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call on Options
prince
Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2018 11:26:13 PM
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"It also said that call on the recommendations by fair market conduct committee to further strengthen the rules to deter financial crimes like frauds, market manipulations and insider trading, will be taken soon"


I understand that, "call on" means implement the recommendations in the above para.

kindly advise me.

thank you
Prince
palapaguy
Posted: Wednesday, September 12, 2018 11:36:42 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/28/2013
Posts: 1,204
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Location: Calabasas, California, United States
prince wrote:
"It also said that call on the recommendations by fair market conduct committee to further strengthen the rules to deter financial crimes like frauds, market manipulations and insider trading, will be taken soon"

I understand that, "call on" means implement the recommendations in the above para.

kindly advise me.

thank you
Prince


I must admit that I don't understand it at all. Maybe one of the members can clarify it.
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 2:09:00 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,018
Neurons: 73,101
I agree it sounds a bit odd. But I think 'call' is decision.
Not guaranteed implementation. The committee will make a decision, and that could be to implement the recommendations or ignore them.

But it is an odd way of saying it.
It seems to be missing the article.
You make a call on something - make a decision.

But here there is no 'make' and no article.


Quote:
call noun (DECISION)

[ C ] informal a decision:

It was a tough call, but eventually I decided to give up my job.
More investment? That's got to be your call - you're the one that's paying!


sureshot
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 6:02:18 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/16/2015
Posts: 2,022
Neurons: 378,148
prince wrote:
"It also said that call on the recommendations by fair market conduct committee to further strengthen the rules to deter financial crimes like frauds, market manipulations and insider trading, will be taken soon"


I understand that, "call on" means implement the recommendations in the above para.

kindly advise me.

thank you
Prince

_____________________

Your basic understanding of the noun "call is correct. It means "a decision; judgement". The fair market conduct committee constituted by SEBI has already submitted its recommendations on measures to to further strengthen the rules to deter financial crimes like frauds, market manipulations and insider trading in the stock market.SEBI has now put the recommendations in public domain and is seeking comments. SEBI is expected to take a call (= view/decision) on the recommendations very soon after considering the comments of the public.

I hope this elucidation helps you.
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 9:09:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/4/2016
Posts: 522
Neurons: 2,712
Location: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
So should it be "to make a call on..." or "to take a call on..."? Or are both options possible?

I think I've seen "call" used to mean a decision, but not in the context "to take a decision". So it would be good to have clarity on which preposition should be used in this case.
Thanks!
thar
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 9:31:42 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/8/2010
Posts: 18,018
Neurons: 73,101
The website this comes from has options of viewing the page in Hindi, Gujarati and English.

It does not sound like correct English to me, a BrE speaker.
Even if it were a natural idiom, the structure of the sentence feels very clumsy.

I can only assume it is
a) not written by a native speaker and is just a bit wrong
or
b) written by a speaker of Indian English, which does have its own idioms and word usage.

Only someone from that region will be able to comment on that.
Kirill Vorobyov
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 9:42:38 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/4/2016
Posts: 522
Neurons: 2,712
Location: Moscow, Moscow, Russia
Thank you very much, Thar!

Then I undertsand I better not use it in this context... If it doesn't sound quite standard to a British ear when spoken/written by somebody perhaps having a closely related linguistic background (India), I guess it would sound even worse if said by a more "distant" foreigner like me. At any rate I will never have an excuse of representing a valid "variant" of English. Angel
NKM
Posted: Thursday, September 13, 2018 2:55:23 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,964
Neurons: 276,007
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
I'm a native speaker (American English), and even allowing for a couple of missing articles I found it difficult to make any sense of the sentence.

There are too many embedded phrases, a long string of attributive nouns ("fair market conduct committee"), and simply too many words intervening between subject and predicate. All of that renders the sentence virtually unreadable — in other words, not good English.

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