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Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise. Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 2:39:04 AM

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Quotation of the Day
Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.
Charles Dickens (1812-1870)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 4:11:47 AM
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Daemon wrote:
Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


Yeah. Is the price fair or exorbitant in this case?
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 10:59:08 AM

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Context from:Great Expectations

CHAPTER 27

“MY DEAR MR PIP,

“I write this by request of Mr. Gargery, for to let you know that he is going to London in company with Mr. Wopsle and would be glad if agreeable to be allowed to see you. He would call at Barnard’s Hotel Tuesday morning 9 o’clock, when if not agreeable please leave word. Your poor sister is much the same as when you left. We talk of you in the kitchen every night, and wonder what you are saying and doing. If now considered in the light of a liberty, excuse it for the love of poor old days. No more, dear Mr. Pip, from

“Your ever obliged, and affectionate servant,

“BIDDY.”

“P.S. He wishes me most particular to write what larks. He says you will understand. I hope and do not doubt it will be agreeable to see him even though a gentleman, for you had ever a good heart, and he is a worthy worthy man. I have read him all excepting only the last little sentence, and he wishes me most particular to write again what larks.”

I received this letter by the post on Monday morning, and therefore its appointment was for next day. Let me confess exactly, with what feelings I looked forward to Joe’s coming.

Not with pleasure, though I was bound to him by so many ties; no; with considerable disturbance, some mortification, and a keen sense of incongruity. If I could have kept him away by paying money, I certainly would have paid money. My greatest reassurance was, that he was coming to Barnard’s Inn, not to Hammersmith, and consequently would not fall in Bentley Drummle’s way. I had little objection to his being seen by Herbert or his father, for both of whom I had a respect; but I had the sharpest sensitiveness as to his being seen by Drummle, whom I held in contempt. So, throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

I had begun to be always decorating the chambers in some quite unnecessary and inappropriate way or other, and very expensive those wrestles with Barnard proved to be. By this time, the rooms were vastly different from what I had found them, and I enjoyed the honour of occupying a few prominent pages in the books of a neighbouring upholsterer. I had got on so fast of late, that I had even started a boy in boots—top boots—in bondage and slavery to whom I might have been said to pass my days. For, after I had made the monster (out of the refuse of my washerwoman’s family) and had clothed him with a blue coat, canary waistcoat, white cravat, creamy breeches, and the boots already mentioned, I had to find him a little to do and a great deal to eat; and with both of those horrible requirements he haunted my existence.

Read more :http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/140/great-expectations/2571/chapter-27/


Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 4:47:44 PM

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The son of a naval clerk, Dickens spent his early childhood in London and in Chatham. When he was 12 his father was imprisoned for debt, and Charles was compelled to work in a blacking warehouse. He never forgot this double humiliation. At 17 he was a court stenographer, and later he was an expert parliamentary reporter for the Morning Chronicle. His sketches, mostly of London life (signed Boz), began appearing in periodicals in 1833, and the collection Sketches by Boz (1836) was a success.
dave argo
Posted: Sunday, September 16, 2018 7:01:06 PM

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Daemon wrote:
Throughout life, our worst weaknesses and meannesses are usually committed for the sake of the people whom we most despise.

Charles Dickens (1812-1870)


Pip had this pip about his brother-in-law Joe, ashamed of him for being a commoner; no regard for Drummle who deserved to be given the pip, yet Pip commits a weakness and meanness for the sake of a despised pipsqueak. It pips all Great Expectations.
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