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Can I use "aboard" with any type of transportation either public or personal? Options
Hemant Patel 1
Posted: Thursday, August 9, 2018 11:13:01 PM

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Can I use "aboard" with any type of transportation either public or personal?

aboard the bike
aboard the bicycle
aboard the tricycle
aboard the horse
aboard the donkey
aboard the boat
aboard the hot air balloon
aboard the space shuttle
aboard the submarine
aboard the army tank
aboard the surf board
aboard the jet ski

If there is/are wrong, please let me now Why?
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 2:55:18 AM

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The vehicle/transport normal definitions are:

a·board adv.
1. On board a ship, train, aircraft, or other passenger vehicle.

American Heritage
1. on, in, onto, or into (a ship, train, aircraft, etc)
Collins English Dictionary
1. on board; on, in, or into a ship, train, airplane, bus, etc.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary

It was originally only used for ships/boats ('bord' was the Old French and Old English word for gunwales - the top part of the side of a ship or boat).


Its use has been extended to planes and trains and buses.

I would expect some people to use 'aboard' for balloons, submarines, tanks - even jet-skis

It is sometimes used for cars (though not so often - I would normally just say "in the car").

I don't think it would be wrong to use for a bike or trike (bicycle, tricycle), but would not be common.

It's not used for animals usually - though it might be used jokingly or metaphorically - especially the phrase 'All aboard!', jokingly telling someone to get on the horse or whatever.

Why? - Because that's how people use the word. There is no rule or law.
Probably because animals don't have boards. You sit astride a horse, not aboard it.



Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Romany
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 8:48:07 AM
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Hemant,

I'm afraid that I'm a lot less "laissez-faire" about language than Drago:Sick - where he uses the word "unusual" I usually call it as "incorrect" to students who are learning English!Anxious

So I'm afraid that I have never heard/used/read "aboard" in connection with a bike/trike; and can't imagine any native-speaking parent not correcting a child who said they were "aboard" either of these.

As someone who has been involved in sea-sports all my life - and continues to be - I can confidently say that anyone who spoke about being "aboard" a jet-ski or a surfoard would not only get some wierd looks but,in the case of the surfing community, a few laughs!

"Aboard" used to refer to hot-air balloons too, but now one usually travels "in" one. However, if you used it there it might be considered 'old school' (old-fashioned) but wouldn't raise any eyebrows.

Although I lived in a war-zone for many years, I never heard of anyone being "aboard" a tank - however, that was in Africa, so don't know if it's used in other places.

"Aboard" means to be inside a vehicle: - you can't get inside a bike, surfboard, donkey, jet-ski etc. you are "on" the vehicle/device/animal.

You can be inside a train, boat, plane, tram, or bus. (And yes, in a tank but, as I said, am not certain about this usage.)

Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 9:10:23 AM

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It seems to be a popular word in horsey circles, though. These are example sentences in the Oxford Dictionary.

Quote:
‘In the concluding 11 furlong race, Spencer will be aboard Mickmacmagooole, trained in Ireland by Seamus O'Donnell.’
‘The stewards found that the racecourse had been used as a training ground and that the rider, Timmy Murphy, had made insufficient effort aboard the horse.’
‘He is named aboard four horses in three races on the ten-race program at Saratoga Race Course.’
‘Among Taylor's wins was a victory aboard Bridal Gal in the New Braunfels Stakes on September 17.’
‘Photo number two shows local postman Owen McDonald aboard his horse and cart driving up Ballymanus Terrace.’
‘He has already won in Limerick on his other horse Ballytobin and aboard Kilcrea Shyan in Listowel two years ago.’
‘Other notable triumphs were three wins aboard Zuhair in the Charlton Stakes at Goodwood, a race now named in the horse's honour.’
‘His last win was aboard a horse called Volvo at Punchestown.’
‘Troopers aboard untried war horses simply had no chance against heavily armored tank divisions.’
‘The date is March of this year and Carrie Ford has the most realistic chance handed to a woman of winning the Grand National aboard Forest Gunner.’
‘It was to be the high point of a wonderful day for Walsh, who won the Grand National at Aintree aboard his father, Ted's, horse, Papillon, two years ago.’
‘He broke in at Sunland Park in New Mexico and won aboard his first mount, Fetch, in 1974.’
‘The Raven Run was the third time Bridgmohan had teamed up with For All We Know, and his second win aboard the chestnut filly.’
‘Before last Sunday week his biggest win came aboard Eva Luna in the Heinz 57 at Leopardstown in 1994.’
‘The Downptarick pilot won the Grand National aboard Lord Gyllene in 1997 and has also finished second in two Cheltenham Gold Cup races.’


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Wilmar (USA)
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 1:56:10 PM

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Agreed with Romany. I would think that a person learning a language would (also) want to learn to use the language as the native-speakers do, so as to not sound "odd".
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 2:52:51 PM
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Drag0nspeaker wrote:
It seems to be a popular word in horsey circles, though. These are example sentences in the Oxford Dictionary.


Thanks for that. I would have considered those incorrect before I read your post.
BobShilling
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 3:02:21 PM
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Romany wrote:
"Aboard" means to be inside a vehicle:


I disagree.

In my days in a branch of the Royal Navy, I stepped aboard as soon as I stepped from the quayside to the boat/ship. Once my feet had left land, I was aboard. I was aboard some vessels that had no possibility of being 'inside'.
Hemant Patel 1
Posted: Friday, August 10, 2018 4:31:28 PM

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And what about aboard the carriage? Carriages pulled by animals (horses, cows)
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 3:28:30 AM

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The only people I know who have ridden in a carriage are the royal family and a few odd political visitors.

I've never heard of anyone being 'aboard' a carriage.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
BobShilling
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 5:14:23 AM
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I seem to recall passengers in some westerns being told to 'climb aboard' a stagecoach.
Sarrriesfan
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 9:07:24 AM

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Quote:

Although I lived in a war-zone for many years, I never heard of anyone being "aboard" a tank - however, that was in Africa, so don't know if it's used in other places.


Romany it's quite often used when other troops such as infantry men ride on the outside of a tank.

For example in this image.
http://www.iwmprints.org.uk/image/743352/sherman-mk-iii-tank-of-the-indian-armoured-corps-with-infantry-of-the-bombay-grenadiers-aboard-training-in-the-middle-east-march-1944

It's similar to Bobs usage of climbing aboard a stagecoach.



I lack the imagination for a witty signature.
BobShilling
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 2:03:52 PM
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Sarrriesfan wrote:
it's quite often used when other troops such as infantry men ride on the outside of a tank.

Quite.

It's used by some in ways that others would not use it. I think Drag0's post (the second in this thread) paints a fair picture.
Romany
Posted: Saturday, August 11, 2018 6:50:31 PM
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Sarries -

Thank you for that: now I see what you were getting at. In Southern Africa and up on the border that would not have been possible. (Civillions couldn't even drive with their car windows down!)

Bob -
For the purposes of trying to clarify the differences for a learner I thought the "inside" and "on" might have been a handy rule-of-thumb?

And for the purposes of discourse I would contend that - members of the Royal Navy excepted - most people would agree with the concept of being "inside" a boat/ship/corracle/canoe? If for no other reason than that they all have to have curved sides in order to float, and we travel within these. Otherwise we're "on" a barge/dredger/raft?

Drago - I've lived in a few places that give carriage rides through the parks - I wonder if that was what Hement was thinking of?
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 1:51:11 AM
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Romany wrote:
I would contend that - members of the Royal Navy excepted - most people would agree with the concept of being "inside" a boat/ship/corracle/canoe? If for no other reason than that they all have to have curved sides in order to float, and we travel within these.


I might be in a small boat, coracle or canoe, but I most certainly would not be inside it.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 11:23:49 AM
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Bob - ah, then as a landlubber it would appear we hold to different semantics in this particular instance.

I guess that's of less importance than whether my rule-of-thumb guide helped or hindered the OP?Think
BobShilling
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 1:42:35 PM
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Romany wrote:
I guess that's of less importance than whether my rule-of-thumb guide helped or hindered the OP?Think


I would say that it is less than helpful. As Sarriesfan pointed out, you can be aboard a tank when you are certainly not inside it. You can be aboard a stagecoach when you are sitting on top, next to the driver. I, personally, find the notion of being inside a rowing boat or canoe very strange.
Romany
Posted: Sunday, August 12, 2018 8:17:23 PM
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Bob -

We obviously attach slightly different semantic values to the concept of "inside" - I'm certainly not going to quarrel over it.

Pax?
BobShilling
Posted: Monday, August 13, 2018 12:18:15 AM
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Vobiscum.
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Tuesday, August 14, 2018 10:02:25 AM

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Et cum spiritu tuo.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
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