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So much does friendship triumph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings vanish at the meeting not only of real friends,... Options
Daemon
Posted: Sunday, August 19, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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So much does friendship triumph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings vanish at the meeting not only of real friends, but of the most distant acquaintances, and substitutes happiness in their room.

John Filson (1747-1788)
KSPavan
Posted: Sunday, August 19, 2018 2:26:28 AM

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Quotation of the Day

So much does friendship triumph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings vanish at the meeting not only of real friends, but of the most distant acquaintances, and substitutes happiness in their room.

John Filson (1747-1788)
Bully_rus
Posted: Sunday, August 19, 2018 7:41:30 AM
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Daemon wrote:
So much does friendship triumph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings vanish at the meeting not only of real friends, but of the most distant acquaintances, and substitutes happiness in their room.

John Filson (1747-1788)


Too quick, too easy. The friendship has its price too. There are some doubts about sincerity of this claim...
monamagda
Posted: Sunday, August 19, 2018 11:38:57 AM

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Context from:The Adventures of Colonel Daniel Boon

Part I

This day John Stewart and I had a pleasing ramble, but fortune changed the scene in the close of it. We had passed through a great forest on which stood myriads of trees, some gay with blossoms, others rich with fruits. Nature was here a series of wonders, and a fund of delight. Here she displayed her ingenuity and industry in a variety of flowers and fruits, beautifully coloured, elegantly shaped, and charmingly flavoured; and we were diverted with innumerable animals presenting themselves perpetually to our view.--In the decline of the day, near Kentucke river, as we ascended the brow of a small hill, a number of Indians rushed out of a thick cane-brake upon us, and made us prisoners. The time of our sorrow was now arrived, and the scene fully opened. The Indians plundered us of what we had, and kept us in confinement seven days, treating us with common savage usage. During this time we discovered no uneasiness or desire to escape, which made them less suspicious of us; but in the dead of night, as we lay in a thick cane-brake by a large fire, when sleep had locked up their senses, my situation not disposing me for rest, I touched my companion and gently awoke him. We improved this favourable opportunity, and departed, leaving them to take their rest, and speedily directed our course towards our old camp, but found it plundered, and the company dispersed and gone home. About this time my brother, Squire Boon, with another adventurer, who came to explore the country shortly after us, was wandering through the forest, determined to find me, if possible, and accidentally found our camp. Notwithstanding the unfortunate circumstances of our company, and our dangerous situation, as surrounded with hostile savages, our meeting so fortunately in the wilderness made us reciprocally sensible of the utmost satisfaction. So much does friendship triumph over misfortune, that sorrows and sufferings vanish at the meeting not only of real friends, but of the most distant acquaintances, and substitutes happiness in their room.

Soon after this, my companion in captivity, John Stewart, was killed by the savages, and the man that came with my brother returned home by himself. We were then in a dangerous, helpless situation, exposed daily to perils and death amongst savages and wild beasts, not a white man in the country but ourselves.

Thus situated, many hundred miles from our families in the howling wilderness, I believe few would have equally enjoyed the happiness we experienced. I often observed to my brother, You see now how little nature requires to be satisfied. Felicity, the companion of content, is rather found in our own breasts than in the enjoyment of external things; And I firmly believe it requires but a little philosophy to make a man happy in whatsoever state he is. This consists in a full resignation to the will of Providence; and a resigned soul finds pleasure in a path strewed with briars and thorns.

Read more : https://www.pagebypagebooks.com/John_Filson/The_Adventures_of_Colonel_Daniel_Boone/The_Adventures_of_Colonel_Daniel_Boon_p2.html

dave argo
Posted: Sunday, August 19, 2018 8:29:48 PM

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Meeting those 'savages' next time, by then qualifying for distant acquaintances, must have been a happy occasion for the triumph of friendship over misfortune.Dancing
MANJUICEBUBBLES
Posted: Monday, August 20, 2018 12:03:52 AM

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Location: Miami Beach, Florida, United States
And when we use that lesson it never rewards us and then we end up repeating the same mistake!

"Foolishness is indeed the sister of wickedness."
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