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She might yet be able to help him to the building of the rainbow bridge that should connect the prose in us with the passion.... Options
Daemon
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:00:00 AM
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She might yet be able to help him to the building of the rainbow bridge that should connect the prose in us with the passion. Without it we are meaningless fragments, half monks, half beasts, unconnected arches that have never joined into a man.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)
KSPavan
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 2:43:56 AM

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Quotation of the Day

She might yet be able to help him to the building of the rainbow bridge that should connect the prose in us with the passion. Without it we are meaningless fragments, half monks, half beasts, unconnected arches that have never joined into a man.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)
AndySon
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 5:54:53 AM
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For me, it is quite hard to understand this quote. Does anyone have any explanation to what the meaning might be?
thar
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 7:42:11 AM

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I wouldn't bother with the quote in isolation. It is not supposed to be read as some Confucian philosophy - it is part of the story.

Unless you want to read the story, I wouldn't bother trying to extract one line of it and expecting deep meaning.
It is just imagery - paint your own picture.

A bit of context, but this is half-way through the book already. There are lots of references that will make no sense without having reached this point.

Quote:
Margaret greeted her lord with peculiar tenderness on the morrow. Mature as he was, she might yet be able to help him to the building of the rainbow bridge that should connect the prose in us with the passion. Without it we are meaningless fragments, half monks, half beasts, unconnected arches that have never joined into a man. With it love is born, and alights on the highest curve, glowing against the grey, sober against the fire. Happy the man who sees from either aspect the glory of these outspread wings. The roads of his soul lie clear, and he and his friends shall find easy-going.

It was hard-going in the roads of Mr. Wilcox's soul. From boyhood he had neglected them. "I am not a fellow who bothers about my own inside." Outwardly he was cheerful, reliable, and brave; but within, all had reverted to chaos, ruled, so far as it was ruled at all, by an incomplete asceticism. Whether as boy, husband, or widower, he had always the sneaking belief that bodily passion is bad, a belief that is desirable only when held passionately. Religion had confirmed him. The words that were read aloud on Sunday to him and to other respectable men were the words that had once kindled the souls of St. Catherine and St. Francis into a white-hot hatred of the carnal. He could not be as the saints and love the Infinite with a seraphic ardour, but he could be a little ashamed of loving a wife. Amabat, amare timebat. And it was here that Margaret hoped to help him.



It did not seem so difficult. She need trouble him with no gift of her own. She would only point out the salvation that was latent in his own soul, and in the soul of every man. Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon. Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its height. Live in fragments no longer. Only connect and the beast and the monk, robbed of the isolation that is life to either, will die.

Nor was the message difficult to give. It need not take the form of a good "talking." By quiet indications the bridge would be built and span their lives with beauty.

But she failed. For there was one quality in Henry for which she was never prepared, however much she reminded herself of it: his obtuseness. He simply did not notice things, and there was no more to be said. He never noticed that Helen and Frieda were hostile, or that Tibby was not interested in currant plantations; he never noticed the lights and shades that exist in the greyest conversation, the finger-posts, the milestones, the collisions, the illimitable views. Once--on another occasion--she scolded him about it. He was puzzled, but replied with a laugh: "My motto is Concentrate. I've no intention of frittering away my strength on that sort of thing." "It isn't frittering away the strength," she protested. "It's enlarging the space in which you may be strong." He answered: "You're a clever little woman, but my motto's Concentrate." And this morning he concentrated with a vengeance.









Bully_rus
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 8:18:00 AM
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Daemon wrote:
She might yet be able to help him to the building of the rainbow bridge that should connect the prose in us with the passion. Without it we are meaningless fragments, half monks, half beasts, unconnected arches that have never joined into a man.

E. M. Forster (1879-1970)


Yeah. What a great passage for understanding – who depends on whom and why?
draoubelkacem
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 11:29:35 AM

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Location: Médéa, Medea, Algeria
yes you are right
AndySon
Posted: Wednesday, June 13, 2018 12:03:18 PM
Rank: Newbie

Joined: 7/30/2017
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@Thar, thank you a lot for the explanation and for providing this passage. It happens oftentimes that the so labelled quotes are not really quotes, but rather well written lines from bigger texts.
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