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I have English exam . Help me!! Options
Romina Banoo
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 5:24:07 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/3/2018
Posts: 15
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Location: Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany
What is the difference between these 2 sentences?

1)Who watched the movie last night?

2)who did watch the movie last night?d'oh!
papo_308
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 6:25:11 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 3/29/2012
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Location: Velké Meziříčí, Vysocina, Czech Republic
Hi Romina,

2) is not correct.

If you ask about the subject, you must use normal word order (without inversion or the auxiliary do):

He watched the movie last night. (He is the subject)

Who watched the movie last night? (The answer is He did)
Orson Burleigh
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 8:00:31 AM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 10/12/2011
Posts: 197
Neurons: 90,324
Location: Annapolis, Maryland, United States
Miss Romina wrote:
What is the difference between these 2 sentences?

1)Who watched the movie last night?

2)who did watch the movie last night?d'oh!


Both versions of the question are proper English sentences, proper, grammatically correct questions, and both versions are requests for substantially the same information.

There are many possible differences in circumstance which might cause the questioner to shift from the first form of the sentence to the slightly more emphatic second version. The difference between the two versions of the question are down to nuance, to intent or mood of the questioner, or to circumstance.

In one possible scenario a teacher might have directed a class to watch a specific movie. At the next session of the class the teacher might initially use the first form of the question: " Who watched the movie last night?"
If the response from the students seemed inadequate, the teacher might rephrase the question to a more emphatic version: "Who did watch the movie last night?" Use of the slightly more emphatic second version of the question might imply that the teacher guessed that the students had failed to watch the movie or they had switched the movie on but had not actually paid attention while the movie ran.
Romina Banoo
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 8:05:01 AM

Rank: Newbie

Joined: 5/3/2018
Posts: 15
Neurons: 16,673
Location: Frankfurt am Main, Hesse, Germany
Orson Burleigh wrote:
Miss Romina wrote:
What is the difference between these 2 sentences?

1)Who watched the movie last night?

2)who did watch the movie last night?d'oh!


Both versions of the question are proper English sentences, proper, grammatically correct questions, and both versions are requests for substantially the same information.

There are many possible differences in circumstance which might cause the questioner to shift from the first form of the sentence to the slightly more emphatic second version. The difference between the two versions of the question are down to nuance, to intent or mood of the questioner, or to circumstance.

In one possible scenario a teacher might have directed a class to watch a specific movie. At the next session of the class the teacher might initially use the first form of the question: " Who watched the movie last night?"
If the response from the students seemed inadequate, the teacher might rephrase the question to a more emphatic version: "Who did watch the movie last night?" Use of the slightly more emphatic second version of the question might imply that the teacher guessed that the students had failed to watch the movie or they had switched the movie on but had not actually paid attention while the movie ran.


Really helpfull !!! Thanks
Romany
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 8:20:27 AM
Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 6/14/2009
Posts: 14,400
Neurons: 44,858
Location: Brighton, England, United Kingdom
One thing that might also be handy to know is the difference between a demand and a request in English.

Your top heading includes "Help me!". This is a demand and, in English, is considered impolite. The exclamation mark at the end makes it not just impolite, but turns it into an order. (Unless you are falling down a cliff or something and are desperate!)

A request includes the word "please". "Please help me." "Could you please help?" "Can anyone help me, please?"

As you have just joined you may not have been aware of this difference, so people understand you simply didn't know. But, in future, if you "order" someone to give you help, they might just ignore you!Sick
hedy mmm
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 6:36:07 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 7/29/2014
Posts: 1,093
Neurons: 529,957
Location: Borough of Bronx, New York, United States
Orsen Burleigh wrote:
Both versions of the question are proper English sentences, proper, grammatically correct questions, and both versions are requests for substantially the same information.

papo_308 wrote:
The response to, "Who watched the movie last night"...would be "He watched the movie last night".

I would like to add that the response could be of an individual or collectively, "We watched..."

However, the question by Miss Rominia was, "What is the difference between these 2 sentences?"
So, both responders had correct answers, although I do agree with papo_308, that 1) is correct (it's more natural)

Miss Romani, the title of your thread, "I have English exam.Help me!!", is perfectly fine...

It was not a demand but an earnest request...there is a difference. The double exclamation marks are indicative of the urgency to know the answer because "you have an English exam", (yes I would add an to your "Urgent request", which was NOT an order.)

Miss Romani Welcome to TFD...you will always find help!
hedy
Dancing Dancing



"God graced us with today....don't waste it." hedy
leonAzul
Posted: Monday, June 11, 2018 7:14:05 PM

Rank: Advanced Member

Joined: 8/11/2011
Posts: 8,468
Neurons: 27,420
Location: Miami, Florida, United States
Romany wrote:
One thing that might also be handy to know is the difference between a demand and a request in English.

Your top heading includes "Help me!". This is a demand and, in English, is considered impolite. The exclamation mark at the end makes it not just impolite, but turns it into an order. (Unless you are falling down a cliff or something and are desperate!)

A request includes the word "please". "Please help me." "Could you please help?" "Can anyone help me, please?"

As you have just joined you may not have been aware of this difference, so people understand you simply didn't know. But, in future, if you "order" someone to give you help, they might just ignore you!Sick


I am very much in accord with this. Many persons who participate here have good guidance with regard to the mechanical workings of English grammar, yet without the experience of regular conversation they lack the niceties of everyday speech.

I would like to add that after over six decades of speaking English natively, I still take note when someone who has more experience as an educator than me makes a comment, especially when that comment is kind and helpful.
Think


"Make it go away, Mrs Whatsit," he whispered. "Make it go away. It's evil."
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