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It contributes greatly towards a man's moral and intellectual health to be brought into habits of companionship with... Options
Daemon
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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It contributes greatly towards a man's moral and intellectual health to be brought into habits of companionship with individuals unlike himself, who care little for his pursuits, and whose sphere and abilities he must go out of himself to appreciate.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)
monamagda
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 5:19:19 AM

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Context from:THE SCARLET LETTER

PREFACE

There was one thing that much aided me in renewing and re-creating the stalwart soldier of the Niagara frontier,—the man of true and simple energy. It was the recollection of those memorable words of his,—“I’ll try, Sir!”—spoken on the very verge of a desperate and heroic enterprise, and breathing the soul and spirit of New England hardihood, comprehending all perils, and encountering all. If, in our country, valor were rewarded by heraldic honor, this phrase—which it seems so easy to speak, but which only he, with such a task of danger and glory before him, has ever spoken—would be the best and fittest of all mottoes for the General’s shield of arms. There was one thing that helped me re-create this brave soldier, and that was remembering his words, “I’ll try, sir.” The General spoke them as he set out to battle in the War of 1812. Those words summed up New England hardiness, acknowledged danger, and faced everything. If our country honored bravery with a coat of arms, that phrase would be the General’s motto. The words seem easy to speak, but only he has ever spoken them while facing such danger and glory.

It contributes greatly towards a man’s moral and intellectual health, to be brought into habits of companionship with individuals unlike himself, who care little for his pursuits, and whose sphere and abilities he must go out of himself to appreciate. The accidents of my life have often afforded me this advantage, but never with more fullness and variety than during my continuance in office. There was one man, especially, the observation of whose character gave me a new idea of talent. His gifts were emphatically those of a man of business; prompt, acute, clear-minded; with an eye that saw through all perplexities, and a faculty of arrangement that made them vanish, as by the waving of an enchanter’s wand. Bred up from boyhood in the Custom-House, it was his proper field of activity; and the many intricacies of business, so harassing to the interloper, presented themselves before him with the regularity of a perfectly comprehended system. In my contemplation, he stood as the ideal of his class. He was, indeed, the Custom-House in himself; or, at all events, the main-spring that kept its variously revolving wheels in motion; for, in an institution like this, where its officers are appointed to subserve their own profit and convenience, and seldom with a leading reference to their fitness for the duty to be performed, they must perforce seek elsewhere the dexterity which is not in them. Thus, by an inevitable necessity, as a magnet attracts steel-filings, so did our man of business draw to himself the difficulties which everybody met with. With an easy condescension, and kind forbearance towards our stupidity,—which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime,—would he forthwith, by the merest touch of his finger, make the incomprehensible as clear as daylight. The merchants valued him not less than we, his esoteric friends. His integrity was perfect; it was a law of nature with him, rather than a choice or a principle; nor can it be otherwise than the main condition of an intellect so remarkably clear and accurate as his, to be honest and regular in the administration of affairs. A stain on his conscience, as to any thing that came within the range of his vocation, would trouble such a man very much in the same way, though to a far greater degree, than an error in the balance of an account, or an ink-blot on the fair page of a book of record. Here, in a word,—and it is a rare instance in my life,—I had met with a person thoroughly adapted to the situation which he held.

Read more :https://www.shmoop.com/scarlet-letter/preface-full-text-13.html

Doodle Snackers
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 10:19:59 AM
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Joined: 1/17/2016
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Daemon wrote:
It contributes greatly towards a man's moral and intellectual health to be brought into habits of companionship with individuals unlike himself, who care little for his pursuits, and whose sphere and abilities he must go out of himself to appreciate.

http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/Nathaniel+Hawthorne (1804-1864)


Genius likes company. Brick wall
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 10:24:09 AM

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It contributes greatly towards a man's moral and intellectual health to be brought into habits of companionship with individuals unlike himself, who care little for his pursuits, and whose sphere and abilities he must go out of himself to appreciate.
Bully_rus
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 11:03:01 AM
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Joined: 3/26/2013
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Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
It contributes greatly towards a man's moral and intellectual health to be brought into habits of companionship with individuals unlike himself, who care little for his pursuits, and whose sphere and abilities he must go out of himself to appreciate.

Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)


Yeah. Anyway there must be some kind of mutual attraction between them as a precondition for any fruitful prolonged companionship...
renee talley 1
Posted: Friday, September 14, 2018 11:17:20 PM
Rank: Member

Joined: 8/1/2018
Posts: 111
Neurons: 2,403
Anxious Shhh Eh? Eh? Eh? To enjoy your own company helps you to realize you have the ability to become independent to appreciate the small things in life whose sphere pursues & becomes entangled yourself from not realize that a companion will need to wait for their vitality and indepth of your beautiful mind not for the sake of being intellectual abiliyt that greatly target towards a mutual understanding appreciating your tiem & talent that never lacks splendid approval of being in the presence of alilke minded person after all!!!Whistle Applause d'oh! Anxious
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