I want to take his help

Please tell the difference.


To my American ear, there would be a slight difference. If someone said to me, "I want to get his help", I would think the person intends to ask for help from someone.

But, "I want to take his help", would imply to me that an offer of help had already been put forth. So, "I want to take his (offer to) help" would mean "accept" the help already offered.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
Romany
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 6:20:20 AM
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In BE we would tend to say "take him up on" his offer of help.

"I'd like to take him up on his offer of help."
"I'm thinking of taking him up on his offer of help."
FounDit
Posted: Saturday, September 22, 2018 11:07:20 AM

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Romany wrote:

In BE we would tend to say "take him up on" his offer of help.

"I'd like to take him up on his offer of help."
"I'm thinking of taking him up on his offer of help."


We would also say exactly these kinds of things in AmE.


We should look to the past to learn from it, not destroy our future because of it — FounDit
jay12
Posted: Friday, October 26, 2018 8:00:35 AM
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Thanks for sharing this information. yes, really a great post. I like this post.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, October 26, 2018 8:08:56 AM

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jay12 wrote:
Thanks for sharing this information. yes, really a great post. I like this post.

Hello Jay.
Welcome to the forum!
I'm glad you found it helpful.

Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
bahis siteleri
Posted: Thursday, November 15, 2018 8:55:00 AM
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thank you so much
jorel scott
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 4:03:24 AM

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Both are very similar dude
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, December 10, 2018 5:36:34 PM

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jorel scott wrote:
Both are very similar dude

I'm afraid you're a little late.
Kingston hasn't visited this site for a year or so.

However, welcome to the forum"


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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