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Is the colon next to 'from' needed? Options
Koh Elaine
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 2:22:03 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 3,552
Neurons: 14,661
From today onwards, we will learn from: “No. 1. It is difficult to hear the doctrine of ichinen sanzen”.

Is the colon next to 'from' needed?

Thanks.
FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, June 6, 2018 6:01:17 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/19/2011
Posts: 9,010
Neurons: 48,288
Koh Elaine wrote:
From today onwards, we will learn from: “No. 1. It is difficult to hear the doctrine of ichinen sanzen”.

Is the colon next to 'from' needed?

Thanks.


Without more context, it's hard to say how the sentence should be worded, but it needs different words, IMO.

It sounds like this is an instruction lesson. If so, perhaps a better wording might be: "Today, we will begin learning from lesson No.1, titled, It is difficult to hear the doctrine of Inchinen Sanzen.


A great many people will think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices. ~ William James ~
Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 5:23:45 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 9/12/2011
Posts: 29,057
Neurons: 166,621
Location: Livingston, Scotland, United Kingdom
I agree with FounDit.
Without more context, I'm not sure, but I think this means "We will start with '1. It is difficult to hear the doctrine of ichinen sanzen', and continue through all the maxims during the rest of the course/term/year."

The phrase "learn from" has a different meaning.

On learns from a teacher.
Or
One learns from an experience (of one's own or someone else's).

I have always tried to learn from the great philosophers.
I learned, from having broken my arm twice, that mountain-climbing was not the sport for me.


Wyrd bið ful aræd - bull!
Koh Elaine
Posted: Thursday, June 7, 2018 12:00:42 PM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/4/2012
Posts: 3,552
Neurons: 14,661
Thanks, FounDit and DragOnspeaker.
TMe
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:19:27 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 1/12/2017
Posts: 712
Neurons: 4,520
Ichinen Sanzen is a principal that teaches us



“one’s life at each moment” (Ichinen) - “contains great potentials” (Sanzen).



In other words: “At each moment, one’s life has the power to shape one’s future and influence the environment”.


Shouldn't ichinen sanzen be written as Ichinen Sanzen?

I am a layman.
Ashwin Joshi
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:34:33 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/3/2016
Posts: 1,392
Neurons: 71,740
Location: Jandiāla Guru, Punjab, India
What are the implications of the principle of Ichinen Sanzen?



- Destiny is not fixed: The concept of IchinenSanzen is derived from the Lotus Sutra, which differs from pre-Lotus teachings in regard to attainment of Buddhahood (and to overcoming one’s karmic obstacles). Based on the Lotus Sutra, Nichiren Buddhism teaches that one’s future is not dictated by past karma, but by one’s current actions (or life-essence) at each moment.



Our present life-essence (ichinen), intention or determination - directs our life to create a relevant scenario of future events. Any situation we experience at present has an impact on the future. The future we are inspired to create starts from our determined actions at each moment - based on the Mystic Law.



- Buddhahood is a reality: According to the principle of IchinenSanzen, life at each moment contains - not only the lower states of suffering - but Buddhahood as well , as a potential. The teaching of the “Ten Factors of Life” (mentioned in the Hoben chapter of the Lotus Sutra) implies that there is no physical or mental barrier preventing ordinary people from attaining Buddhahood. Additionally, the Mutual Possession of the Ten Worlds, (Juryo Chapter) teaches that in any state of life, Buddhahood exists as a potential (or dormant state) awaiting manifestation. These teachings are the essence of Ichinen Sanzen - which teaches that not only the lower states of hardships and sufferings exist, but also the higher states of life including Buddhahood, and that all these states of life have the same right to exist and manifest at any moment of time.



- Interconnectedness of Individual, Society and Environment: Buddhism distinguishes three realms of existence of life; the Individual, society and the environment. What is valid for the individual (experiencing the Ten Worlds in own life) is also valid for a “group of individuals” – or society, as well as for the environment - without which people do not exist.



IchinenSanzen teaches the inseparability of these three realms: oneself - as an individual - society to which one belongs, and the environment sustaining all life.



The interconnectedness of these three realms implies that: an inner change in the life of an individual can trigger a change in the lives of others and can affect the surrounding environment.



- Ichinen Sanzen is the Ultimate Truth:



At this moment of time (ichinen), there are uncountable events taking place in people’s lives, expressing the Ten Worlds. One’s life is inseparable from the life of all living beings and environment, although one’s life may be different from others but all lives exist at the same time in this one moment. The sum of all lives at this moment of time is the cosmic life, the ultimate truth.

This observation indicates that there is no separation of one’s own life from the ultimate truth (which is the cosmic life itself). It basically teaches that one’s life - and all life of the universe are one existence.



- The Gohonzon (the Life of Buddha) expresses Ichinen Sanzen:



The central purpose of the doctrine of Ichinen Sanzen is to declare that Buddhahood is an “inherent state” within the reality of all life. Despite the infinite diversity of all life events and situations, it is possible to view them through the criterion of the Ten Worlds, with the possibility for their transformation to the state of Buddhahood.



Nichiren encoded his life state of Buddhahood in a manada Gohonzon, which includes the life of individual, and also powers of protection of society and the environment. The Life of Buddhahood then encompasses all reality: being the interconnectedness of the Ten Worlds in the life of individuals, living beings and the environment.



At each moment (Ichinen) all diverse events in reality (Sanzen) exists at the same time manifesting their highest state of existence only in the life of Buddha, which is encoded in form of the Gohoznon.

___________________________________________





Author: Safwan Zabalawi (Darshams)


Yes, it should be in capitals.

Me Gathering Pebbles at The Seashore.-Aj
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