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Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the... Options
Daemon
Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
KSPavan
Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 3:02:19 AM

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Quotation of the Day

Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings.

George Eliot (1819-1880)
Joe Haas
Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:00:31 PM
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Joined: 8/7/2017
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Location: Concord, New Hampshire, United States
Here in New Hampshire we have RSA Chapter 21:2 at: http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/I/21/21-2.htm that reads: "Common Usage. – Words and phrases shall be construed according to the common and approved usage of the language; but technical words and phrases, and such others as may have acquired a peculiar and appropriate meaning in law, shall be construed and understood according to such peculiar and appropriate meaning." as it pertains to the statutes, but when it comes to the Constitution, even the court clerks and judges use George Orwellian "Doublespeak" [ https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/doublespeak aka gobbledygook ] and say, for example, in Article 14 [ https://www.nh.gov/glance/bill-of-rights.htm ] that the word "free" is really without the letter "r" that they've got to charge you a $ "fee"! I call that CRIMINAL Theft by Extortion! R.S.A. Ch. 637:5,II(g) http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/rsa/html/LXII/637/637-5.htm but who is a Sheriff to ENFORCE the laws? like Buford Pusser of: "Walking Tall" to tell these Court Clerks demanding such that they either allow the filing or else be arrested for demanding such money!
monamagda
Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:07:46 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 2/4/2014
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Location: Bogotá, Bogota D.C., Colombia


Context from :Adam Bede

Book Two.

Chapter XVII. In Which the Story Pauses a Little


But, my good friend, what will you do then with your fellow- parishioner who opposes your husband in the vestry? With your newly appointed vicar, whose style of preaching you find painfully below that of his regretted predecessor? With the honest servant who worries your soul with her one failing? With your neighbour, Mrs. Green, who was really kind to you in your last illness, but has said several ill-natured things about you since your convalescence? Nay, with your excellent husband himself, who has other irritating habits besides that of not wiping his shoes? These fellow-mortals, every one, must be accepted as they are: you can neither straighten their noses, nor brighten their wit, nor rectify their dispositions; and it is these people--amongst whom your life is passed--that it is needful you should tolerate, pity, and love: it is these more or less ugly, stupid, inconsistent people whose movements of goodness you should be able to admire-- for whom you should cherish all possible hopes, all possible patience. And I would not, even if I had the choice, be the clever novelist who could create a world so much better than this, in which we get up in the morning to do our daily work, that you would be likely to turn a harder, colder eye on the dusty streets and the common green fields--on the real breathing men and women, who can be chilled by your indifference or injured by your prejudice; who can be cheered and helped onward by your fellow- feeling, your forbearance, your outspoken, brave justice.

So I am content to tell my simple story, without trying to make things seem better than they were; dreading nothing, indeed, but falsity, which, in spite of one's best efforts, there is reason to dread. Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult. The pencil is conscious of a delightful facility in drawing a griffin--the longer the claws, and the larger the wings, the better; but that marvellous facility which we mistook for genius is apt to forsake us when we want to draw a real unexaggerated lion. Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings--much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth.

It is for this rare, precious quality of truthfulness that I delight in many Dutch paintings, which lofty-minded people despise. I find a source of delicious sympathy in these faithful pictures of a monotonous homely existence, which has been the fate of so many more among my fellow-mortals than a life of pomp or of absolute indigence, of tragic suffering or of world-stirring actions. I turn, without shrinking, from cloud-borne angels, from prophets, sibyls, and heroic warriors, to an old woman bending over her flower-pot, or eating her solitary dinner, while the noonday light, softened perhaps by a screen of leaves, falls on her mob-cap, and just touches the rim of her spinning-wheel, and her stone jug, and all those cheap common things which are the precious necessaries of life to her--or I turn to that village wedding, kept between four brown walls, where an awkward bridegroom opens the dance with a high-shouldered, broad-faced bride, while elderly and middle-aged friends look on, with very irregular noses and lips, and probably with quart-pots in their hands, but with an expression of unmistakable contentment and goodwill. "Foh!" says my idealistic friend, "what vulgar details! What good is there in taking all these pains to give an exact likeness of old women and clowns? What a low phase of life! What clumsy, ugly people!"

Read more : http://www.classicreader.com/book/585/17/

Bully_rus
Posted: Tuesday, July 3, 2018 12:41:11 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/26/2013
Posts: 2,549
Neurons: 186,598
Location: Minsk, Minskaya Voblasts', Belarus
Daemon wrote:
Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings.

George Eliot (1819-1880)


Yeah. Precisely. The built-in exactness of the truth makes it so hard to master...
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