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D00M
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 11:13:53 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,498
Neurons: 7,144
Hello respected teachers,

I would appreciate it if you could bring the errors of my writing to my notice.

Nowadays the way many people interact with each other has changed because of technology. In what ways has technology affected the types of relationships people make? Has this become a positive or negative development?


Technology has revolutionized everything in almost every facet of life today, the most tangible evidence being the way people communicate compared to the past. As a matter of fact, every new trend has its own downsides, so too does the new ways of interaction. However, overall, it can be argued that it has been a successful transition.

To begin with, thanks to technology, people today are able to connect with each other effectively and quickly. Using a simple application like Telegram or Skype, they can get in touch through voice messages or streaming video live, which was impossible for many people in the 20th century to conceive of. In the not-too-distant past, on the contrary, people had to take marathon journeys to meet one another, and the dominant way of communication was to send handwritten letters, which was not very reliable and likely to get delivered, if at all, on time. Getting back to more recent times, the users of the leading-edge technologies today have significantly cut down on using paper as well as cable and landline phones resulting in a much lower bills.

Similarly, cutting-edge technology has altered the way people communicate in the workplace today. Memos, for instance, have no longer to be carried by hand to difference places in or outside a department. Owing to broadcast programs, a manager need not give the same message to his subordinates one by one. Furthermore, that people have not to wait for others to turn up in order to correspond has also made work much more convenient. Their online mailbox is always there to receive messages from everywhere around the world. Last but not least, many conferences are being held online, granting people the privilege of participating in normal and urgent meetings at any time, from any place. This has undoubtedly ironed out insurmountable problems of such gatherings.

In a nutshell, there is no way around the fact that technology has dramatically altered the ways people interact today. This transformation, by and large, has brought about far-reaching and beneficial consequences for different people around the global.


The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 12:29:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,949
Neurons: 174,379
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Hi D00M.

There's not a lot to say. I like it.
There are parts in which I would say it differently (but that is just choice of words, style etc.)

I think you may have some false data about the postal service - "which was not very reliable and likely to get delivered, if at all, on time" is a gross exaggeration, I'm afraid. It wasn't THAT bad - 99.99% of letters would arrive at the correct destination within a day (in the UK).

"to be carried by hand to difference places" should be "to be carried by hand to different places".

"a manager need not give the same message to his subordinates one by one" Applause Applause good on getting the verbs correct in this bit!

"Furthermore, that people have not to wait for others to turn up . . ." - there are two negatives of "have to" which mean different things. I think you mean "people don't have to wait".
You have to = you must
You haven't to = you have not to = it is forbidden = you must not
You don't have to = there is no rule = you are free to do it or not.

Skype conferences are pretty good, these days!



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 2:40:28 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,335
Neurons: 44,589
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
Doom - my advice would be to read the question again.

You have supported the first part: you've agreed and provided instances of the ways technology has changed the way people communicate. But this was not at issue:it's an accepted fact.

What you are being asked is: In what ways has technology affected the types of relationships people make? Has this become a positive or negative development?

They are asking about relationships. Do people make more friends with this increase in technology? Do relationships solidify more quickly now? Or do they become meaningless after a while? Have people started to trust each other more? Are they able to more easily find others who are similar to them? Do people feel they are more alien than ever? Is our understanding of other people improved by this change in communication? Has bullying become a way of life? Have people become fearful of each other?......the ways to answer are numerous. And the factors you discuss here must then be used to back up your conclusions about whether the world is a better place or not because of them. (Is it a positive or negative devolpment in the field of human relationships.)

Had I, as your lecturer, set these questions, I'm afraid I'd consider you hadn't answered correctly, so wouldn't assess how well you had expressed yourself. Anxious
NKM
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 5:57:19 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,875
Neurons: 264,619
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
D00M wrote:
Hello respected teachers,

I would appreciate it if you could bring the errors of my writing to my notice.

Nowadays the way many people interact with each other has changed because of technology. In what ways has technology affected the types of relationships people make? Has this become a positive or negative development?


Technology has revolutionized everything in almost every facet of life today, the most tangible evidence being the way people communicate compared to the past. As a matter of fact, every new trend has its own downsides, so too does the new ways of interaction. However, overall, it can be argued that it has been a successful transition.

To begin with, thanks to technology, people today are able to connect with each other effectively and quickly. Using a simple application like Telegram or Skype, they can get in touch through voice messages or streaming video live, which was impossible for many people in the 20th century to conceive of. In the not-too-distant past, on the contrary, people had to take marathon journeys to meet one another, and the dominant way of communication was to send handwritten letters, which was not very reliable and likely to get delivered, if at all, on time. Getting back to more recent times, the users of the leading-edge technologies today have significantly cut down on using paper as well as cable and landline phones resulting in a much lower bills.

Similarly, cutting-edge technology has altered the way people communicate in the workplace today. Memos, for instance, have no longer to be carried by hand to difference places in or outside a department. Owing to broadcast programs, a manager need not give the same message to his subordinates one by one. Furthermore, that people have not to wait for others to turn up in order to correspond has also made work much more convenient. Their online mailbox is always there to receive messages from everywhere around the world. Last but not least, many conferences are being held online, granting people the privilege of participating in normal and urgent meetings at any time, from any place. This has undoubtedly ironed out insurmountable problems of such gatherings.

In a nutshell, there is no way around the fact that technology has dramatically altered the ways people interact today. This transformation, by and large, has brought about far-reaching and beneficial consequences for different people around the global.

══════════════════════════════════════════════

Technology has revolutionized almost every facet of life today, the most tangible evidence being the way people communicate compared to the past. Of course, every new trend has its own downsides; so too do the new ways of interacting. Overall, however, it can be argued that this has been a successful transition.

To begin with, thanks to technology people today are able to connect with each other effectively and quickly. Using a simple application like Telegram or Skype, they can get in touch through voice messages or live-streaming video, which many people in the 20th century could not have conceived of. In the not-too-distant past, people sometimes had to take long journeys to meet with one another, and the dominant way of communication was to send handwritten letters, which was sometimes slow and not always reliable. Nowadays, users of leading-edge technologies have significantly cut down on using paper, and are less reliant on cable and landline phones.

Similarly, cutting-edge technology has altered the way people communicate in the workplace today. Memos, for instance, no longer have to be hand-carried to different parts of an organization. Owing to broadcast programs, a manager need not give the same message to his subordinates one by one. Furthermore, that people do not have to wait for others to arrive in order to correspond has also made work much more convenient. Their online mailboxes are always there to receive messages from everywhere around the world. Last but not least, many conferences are being held online, granting people the privilege of participating in normal and urgent meetings at any time, from any place. This has undoubtedly ironed out the potential problems of organizing such gatherings.

In a nutshell, it is undeniable that technology has dramatically altered the ways people interact today. This transformation, by and large, has brought about far-reaching and beneficial consequences for people around the world.


I've done quite a lot of editing, including a few grammar corrections:
 (1) In the first paragraph, I changed the comma after "downsides" to a semicolon;
 (2) In that same sentence, I changed "does" to "do" to agree with the plural "ways of …";
 (3) I changed "have no longer to be" to "no longer have to be".

Aside from those corrections, I changed a few words and phrases and shortened some of your sentences. Most of those changes are a matter of style (to suit my personal preferences), though one at least one ("not very reliable and likely to get delivered ") seemed to cry out for (semantic) clarification.



As Romany has pointed out, you didn't really answer the question. You've cherry-picked the benefits, ignoring the negative aspects.

For instance, nowadays school children are expected to have at least smart phones (or even more expensive "tablets"), and those whose parents cannot afford to buy such costly devices are at a severe disadvantage in the effort to be properly educated. All too often — especially for families with more than one child — it is downright impossible to spend the hundreds of dollars needed for what are now considered essential "school supplies".

NKM
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 6:31:21 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/14/2015
Posts: 4,875
Neurons: 264,619
Location: Corinth, New York, United States
Drag0nspeaker wrote:

You haven't to = you have not to = it is forbidden = you must not

══════════════════════════════════════════════

Is this a real regional (BE/AE) difference?

I don't think I've ever heard "haven't to" used that way. 

If I should ever hear it at all, I would most certainly take it to mean "need not " — like German muss nicht , not English "must not ".

D00M
Posted: Monday, September 10, 2018 11:53:50 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,498
Neurons: 7,144
Thank you very much all.

Is it better now?

Technology has revolutionized almost every facet of life today, the most tangible evidence being the way people communicate compared to the past. Of course, every new trend has its own downsides; so too do the new ways of interacting. Overall, however, it can be argued that this has been a successful transition.


To begin with, thanks to technology people today are able to connect with each other effectively and quickly. Using a simple application like Telegram or Skype, they can get in touch through voice messages or live-streaming video, which many people in the 20th century could not have conceived of. In the not-too-distant past, people sometimes had to take long journeys to meet with one another, and the dominant way of communication was to send handwritten letters, which was sometimes slow and not always reliable. Nowadays, users of leading-edge technologies have significantly cut down on using paper, and are less reliant on cable and landline phones.


Similarly, cutting-edge technology has altered the way people communicate in the workplace today. Memos, for instance, no longer have to be hand-carried to different parts of an organization. Owing to broadcast programs, a manager need not give the same message to his subordinates one by one. Furthermore, that people do not have to wait for others to arrive in order to correspond has also made work much more convenient. Their online mailboxes are always there to receive messages from everywhere around the world. Last but not least, many conferences are being held online, granting people the privilege of participating in normal and urgent meetings at any time, from any place. This has undoubtedly ironed out the potential problems of organizing such gatherings.


Nevertheless, the negative effects of advances in technology seem to coexist along with the benefits. Building healthy and long-standing relationships has become all the more difficult as it is rather complicated to build confidence in the cyberspace. Users may start a relationship with abusers with fake identities, and consequently they usually suffer emotionally or financially. Moreover, to maintain necessary relationships with their teachers and classmates, children nowadays are increasingly reliant on technology. For instance, school children are expected to have at least smart phones (or even more expensive "tablets"), and those whose parents cannot afford to buy such costly devices are at a severe disadvantage in the effort to be properly educated. All too often — especially for families with more than one child — it is downright impossible to spend the hundreds of dollars needed for what are now considered essential "school supplies".


In a nutshell, it is undeniable that technology has dramatically altered the ways people interact today. This transformation, by and large, has brought about far-reaching and beneficial consequences for people around the world. If we use the technology wisely in our relationships and generally in the service of human value, the pluses will definitely overshadow the pitfalls.



The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
D00M
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 12:00:50 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/24/2017
Posts: 1,498
Neurons: 7,144
Romany wrote:
Doom - my advice would be to read the question again.

You have supported the first part: you've agreed and provided instances of the ways technology has changed the way people communicate. But this was not at issue:it's an accepted fact.

What you are being asked is: In what ways has technology affected the types of relationships people make? Has this become a positive or negative development?

They are asking about relationships. Do people make more friends with this increase in technology? Do relationships solidify more quickly now? Or do they become meaningless after a while? Have people started to trust each other more? Are they able to more easily find others who are similar to them? Do people feel they are more alien than ever? Is our understanding of other people improved by this change in communication? Has bullying become a way of life? Have people become fearful of each other?......the ways to answer are numerous. And the factors you discuss here must then be used to back up your conclusions about whether the world is a better place or not because of them. (Is it a positive or negative devolpment in the field of human relationships.)

Had I, as your lecturer, set these questions, I'm afraid I'd consider you hadn't answered correctly, so wouldn't assess how well you had expressed yourself. Anxious


Thank you for your invaluable comment, Romany. You are right, I thought that I had not attended to the question fully too. Self-study is not that easy and I should write a lot to become good at it. So I desperately need the help of all you teachers throughout my endeavor.


The custom of speaking is the original and only just standard of any language. Joseph Priestly- Rudiments of EG, 1761.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, September 11, 2018 3:27:48 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,949
Neurons: 174,379
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
Ah, yes, my mistake. I looked at how the essay read/sounded - not at whether it answered the question fully.

****************
Somewhat off topic, but related:
Hi NKM.
I think the "haven't to do" phrasing is a rather rare alternative - not necessarily regional from what I have heard around the country.

Negatives with <auxiliary verb + infinitive> can be a bit awkward sometimes as there is still some resistance to splitting the infinitive (even though generally it's better than it was fifty years ago). "I have to not eat" (meaning "I have to refrain from eating") is still considered totally taboo by some.

The common way to say it (and, according to some English grammar books and sites, the only correct one) is "must not do" - but that's not (technically) a negative of "have to do"; it's a negative of "must do".

I think I've usually heard it in contrasts.
"What's your new diet like?"
"Hard. I have to eat six times a day with lots of protein, eat lots of vegetables and drink a gallon of water - and I haven't to eat cake."


It seems like a grading in attitude.
I don't have to eat cake. (I can if I wish, but there's no rule to say I must)
I haven't to eat cake. (a simple statement)
I have to not eat cake! (stress, horror)

Probably the possible ambiguity is the reason that "must", "don't have to" and "mustn't" have become the standard phrases.

*****
I searched around and it seems to be very formal (most of the 'hits' are from Parliamentary records and so on) and archaic (it was used regularly until about 1875, then suddenly dropped off - possibly some nineteenth-century grammarian complained).
Also interesting is the fact that there are at least two books of naval communications and signalling procedure which have specific (different) signals for "must have", "must not have", "have to have", "have not to have", "have to not have" and so on - hundreds of them.

Most of the areas I have lived in have connections to the sea, (Plymouth, Sunderland, Lancashire) I may have heard it more than most would.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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